Stock Cars


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 27, 2005, at 1:34 PM, sshaffer wrote:

Livestock had to be off loaded every so many hours for feed and rest. On
the Santa Fe it was common practice to reload the livestock on a Santa Fe
car to continue the journey and send the foreign car home. So for now I see
no need for any but Santa Fe stock cars in the area I model. Though as I
gain knowledge of car movements, interchange, locations where the livestock
were fed and rested I may change my requirements.
Steve what area do you model? You're certainly correct that reloading stock into Santa Fe cars was common practice, but that assumes the stock was unloaded in the first place, which was often not the case (the rule was 18 hours, or 24 hours if the shipper signed a waiver, as many did). Offhand, I can't think of any part of the Santa Fe that wasn't frequented by off-line stock cars, as demonstrated by abundant photographic and documentary evidence.

Richard Hendrickson


ljack70117@...
 

On Dec 27, 2005, at 5:35 PM, Richard Hendrickson wrote:

On Dec 27, 2005, at 1:34 PM, sshaffer wrote:

Livestock had to be off loaded every so many hours for feed and rest.
On
the Santa Fe it was common practice to reload the livestock on a Santa
Fe
car to continue the journey and send the foreign car home. So for now
I see
no need for any but Santa Fe stock cars in the area I model. Though
as I
gain knowledge of car movements, interchange, locations where the
livestock
were fed and rested I may change my requirements.
Steve what area do you model? You're certainly correct that reloading
stock into Santa Fe cars was common practice, but that assumes the
stock was unloaded in the first place, which was often not the case
(the rule was 18 hours, or 24 hours if the shipper signed a waiver, as
many did). Offhand, I can't think of any part of the Santa Fe that
wasn't frequented by off-line stock cars, as demonstrated by abundant
photographic and documentary evidence.

Richard Hendrickson
When I was on the Un Pac in the late 40s and early 50s the on car time was 28 hours and 36 hours if release was signed. Also on both the Un Pac ad Santa Fe we put them back on the same cars they came off of.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 27, 2005, at 4:51 PM, Larry Jackman < ljack70117@adelphia.net>
wrote:

When I was on the Un Pac in the late 40s and early 50s the on car
time was 28 hours and 36 hours if release was signed. Also on both
the Un Pac ad Santa Fe we put them back on the same cars they came
off of.
Thanks for the correction, Larry; you're quite right about the
post-WW-II rules. The 18/24 hour rules I cited were in effect in
earlier years. 36 hours was ample time for the UP to get stock from
northern Utah to Los Angeles on its Day Livestock Service trains and
for the Santa Fe to move stock from New Mexico and Arizona to LA
without unloading the animals for food/water/rest – regardless of
whether they were in company or foreign-road stock cars.

Richard Hendrickson


ljack70117@...
 

On Dec 27, 2005, at 8:06 PM, Richard Hendrickson wrote:

On Dec 27, 2005, at 4:51 PM, Larry Jackman < ljack70117@adelphia.net>
wrote:

When I was on the Un Pac in the late 40s and early 50s the on car
time was 28 hours and 36 hours if release was signed. Also on both
the Un Pac ad Santa Fe we put them back on the same cars they came
off of.
Thanks for the correction, Larry; you're quite right about the
post-WW-II rules. The 18/24 hour rules I cited were in effect in
earlier years. 36 hours was ample time for the UP to get stock from
northern Utah to Los Angeles on its Day Livestock Service trains and
for the Santa Fe to move stock from New Mexico and Arizona to LA
without unloading the animals for food/water/rest – regardless of
whether they were in company or foreign-road stock cars.

Richard Hendrickson
One more thing. Those that were on the car for 36 hours could not be
reloaded for 10 hours. The sad part was they would be in such bad
shape from standing that long the all they wanted to do was lay down
and did not eat or drink for at least 8 hours and some were reloaded
in 10 hours with out taking water or food. It was a sad sight to see
them.
When we received car loads headed for the "Flint Hills" west of
Emporia and they were on short time they would get special handling.
We would have a train called, waiting for their train to arrive and
they would be out of town in less than one hour headed west to the
"Hills".
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net


Tim O'Connor
 

Richard Hendrickson wrote

36 hours was ample time for the UP to get stock from northern
Utah to Los Angeles on its Day Livestock Service trains ...
Actually, just barely enough time is more like it. The LA&SL was
UP's toughest territory, and 10-20 mph schedules were typical for
freight. UP got its money's worth out of "100 mile days" on that
route!


ljack70117@...
 

On Dec 27, 2005, at 8:52 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:


Richard Hendrickson wrote

36 hours was ample time for the UP to get stock from northern
Utah to Los Angeles on its Day Livestock Service trains ...
Actually, just barely enough time is more like it. The LA&SL was
UP's toughest territory, and 10-20 mph schedules were typical for
freight. UP got its money's worth out of "100 mile days" on that
route!
You over look the fact the stock trains would run with lighter trains and with faster engines and on single track have the right over every thing else. They could average 25/30 MPH and make it with time to spare. How many crew districts did the LA&SL have to LA?
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 27, 2005, at 5:52 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:


Richard Hendrickson wrote

36 hours was ample time for the UP to get stock from northern
Utah to Los Angeles on its Day Livestock Service trains ...
Actually, just barely enough time is more like it. The LA&SL was
UP's toughest territory, and 10-20 mph schedules were typical for
freight. UP got its money's worth out of "100 mile days" on that
route!
Yes, Tim, but the whole point of the dedicated DLS trains with roller bearings and four unit F-3s was to run the stock through from Ogden to Los Angeles fast enough that they would not have to be unloaded at Las Vegas for rest and water, and this was successfully achieved day-in, day-out in the late '40s and '50s.

Richard Hendrickson


Marcelo Lordeiro <mrcustom@...>
 

Which are your comments regarding the new Intermountain stock cars?
Marcelo Lordeiro

----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Hendrickson" <rhendrickson@opendoor.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, December 27, 2005 8:35 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Stock Cars


On Dec 27, 2005, at 1:34 PM, sshaffer wrote:

Livestock had to be off loaded every so many hours for feed and rest.
On
the Santa Fe it was common practice to reload the livestock on a Santa
Fe
car to continue the journey and send the foreign car home. So for now
I see
no need for any but Santa Fe stock cars in the area I model. Though
as I
gain knowledge of car movements, interchange, locations where the
livestock
were fed and rested I may change my requirements.
Steve what area do you model? You're certainly correct that reloading
stock into Santa Fe cars was common practice, but that assumes the
stock was unloaded in the first place, which was often not the case
(the rule was 18 hours, or 24 hours if the shipper signed a waiver, as
many did). Offhand, I can't think of any part of the Santa Fe that
wasn't frequented by off-line stock cars, as demonstrated by abundant
photographic and documentary evidence.

Richard Hendrickson





Yahoo! Groups Links