GSC "Commonwealth" 54' Flat Cars.


Arnold van Heyst
 

Sirs,

For which railroad in mid 50's is this type correct?
http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/932-3776
(And i still don't have the 8.000 gallon UTLX car by Proto 2000,
who is willing to sell one of they're unbuiled kits?)

Regards,
Arnold van Heyst
Netherlands.


Tim O'Connor
 

1951 -- GM&O 72000-72049
1952 -- ATSF 93275-93286
ATSF 93300-93499
MKT 15301-15325
1953 GM&O several groups w/ bulkheads
1954 ATSF 93500-93799
RDG 9300-9356
WABASH 100-249 (spread out orders to 1956)

and no doubt others...

Tim O.

For which railroad in mid 50's is this type correct?
http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/932-3776
(And i still don't have the 8.000 gallon UTLX car by Proto 2000,
who is willing to sell one of they're unbuiled kits?)

Regards,
Arnold van Heyst
Netherlands.


Bill Kelly
 

Tim,
Not all GSC flats are created equal. These 1951 blt GM&O cars are 50 ton
cars and the side sill is different than the Walthers car. The steel
showing in the deck is also different. The deck of these '56 blt WABASH
cars is considerably different. The AT&SF 1952 Ft-W 93300-93499 and 1954
Ft-3 93500-93799 are very close to the Walthers car, the others I don't
know.
Later,
Bill Kelly


Tim wrote:


1951 -- GM&O 72000-72049
1952 -- ATSF 93275-93286
ATSF 93300-93499
MKT 15301-15325
1953 GM&O several groups w/ bulkheads
1954 ATSF 93500-93799
RDG 9300-9356
WABASH 100-249 (spread out orders to 1956)

and no doubt others...

Tim O.


Tim O'Connor
 

Bill, I'd be happy to have more details on the Wabash cars.. I've seen
photos of both bulkhead and open deck cars but I don't think I've seen
a good view of the deck of either style. The Wabash bought them over a
3 year period so there may be differences between cars.

I have a scan of GM&O 72000 and I can see now that the depth of the
sides is shallower, although the overall profile is the same. Know of
any other examples of 50 ton 53'6" GSC flats?

Tim O'Connor

Not all GSC flats are created equal. These 1951 blt GM&O cars are 50 ton
cars and the side sill is different than the Walthers car. The steel
showing in the deck is also different. The deck of these '56 blt WABASH
cars is considerably different. The AT&SF 1952 Ft-W 93300-93499 and 1954
Ft-3 93500-93799 are very close to the Walthers car, the others I don't
know.

Later,
Bill Kelly


Bill Kelly
 

Tim,
The profile is different. The GM&O car has a long straight middle section
to the side sill, running just over six stake pockets. It is shallower as
you pointed out. T&P also had cars of this early design. There are only
two major crossbearers. These are not the only 50 ton cars, the Walther's
type later design was also used for 50 ton cars, AT&SF Ft-W, Ft-3 and
Ft-5 class cars were 50 ton cars. In my notes I just call them early
design cars.

Because the Wabash cars were built over a three year span I don't have
enough info to make a decision. You're right, the early cars are probably
different then the later cars.

Later,
Bill Kelly


Tim wrote:

Bill, I'd be happy to have more details on the Wabash cars.. I've
seen photos of both bulkhead and open deck cars but I don't think I've
seen a good view of the deck of either style. The Wabash bought them
over
a 3 year period so there may be differences between cars.

I have a scan of GM&O 72000 and I can see now that the depth of the
sides is shallower, although the overall profile is the same. Know
of any other examples of 50 ton 53'6" GSC flats?

Tim O'Connor


Gatwood, Elden <Elden.Gatwood@...>
 

To add: The PRR F41 sub-classes, often modeled as a "standard"
(Walthers) GSC Commonwealth 70-t of late design, was also NOT of that
design, as the sills from the bolster to ends were shallower, the angle
on the first part of the fishbelly was necessarily steeper, there was no
access hole on the one side, and most noticeable (and most annoying to
model) is the arrangement of the deck outside of the bolsters, and the
visible stringers that extend toward the center of the car. The deck
outside the bolsters has three lateral structural members visible,
instead of two, with circular holes in each, dividing the decking into 4
separate sections. It is different enough from the other GSC offerings
to make the Walthers or Tichy cars stand-ins at best.

Aside from Jim Eager's article, there has really not been a thorough
analysis of these cars done, with the modeling options discussed. Given
their importance to the RR's that owned them and the number of RR's that
possessed them, I think it is just yet another example of the poor
attention paid to flats and gons in general, that we ought to be
addressing.

If we were to get an upgraded Walthers Commonwealth, a plastic 70-t AAR
flat, and some resin offerings of the variants we are discussing, we
would be much better off in modeling this sadly neglected freight car
type.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Bill Kelly
Sent: Wednesday, December 28, 2005 8:44 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] GSC "Commonwealth" 54' Flat Cars.

Tim,
The profile is different. The GM&O car has a long straight middle
section
to the side sill, running just over six stake pockets. It is shallower
as
you pointed out. T&P also had cars of this early design. There are only
two major crossbearers. These are not the only 50 ton cars, the
Walther's
type later design was also used for 50 ton cars, AT&SF Ft-W, Ft-3 and
Ft-5 class cars were 50 ton cars. In my notes I just call them early
design cars.

Because the Wabash cars were built over a three year span I don't have
enough info to make a decision. You're right, the early cars are
probably
different then the later cars.

Later,
Bill Kelly


Tim wrote:

Bill, I'd be happy to have more details on the Wabash cars.. I've
seen photos of both bulkhead and open deck cars but I don't think I've
seen a good view of the deck of either style. The Wabash bought them
over
a 3 year period so there may be differences between cars.

I have a scan of GM&O 72000 and I can see now that the depth of the
sides is shallower, although the overall profile is the same. Know
of any other examples of 50 ton 53'6" GSC flats?

Tim O'Connor



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