Topics

repeated questions


ed_mines
 

(1) some of the newer members may be able to add information to a
previously discussed subject, and (2) it is difficult to scan the
archives of the group. One might have to scan through many, many
blocks of messages to find an old topic.

Ed "use you full name" Mines


pullmanboss <tgmadden@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "ed_mines" <ed_mines@y...> wrote:
(1) some of the newer members may be able to add information to a
previously discussed subject, and (2) it is difficult to scan the
archives of the group. One might have to scan through many, many
blocks of messages to find an old topic.
One always hopes that new participants can bring something to the
table besides their curiosity. That's how we can all learn. As for
the archives, yes, they are clumsy to work through. But they are a
resource of almost infinite value. If you walked into the library at
the California State RR Museum and asked Ellen when arch bar trucks
were banned from interchange, she would refer you to a group of
books in which you might find the answer. I doubt anyone would be
upset with her for not giving the answer directly. Nor should any
STMFC subscriber be offended when one of the "uppity regulars"
suggests the answer to a common question can be found in the
archives. It's the old "give a man a fish" vs. "teach a man to fish"
proverb. Often it's better to show you the path than to walk it for
you.

Tom Madden


Roger Parry <uncleroger@...>
 

AMEN to that, give us the tools!

On Aug 29, 2005, at 2:22 AM, pullmanboss wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "ed_mines" <ed_mines@y...> wrote:
(1) some of the newer members may be able to add information to a
previously discussed subject, and (2) it is difficult to scan the
archives of the group. One might have to scan through many, many
blocks of messages to find an old topic.
One always hopes that new participants can bring something to the
table besides their curiosity. That's how we can all learn. As for
the archives, yes, they are clumsy to work through. But they are a
resource of almost infinite value. If you walked into the library at
the California State RR Museum and asked Ellen when arch bar trucks
were banned from interchange, she would refer you to a group of
books in which you might find the answer. I doubt anyone would be
upset with her for not giving the answer directly. Nor should any
STMFC subscriber be offended when one of the "uppity regulars"
suggests the answer to a common question can be found in the
archives. It's the old "give a man a fish" vs. "teach a man to fish"
proverb. Often it's better to show you the path than to walk it for
you.

Tom Madden






Yahoo! Groups Links







Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Roger Parry wrote (replying to Tom Madden:
AMEN to that, give us the tools!
Ah, but then the tool provider gets called "arrogant" and "elitist" for not providing a fully researched, compact and complete answer, preferably within a couple of hours, to the exact question asked. And some of that attitude no doubt stems from the speed and convenience of the Internet, on account of which searching for a book sounds like the Dark Ages. Notice I didn't include "accuracy" of the Internet.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history