Placing rivets


Manfred Lorenz
 

Placing rivets is probably as important as making them. The aircraft
modelers use this tool:

http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXHZ25&P=0

Manfred


Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Nov 9, 2005, at 9:34 AM, Manfred Lorenz wrote:

Placing rivets is probably as important as making them. The aircraft
modelers use this tool:

http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXHZ25&P=0
I would bet that the best tool for the brass rivets on posts that you and Dennis have referred to would be a good milling machine with an Albrecht keyless chuck for the very small drills. A digital readout would make this almost obscenely easy except for the cost of the rivets. I am going to inquire about a large scale purchase as these things are perfect for some applications.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
645 Tanner Marsh Road, Guilford, CT 06437
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912


Tim O'Connor
 

Manfred

I don't get it... how do you place a single rivet using a large template?

Tim O.

Placing rivets is probably as important as making them. The aircraft
modelers use this tool:

http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXHZ25&P=0

Manfred








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Manfred Lorenz
 

Tim,

The goal here is to space the rivet_s_ evenly. A common problem with
airplanes and railroad equipment. Was that your question?

It is not about application of singles.

But that makes me think: If a template with evenly spaced holes were
used one could fill those with a liquid rivet compound (white glue
diluted to a certain degree) to the top, wait until semi liquid and
lift off. Followed by a part melt down to form the rounded dome.
There is a kit that accomplishes this with a syringe and squeeze
bottles.

Manfred

--- In STMFC@..., timboconnor@c... wrote:

Manfred

I don't get it... how do you place a single rivet using a large
template?

Tim O.


Placing rivets is probably as important as making them. The
aircraft
modelers use this tool:

http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXHZ25&P=0

Manfred


Tim O'Connor
 

I see... so what is the template made of? It must be very flexible,
but also totally resistant to adhesives, and very very thin (.010?)
Is that true?

If so, I could tape down the template, and glue .010 styrene bits
in the holes. Then run an Xacto across the template, shaving the
"rivets" down to the thickness of the template. Then remove the
template and wash with Tenax per Andy Carlson's description,
to "melt" the tiny styrene cylinders into the shape of rivets.

Is that how you use it?

Tim O.

Tim,
The goal here is to space the rivet_s_ evenly. A common problem with
airplanes and railroad equipment. Was that your question?


Manfred Lorenz
 

This is what is written on that site:

NOTES FROM OUR TECH DEPARTMENT
This is a 5"x9" Template with Five Scales of Shapes and Rivet
Placement Lines.

FEATURES: Makes perfect panel lines, fuel caps, rivets, and other
shapes to create scale markings on your warbirds and other models.
Included rulers provide accurate measurements for five scales of
aircraft.

Ideal for use with the Top Flite Panel Line Pen.(TOPQ2510)

INCLUDES: One 5 x 9" Plastic Template

That is what I read and know. Thinking round fuselage I guess it
should be somewhat flexible. I just Google'd it, no personal
experience.

Manfred


--- In STMFC@..., timboconnor@c... wrote:

I see... so what is the template made of? It must be very flexible,
but also totally resistant to adhesives, and very very thin (.010?)
Is that true?

If so, I could tape down the template, and glue .010 styrene bits
in the holes. Then run an Xacto across the template, shaving the
"rivets" down to the thickness of the template. Then remove the
template and wash with Tenax per Andy Carlson's description,
to "melt" the tiny styrene cylinders into the shape of rivets.

Is that how you use it?

Tim O.


Tim,
The goal here is to space the rivet_s_ evenly. A common problem
with
airplanes and railroad equipment. Was that your question?


soolinehistory <dstorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Ted Culotta <tculotta@s...> wrote:

I would bet that the best tool for the brass rivets on posts that you
and Dennis have referred to would be a good milling machine with an
Albrecht keyless chuck for the very small drills. A digital readout
would make this almost obscenely easy except for the cost of the
rivets. I am going to inquire about a large scale purchase as these
things are perfect for some applications.

Regards,
Ted Culotta
Her's a source for the drill:

http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNSRIT?PMPXNO=1686302&PMT4NO=2590521

I also might note that Creative Model Associates (Tichy) has .008
diameter phosphor bronze wire, Walthers number 363-1100. The cut end
of spring wire can make a decent drill for resin and plastic, and is
less likely to break with hand use. I'd rather have steel, but this
phosphor bronze may hard enough to do the trick, and a lot cheaper
than the above drills.

Dennis Storzek


Marcelo Lordeiro <mrcustom@...>
 

This is the address to see a fantastic rivet embossing machine.
http://www.galtran.com/PRR_L2_Construction_Information/Rivet%20Machine/computer_controlled_rivet_emboss.htm
Marcelo Lordeiro

----- Original Message -----
From: "soolinehistory" <dstorzek@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, November 09, 2005 3:52 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Placing rivets


--- In STMFC@..., Ted Culotta <tculotta@s...> wrote:

I would bet that the best tool for the brass rivets on posts that you
and Dennis have referred to would be a good milling machine with an
Albrecht keyless chuck for the very small drills. A digital readout
would make this almost obscenely easy except for the cost of the
rivets. I am going to inquire about a large scale purchase as these
things are perfect for some applications.

Regards,
Ted Culotta
Her's a source for the drill:

http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNSRIT?PMPXNO=1686302&PMT4NO=2590521

I also might note that Creative Model Associates (Tichy) has .008
diameter phosphor bronze wire, Walthers number 363-1100. The cut end
of spring wire can make a decent drill for resin and plastic, and is
less likely to break with hand use. I'd rather have steel, but this
phosphor bronze may hard enough to do the trick, and a lot cheaper
than the above drills.

Dennis Storzek








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