Tank Cars


Thomas M. Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

List,

While we are on the subject of tank cars, I have a question about tank car that needs some identity. Steamtown in Scranton has a two compartment tank car lettered NATX 4750. A photo of this car appeared in the October 2005 issue of the NMRA "ScaleRails on page 31. On what appears to be the "B" end of the car, there is a capacity of 4577 gallons stenciled. On the sid it shows a Capacity of 80000 pounds, with a Light Weight of 37800 pounds. The lettering and the North American rectangular logo appears to be original as the car is in deplorable condition and has not been restored. It also looks like it is equipped with Barber spring-plankless solid bearing trucks. To prevent anyone climbing on the car the National Park Service has plated over the stirrup steps at all four corners.

Can anyone identify this car and know anything of it's history? My ORER's only date back to 1949 and do not show this particular car number in the North American listings.

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu


Gatwood, Elden <Elden.Gatwood@...>
 

Tom;
I do not have access to that document, but is this a riveted, or welded
car? Does it have wooden or steel running boards? NATX had lots of
oddball cars, but two-compartment cars are rare, nonetheless.

It sounds like one of the Pennzoil cars they had for additives/specialty
refinery products. The decent load capacity with low liquid volume
makes one suspect it was a car for something very heavy, like auto gas
"lead", or other heavy industrial liquids.

Is the logo the parallelogram on the side of the tank, or the smaller
name?

Thanks,

Elden

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Thomas M. Olsen
Sent: Tuesday, November 08, 2005 12:12 PM
To: Steam Freight Car List
Subject: [STMFC] RE: Tank Cars

List,

While we are on the subject of tank cars, I have a question about tank
car that needs some identity. Steamtown in Scranton has a two
compartment tank car lettered NATX 4750. A photo of this car appeared
in the October 2005 issue of the NMRA "ScaleRails on page 31. On what
appears to be the "B" end of the car, there is a capacity of 4577
gallons stenciled. On the sid it shows a Capacity of 80000 pounds, with

a Light Weight of 37800 pounds. The lettering and the North American
rectangular logo appears to be original as the car is in deplorable
condition and has not been restored. It also looks like it is equipped
with Barber spring-plankless solid bearing trucks. To prevent anyone
climbing on the car the National Park Service has plated over the
stirrup steps at all four corners.

Can anyone identify this car and know anything of it's history? My
ORER's only date back to 1949 and do not show this particular car number

in the North American listings.

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu





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Thomas M. Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

Eldon,

The car is riveted, has wooden running boards, and has the parallelogram with the name within on the side of the tank. As I do not have the capacity to make scans I can not at this time send you one. The tank also has a single long running board to service the tank domes. The photo is a 3/4 wedge shot taken from the end corner looking up so the built date is almost illegible, but appears ?? to be, perhaps, either 2-25 or 8-25!

Tom Olsen
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479

Gatwood, Elden wrote:

Tom;
I do not have access to that document, but is this a riveted, or welded
car? Does it have wooden or steel running boards? NATX had lots of
oddball cars, but two-compartment cars are rare, nonetheless.

It sounds like one of the Pennzoil cars they had for additives/specialty
refinery products. The decent load capacity with low liquid volume
makes one suspect it was a car for something very heavy, like auto gas
"lead", or other heavy industrial liquids.

Is the logo the parallelogram on the side of the tank, or the smaller
name?

Thanks,

Elden


-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Thomas M. Olsen
Sent: Tuesday, November 08, 2005 12:12 PM
To: Steam Freight Car List
Subject: [STMFC] RE: Tank Cars

List,

While we are on the subject of tank cars, I have a question about tank car that needs some identity. Steamtown in Scranton has a two compartment tank car lettered NATX 4750. A photo of this car appeared in the October 2005 issue of the NMRA "ScaleRails on page 31. On what appears to be the "B" end of the car, there is a capacity of 4577 gallons stenciled. On the sid it shows a Capacity of 80000 pounds, with

a Light Weight of 37800 pounds. The lettering and the North American rectangular logo appears to be original as the car is in deplorable condition and has not been restored. It also looks like it is equipped with Barber spring-plankless solid bearing trucks. To prevent anyone climbing on the car the National Park Service has plated over the stirrup steps at all four corners.

Can anyone identify this car and know anything of it's history? My ORER's only date back to 1949 and do not show this particular car number

in the North American listings.

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu




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Yahoo! Groups Links






Kevin Lafferty <kevinhlafferty@...>
 

Here's a link to a photo of the car in question.
http://www.northeast.railfan.net/images/natx4753.jpg

Kevin Lafferty

"Thomas M. Olsen" <tmolsen@UDel.Edu> wrote:
List,

While we are on the subject of tank cars, I have a question about tank
car that needs some identity. Steamtown in Scranton has a two
compartment tank car lettered NATX 4750. A photo of this car appeared
in the October 2005 issue of the NMRA "ScaleRails on page 31. On what
appears to be the "B" end of the car, there is a capacity of 4577
gallons stenciled. On the sid it shows a Capacity of 80000 pounds, with
a Light Weight of 37800 pounds. The lettering and the North American
rectangular logo appears to be original as the car is in deplorable
condition and has not been restored. It also looks like it is equipped
with Barber spring-plankless solid bearing trucks. To prevent anyone
climbing on the car the National Park Service has plated over the
stirrup steps at all four corners.

Can anyone identify this car and know anything of it's history? My
ORER's only date back to 1949 and do not show this particular car number
in the North American listings.

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu



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Bruce Smith
 

"Thomas M. Olsen" <tmolsen@UDel.Edu> wrote:

While we are on the subject of tank cars, I have a question about tank
car that needs some identity. Steamtown in Scranton has a two
compartment tank car lettered NATX 4750. <snip>
Can anyone identify this car and know anything of it's history? My
ORER's only date back to 1949 and do not show this particular car number
in the North American listings.
On Wed, November 9, 2005 5:59 am, Kevin Lafferty replied:
Here's a link to a photo of the car in question.
http://www.northeast.railfan.net/images/natx4753.jpg
Tom, Kevin,

This car is identifiable as a General American built car. The spotting
feature is the lack of side and end sills and the distinctive angled
braces on the end. The car appears to have been built as a 2 dome car,
and the capacity of each compartment stenciled on the respective ends and
domes.


Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Gatwood, Elden <Elden.Gatwood@...>
 

Kevin;
Thanks for that great scan!

Tom;
I agree with Bruce, and Kevin's scan indicates it is almost certainly an
early GATC product, and the bolsters, tank supports, angled draft gear
support brackets and all support that conclusion. GATC made lots of
tanks for NATC, which seems to have maintained the biggest oddball fleet
of any of the owners/lessors.

I don't know if there is a formal designation for this "model" of tank
car, but it is the one I associate with the group that immediately
precedes the Type 30, which shares a lot of the same features.

The parallelogram logo was a later addition, if I remember right. This
car does not appear in my 1964 ORER, either, but that low number series
tended to accumulate 2-compartment and 3-compartment cars. It may have
been an add-on through purchase, or perhaps a re-numbering after
expiration of a lease?

The single safety valves on each dome are interesting, as are the
unexplained rivets on the tank. I suspect this tank was created for
some odd commodity that is not that volatile, like ink, special
lubricating oil, or something like that. Lessors sometimes dictated the
nature of equipment like heating coils, vents and valves, or insulation.
The transverse mounting of the reservoir is also interesting.

There is nothing that resembles this car in model form. The tank is
very small, and being riveted, would require a big scratchbuilding
effort. The underframe vaguely resembles those on the Athearn and
Walthers tanks, which are exceedingly crude. The newer Overland radial
course GATC tank cars have some similarities, but are earlier GATC
products. The WA Drake car is a newer Type 30, if I remember correctly.

I hope this helps.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Thomas M. Olsen
Sent: Tuesday, November 08, 2005 10:48 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] RE: Tank Cars

Eldon,

The car is riveted, has wooden running boards, and has the parallelogram

with the name within on the side of the tank. As I do not have the
capacity to make scans I can not at this time send you one. The tank
also has a single long running board to service the tank domes. The
photo is a 3/4 wedge shot taken from the end corner looking up so the
built date is almost illegible, but appears ?? to be, perhaps, either
2-25 or 8-25!

Tom Olsen
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479

Gatwood, Elden wrote:

Tom;
I do not have access to that document, but is this a riveted, or welded
car? Does it have wooden or steel running boards? NATX had lots of
oddball cars, but two-compartment cars are rare, nonetheless.

It sounds like one of the Pennzoil cars they had for
additives/specialty
refinery products. The decent load capacity with low liquid volume
makes one suspect it was a car for something very heavy, like auto gas
"lead", or other heavy industrial liquids.

Is the logo the parallelogram on the side of the tank, or the smaller
name?

Thanks,

Elden


-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Thomas M. Olsen
Sent: Tuesday, November 08, 2005 12:12 PM
To: Steam Freight Car List
Subject: [STMFC] RE: Tank Cars

List,

While we are on the subject of tank cars, I have a question about tank
car that needs some identity. Steamtown in Scranton has a two
compartment tank car lettered NATX 4750. A photo of this car appeared
in the October 2005 issue of the NMRA "ScaleRails on page 31. On what
appears to be the "B" end of the car, there is a capacity of 4577
gallons stenciled. On the sid it shows a Capacity of 80000 pounds,
with

a Light Weight of 37800 pounds. The lettering and the North American
rectangular logo appears to be original as the car is in deplorable
condition and has not been restored. It also looks like it is equipped
with Barber spring-plankless solid bearing trucks. To prevent anyone
climbing on the car the National Park Service has plated over the
stirrup steps at all four corners.

Can anyone identify this car and know anything of it's history? My
ORER's only date back to 1949 and do not show this particular car
number

in the North American listings.

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu





Yahoo! Groups Links











Yahoo! Groups Links












Yahoo! Groups Links


Tony Thompson
 

Gatwood, Elden wrote:
The single safety valves on each dome are interesting, as are the
unexplained rivets on the tank. I suspect this tank was created for
some odd commodity that is not that volatile, like ink, special
lubricating oil, or something like that. Lessors sometimes dictated the
nature of equipment like heating coils, vents and valves, or insulation.
The transverse mounting of the reservoir is also interesting.
Buyers of tank cars did indeed choose many external features of cars, but safety valves were not among those; the rules called for one safety valve for up to 6000 gallons of many commodities (thus the need for two such valves on 12,500 gallon cars). Of course heating coils, insulation, and a variety of loading and unloading fixtures were specified by the buyer, but certain combinations thereof were required for certain commodities. There is an informative table on this topic in the back of Kaminski's book on AC&F tank cars.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history