Digest Number 2779


asychis@...
 

In a message dated 11/10/2005 3:00:22 AM Central Standard Time,
STMFC@... writes:
And I can tell you how to find it!

Publish a book on any railroad topic. Almost immediately after
publication the author will be contacted by someone who will want to
know why he wasn't consulted because he has ... whatever, something
the author couldn't find."

You can take this further.

If you ask for information, not everyone who has it will respond.

Publish what you know (or suspect) is incorrect and everyone who knows
better will hasten to ram the correct version down your throat!

So true, so true! I was amazed what I learned about Missouri Pacific
cabooses once I wrote a book on them! People came out of the woodwork. Most were
very helpful, a few had additional photos and knew about the book, but waited to
offer them after it was published, and a few took me to task in a rather
nasty way even though they knew the book was coming out for over a year. Such is
the way of things. At least I had the ability to publish corrections and
additional material in the MPHS Eagle.

Jerry Michels


Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Jerry,

At last, a MOPAC caboose expert!. I am curious to know if any MP "Gould Standard" wooden cabooses still survive. These are the same design as purchased or homebuilt by the D&RG and the WP. I know the MP had at least one series, I think built by AC&F in 1898. Plans were published in MR back in the 1940s. Erection drawings also are found in the Gregg Trainshed Cyclopedia reprints. I have seen or heard of five such cars from the WP still existing. Don't know about any D&RGW cars, though I photographed one in 1967 rotting in the desert near Blanca, Colorado. Any comments you can add would be of interest.

By the way, I coined the term "Gould Standard" and have always used it in quotes. It showed up in Jim Eager's WP Color Guide as an official term. Yes, the Gould roads had interchangeable designs, but unlike the Harriman lines, there was no official term for them AFAIK. Egg on his face and mine.

Model Railroading Warehouse is promising a kit for these cars "someday". I sent them plans and photos several years ago. Since I can't afford brass, I will make do with their somewhat archaic kit to do a couple from Sacramento Northern series 1621-1629 (all ex-WP). I'm glad I don't have to hold my breath while I wait for them.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff


asychis@... wrote:

. . . I was amazed what I learned about Missouri Pacific cabooses once I wrote a book on them . . . .
Jerry Michels


jerryglow2
 

This is the "other" or Florida Jerry and you might check Elvin
Klepzig's site http://www.trainweb.org/dbrr/index.html and
specifically http://www.trainweb.org/dbrr/cabsavedhtml/cabsaved.html

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., Garth Groff <ggg9y@v...> wrote:

Jerry,

At last, a MOPAC caboose expert!. I am curious to know if any
MP "Gould
Standard" wooden cabooses still survive. These are the same design
as
purchased or homebuilt by the D&RG and the WP. I know the MP had
at
least one series, I think built by AC&F in 1898. Plans were
published in
MR back in the 1940s. Erection drawings also are found in the
Gregg
Trainshed Cyclopedia reprints. I have seen or heard of five such
cars
from the WP still existing. Don't know about any D&RGW cars,
though I
photographed one in 1967 rotting in the desert near Blanca,
Colorado.
Any comments you can add would be of interest.

By the way, I coined the term "Gould Standard" and have always
used it
in quotes. It showed up in Jim Eager's WP Color Guide as an
official
term. Yes, the Gould roads had interchangeable designs, but unlike
the
Harriman lines, there was no official term for them AFAIK. Egg on
his
face and mine.

Model Railroading Warehouse is promising a kit for these
cars "someday".
I sent them plans and photos several years ago. Since I can't
afford
brass, I will make do with their somewhat archaic kit to do a
couple
from Sacramento Northern series 1621-1629 (all ex-WP). I'm glad I
don't
have to hold my breath while I wait for them.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff