Walthers 34' PS 3 Coal Hopper


Richard White
 

There is a guy offering these for $7.95 on e-bay.
Is it suitable for the steam era?
Is the Illinois Central version authentic?
Thank you for your help
Richard White



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Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Richard White wrote:

There is a guy offering these for $7.95 on e-bay.
Is it suitable for the steam era?
Is the Illinois Central version authentic?
The April 1949 ORER listed 397 IC hoppers in the #73600-73999 series which had two bays, had inside lengths of 34' 2", cubic capacity of 2,256 feet and 50-ton trucks. The series was described as "Hopper, Corten Steel" - that steel I believe was a Pullman-Standard proprietary product. Now how well Walthers model replicates this series is the question - I do not have a photo of a "real" IC hopper in the #73600-73999 series to compare - Walthers model has the #73674 car number.

Tim Gilbert


Ray Breyer <rbreyer@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Tim
Gilbert
Sent: Thursday, October 06, 2005 7:53 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Walthers 34' PS 3 Coal Hopper

Richard White wrote:

There is a guy offering these for $7.95 on e-bay.
Is it suitable for the steam era?
Is the Illinois Central version authentic?
The April 1949 ORER listed 397 IC hoppers in the #73600-73999 series
which had two bays, had inside lengths of 34' 2", cubic capacity of
2,256 feet and 50-ton trucks. The series was described as "Hopper,
Corten Steel" - that steel I believe was a Pullman-Standard proprietary
product. Now how well Walthers model replicates this series is the
question - I do not have a photo of a "real" IC hopper in the
#73600-73999 series to compare - Walthers model has the #73674 car number.

Tim Gilbert







Yahoo! Groups Links


Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Tim,

Cor-Ten (TM) steel is a name for certain products developed by U.S. Steel. It was used by Pullman and some other companies for freight car side sheets for its high strength to weight ratio and its corrosion resistence.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Tim Gilbert wrote:

The April 1949 ORER listed 397 IC hoppers in the #73600-73999 series

which had two bays, had inside lengths of 34' 2", cubic capacity of 2,256 feet and 50-ton trucks. The series was described as "Hopper, Corten Steel" - that steel I believe was a Pullman-Standard proprietary product . . . .
Tim Gilbert


Ray Breyer <rbreyer@...>
 

Tim,

There's a copy of the class diagram on the Fallen Flags site, and a photo on
the NEB&W site.

I think that with a little work, the Walthers car might serve as a stand-in
for these IC hoppers. But with the IC having several thousand conventional
twin hoppers, how often would these 400 cars really show up?

Ray Breyer

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Tim
Gilbert
Sent: Thursday, October 06, 2005 7:53 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Walthers 34' PS 3 Coal Hopper

Richard White wrote:

There is a guy offering these for $7.95 on e-bay.
Is it suitable for the steam era?
Is the Illinois Central version authentic?
The April 1949 ORER listed 397 IC hoppers in the #73600-73999 series
which had two bays, had inside lengths of 34' 2", cubic capacity of
2,256 feet and 50-ton trucks. The series was described as "Hopper,
Corten Steel" - that steel I believe was a Pullman-Standard proprietary
product. Now how well Walthers model replicates this series is the
question - I do not have a photo of a "real" IC hopper in the
#73600-73999 series to compare - Walthers model has the #73674 car number.

Tim Gilbert







Yahoo! Groups Links














Yahoo! Groups Links


SUVCWORR@...
 

Tim:

Corten steel was a proprietary trade mark of US Steel. This was a speciality steel which was self protecting in that in rusting it formed a skin of iron oxide that bonded with the surface of the steel and sealed it preventing further rusting. The first use of Cor-Ten steel in a freight car was by the B&O in 1934. Cor-ten is a high strength steel and allowed the construction of cars with approximately 8% less weight from the steel components. The debate is does the weight savings warrant the significant increase in the cost of construction.

Rich Orr

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thu, 06 Oct 2005 09:53:29 -0400
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Walthers 34' PS 3 Coal Hopper

<snip>

The series was described as "Hopper,
Corten Steel" - that steel I believe was a Pullman-Standard proprietary
product.
<snip>


Tim O'Connor
 

Two points: A better 2 bay PS3 can be kitbashed from Stewart hoppers,
and hopefully someone will eventually produce a more accurate and more
detailed replacement for the ancient Walthers (ne Train Miniature) model.
I think there was an article published on how to cut up Stewarts to make
PS3's (something like 3 bodies to make 2 cars)...

In the meantime I have a bunch of the TM hoppers from my Dad's pile of
stuff that will be going to Ebay eventually for less than $7.95 each. Ugh!

Tim O'Connor

I think that with a little work, the Walthers car might serve as a stand-in
for these IC hoppers. But with the IC having several thousand conventional
twin hoppers, how often would these 400 cars really show up?
Ray Breyer


Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Rich,

Thanks for the correction -

Next Question - did any other car builder than Pullman-Standard use Cor-Ten Steel?

Tim Gilbert

SUVCWORR@... wrote:

Tim:

Corten steel was a proprietary trade mark of US Steel. This was a speciality steel which was self protecting in that in rusting it formed a skin of iron oxide that bonded with the surface of the steel and sealed it preventing further rusting. The first use of Cor-Ten steel in a freight car was by the B&O in 1934. Cor-ten is a high strength steel and allowed the construction of cars with approximately 8% less weight from the steel components. The debate is does the weight savings warrant the significant increase in the cost of construction.

Rich Orr

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thu, 06 Oct 2005 09:53:29 -0400
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Walthers 34' PS 3 Coal Hopper

<snip>

The series was described as "Hopper,
Corten Steel" - that steel I believe was a Pullman-Standard proprietary
product.
<snip>


Tim O'Connor
 

Tim

As far as I know, Cor-Ten steel was the reason that UP (and later SP)
used Alternate Center Rivet style side sheathing on cars built in their
home shops. ACR is the signature of cars that used the thinner steel.

Tim

Rich,
Thanks for the correction -
Next Question - did any other car builder than Pullman-Standard use
Cor-Ten Steel?
Tim Gilbert