1949 NKP Movements from Swift's Soy Bean Processing Operation in Frankfort IN


Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

In the January 21st through March 15th, 1949 List Bill Darnaby provided,
there were 42 boxcars and 21 tank cars.

Of the 21 Tank Cars, the lessees appear to be the receivers rather than
the shipper. GATX having bought all of Swift's cars including 145 tank
cars in 1930, should have been Swift's lessor. If true, then all the
bean oil shipments should have been GATX or some other reporting mark
owned by GATX. Instead, there were SHPX, AESX, NATX and ATX(?) tank cars
included in the outbound traffic.

There were 11 GATX tank cars among the 21 listed with loads to Proctor &
Gamble, Ivorydale OH (6 - GATX bought P&G's tank car fleet in 1935);
three movements to Swift's Fostoria OH operation; one to Swift-Atlanta
and one car interchanged with the PRR for "IS(?)" what or wherever that is.

Three SHPX tank cars were consigned to Lever Brothers in Hammond IN.
Another four tank cars consigned to Lever's Edgewater NJ operation were
leased from NATX or AESX (a NATX-reporting mark). On 6/11/1948, there
was a GATX tank car consigned to Lever Brothers in Edgewater NJ. It
looks like Lever leased tank cars on the short term - whether the lease
was per trip, per month, or of some other duration I do not know.

Two of the other three tank cars were not billed; - one, owned by AESX;
and the other, a tank car with "ATX" marks. The problem with ATX is that
reporting mark was not included in the April 1949 ORER.

The last of the 21 tank cars was an UTLX Empty. UTLX only leased cars to
the oil companies and independent refiners in 1949. It probably carried
fuel or lubricants for Swift, and was being returned empty to Madison IL.

The supply of boxcars for loading at Swift were empty boxcars in
Frankfort Yard. There are three possible sources of these empty boxcars:
- one, those being returned after being unloaded in the Frankfort Area;
two, those empties plucked opportunistically from primarily westbound
through freights (in August 1948, the NKP plucked the empty westbound
MONON boxcar #1 at Northeast PA so as it could be loaded with Tomato
Juice for Nashville TN (TC)); and last, the release from NKP's Frankfort
Car Shops of recently shopped cars. By January 1949, the rebuilding of
boxcars into NKP's #27000 series boxcars apparently was over, but there
was apparently still plenty of work including, perhaps, retrofitting the
pre-1932 built boxcars with AB Brake Systems.

Eleven of the 42 Boxcars were owned by the NKP and another one was owned
by the W&LE which the NKP acquired in 1949. It is my suspicion that most
of these boxcars were releases from the Frankfort Car Shops.

The 31 Foreign-Owned Boxcars were owned by railroads in seven of the
eight ICC Regions: - only the New England roads were excluded, but they
only owned a little more than 2% of the National Boxcar Fleet.

Six of the boxcars were owned by roads in the Great Lakes Reigion
including three from the NYC, two from the WAB and one from the P&LE. It
was somewhat reassuring that finally NYC boxcars showed up. Eight of
the 31 Boxcars were owned by roads in the Central East Region: - five
from the PRR and one each from the B&O and C&IM. In the Pocahontas
Region, the C&O and N&W were represented with one each. Three boxcars
were owned by roads in the Southern Region: - two by the SOU and one by
the IC.

The Northwest Region was represented by two NP boxcars. The Central West
Region was represented by three CB&Q boxcars, two ATSF boxcars, one RI
boxcars and one WP boxcars. The MP, MKT and KCS, all roads in the
Southwest Region contributed one boxcar each.

If we tabulate the three reports that Bill Darnaby has contributed for
Boxcars by Geographic Region, the following results:

Region 1/1948 6/1948 1/1949 Total
NKP-Home 7 24 11 42
W&LE-Home - - 1 1
"Home" 7 24 12 43

New England 2 1 - 3
Great Lakes 3 - 6 9
Central East 6 1 8 15
Pocahontas 1 - 2 3
Southern 6 4 3 13
Northwest 7 1 2 10
Central West 7 1 7 15
Southwest 1 - 3 4
Canadian 1 1 - 2
"Foreign" 34 8 31 73

"Total" 41 32 43 116

The release of NKP boxcars from Frankfort Car Shops probably increased
the per cent of Home Road Boxcars on Line over what it would have been
otherwise.

With the exceptions of the Great Lakes Region and Canada, it would
appear that the ownership by ICC Regions was more or less the same
percentage as those roads owned of the National Fleet. Because of
Customs, Canadian boxcars were not as free wheeling as those owned by
American roads.

The most plausible reason for the deficiency among the Great Lakes
Region may be the proximity to the NKP which incidentally was another
Great Lakes Region Railroad. Some of the supply of empty boxcars came
from westbound through trains. These westbounds probably did not have
many empty boxcars from the Great Lakes Region. Whatever empties there
were which the NKP could not reload immediately were returned home via
the shortest route/interchange at Buffalo, Cleveland, Bellevue,
Fostoria, Conneaught, Dunkirk, Lima, etc..

As Bill releases more of these movements, I suspect that the foreign
boxcars will remain geographically dispersed although the percentage of
foreign boxcars loaded will vary according to the number of cars
released by the Frankfort Shops, and perhaps, the state of the economy -
the country entered a recession in 1949.

So what does all this mean for modelers of the ATSF, B&O, NYC, SOU, UP,
SP, etc.? The ownership of foreign boxcars on line geographically will
be approximately the same percentage of what that railroad owned of the
national boxcar fleet subject to some allowances such as the UP having
to supply the SP with boxcars to haul lumber. This is what Dave Nelson
and I have been advocating for a long time, and these NKP movement
reports do little to change my mind - I don't know about Dave.

Meanwhile, tank cars were not free rolling at all, but controlled by the
lessor and lessee. To ascertain who owned what tank cars on line depends
on who the shipper's (or consignee's) lessor was if the tank car was not
shipper-owned. That will take a lot more homework to determine.

Hope this helps, Tim Gilbert


Bill Darnaby
 

Tim,

Thanks again for the analysis. It keeps me interested in releasing the data. The thing that surprised me were the 2 Canadian cars that were loaded and sent on their way. I had always heard that Canadian cars had to be returned to Canada either with a load or without. So much for that urban legend...

Bill Darnaby


Gregg Mahlkov <mahlkov@...>
 

Bill,

Both the Car Service Rules and US Customs regulations required that cars of Canadian ownership built in Canada be either loaded to Canada or returned empty to Canada. Same with Mexico. Eventually the railroad loading the car domestically within the US would have to pay duty and a fine to US Customs.

Although not germane to this list, this is why some Canadian railroads have more than one reporting mark, to differentiate between US built and Canadian built cars.

NAFTA finally changed this.

Gregg Mahlkov

----- Original Message -----
From: "william darnaby" <WDarnaby@worldnet.att.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, October 10, 2005 10:09 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: 1949 NKP Movements from Swift's Soy Bean Processing Operation in Frankfort IN


Tim,

Thanks again for the analysis. It keeps me interested in releasing the
data. The thing that surprised me were the 2 Canadian cars that were loaded
and sent on their way. I had always heard that Canadian cars had to be
returned to Canada either with a load or without. So much for that urban
legend...

Bill Darnaby






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Doug Rhodes
 

Use of a non duty paid conveyance to carry goods between two points within a country is "cabotage", which is indeed illegal in most countries. Thus, a freight car would normally move across the border to its destination, then reloaded or not, move more or less directly back across the border to avoid breaching the cabotage laws.

Two points come to mind from your data: first, the Canadian railroads had (and still have) cars on which duty WAS paid in the US. Today, these cars might have a distinct reporting mark (such as CPAA) to signify this, but I'm not aware of this reporting mark practice being widespread back in the 1940's. So the cars you have identified MAY have been legal for carriage of goods within the US (I don't have access to info tonight to comment on the specific cars.)

The other possibility is that one or more of these two car movements was in breach of the rules - "it happens", and there may have been other pressures at the time (boxcar shortage?)

So I'd be cautious about generalizing from this data to conclude that the cabotage laws were "urban legend" :-)

Doug Rhodes

----- Original Message -----
From: "william darnaby" <WDarnaby@worldnet.att.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, October 10, 2005 7:09 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: 1949 NKP Movements from Swift's Soy Bean Processing Operation in Frankfort IN


Tim,

Thanks again for the analysis. It keeps me interested in releasing the
data. The thing that surprised me were the 2 Canadian cars that were loaded
and sent on their way. I had always heard that Canadian cars had to be
returned to Canada either with a load or without. So much for that urban
legend...

Bill Darnaby




Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

william darnaby wrote:

Tim,

Thanks again for the analysis. It keeps me interested in releasing the
data. The thing that surprised me were the 2 Canadian cars that were loaded
and sent on their way. I had always heard that Canadian cars had to be
returned to Canada either with a load or without. So much for that urban
legend...
Bill,

Thanks for the kudo, and if you keep releasing more data, I will put all that data on a spreadsheet, cross reference the cars with the 4/1949 ORER, and do a bunch of summaries including geographic distribution of boxcars, consignees and other things now undetermined which might pop out at me. I can post the spreadsheet to the STMFPH Files so others can play (sort) with it to find out other things which interest them.

Regarding the two Canadian cars, CP #223472 which was loaded with bean meal and consigned to Gwinneville IN on the B&O via Indianapolis, and CN #522526 which was loaded with meal on 6/9/1948 for the Van Patten Co. of Allen MI via the PRR-Michigan Central. My 4/49 ORER does not distinguish between "American" cars on the Canadian roads so I have no idea of whether CP #223472 was American or Canadian; because CN's American cars were marked GTW or CV, I assume CN #522526 was Canadian.

I would argue that the "Canadian" urban legend was valid most of the time. If it was not valid, the number of Canadian Boxcars recorded as loads out of Swift-Frankfort would have been 9 or 10 instead of the two you have listed so far.

Meanwhile, thank you very much for sharing this information with us, Tim Gilbert


Tim O'Connor
 

CP #223472
This was a 10 panel 1937 "AAR" design box car with 5/5 ends (resin
part from Dan Kirlin/Sylvan) and "flat panel" roof (also Kirlin/Sylvan).
From series 221000-223949. Not sure of builder or date. AJAX brakes.
Jim Sands posted an excellent photo of one of these on his web site.

CN #522526
This was a 10 panel AAR style box car built by Canadian Car & Foundry
in 1948 (series 522500-523999) with 4/4 IDE-2 ends (rolling pin with
short top rib), 8-rung ladders and rectangular panel roof. This is a
match for the Intermountain "Canadian" box cars.

Tim O'Connor


Bill Darnaby
 

Hmmm...cabotage. A new word for me. I had hoped my comments would provoke <g> a good explaination and I got it. Thanks. I figured the loading of Canadian cars was probably a rules violation but I wasn't sure.

Bill Darnaby