Carbide drill bits?


engnut2004 <gpierson@...>
 

Hi, all,

I'm mostly a listener but was wondering if anyone can comment on using
carbide drill bits in the #60 to #80 range. Are they too brittle?
Can they be used in hand-held chucks? I see sets of them at
attractive prices on e-bay but wonder if (at least in the small sizes
mentioned above) they are practical for model car building.

TIA,

George Pierson


ljack70117@...
 

On Feb 11, 2006, at 9:05 AM, engnut2004 wrote:

Hi, all,

I'm mostly a listener but was wondering if anyone can comment on using
carbide drill bits in the #60 to #80 range. Are they too brittle?
Can they be used in hand-held chucks? I see sets of them at
attractive prices on e-bay but wonder if (at least in the small sizes
mentioned above) they are practical for model car building.

TIA,

George Pierson
Carbide drills are brittle and are not as sharp as HSS. Carbide will not sharpen as sharp. Just the nature of carbide. You are wasting your money because they cost more than HSS. AS a machinist I would never use one for any thing with a Rockwell of less than 56 and never hand drill with one. They should be run at high speed.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net


Don Worthy
 

Guys I just received 3 packs of the "e-bay" bits. I don't know what type steel they are or even if they'er steel at all!!!!!
I've tried them and they are some dull...they won't go through plastic. Two broke so quick...I didn't even get a hole started!!!!
They are Chinese that is the only markings or information marked on the boxes.

They aren't even worth the chip price!!!!
Don Worthy
Ivey, Ga.

ljack70117@adelphia.net wrote:

On Feb 11, 2006, at 9:05 AM, engnut2004 wrote:

Hi, all,

I'm mostly a listener but was wondering if anyone can comment on using
carbide drill bits in the #60 to #80 range. Are they too brittle?
Can they be used in hand-held chucks? I see sets of them at
attractive prices on e-bay but wonder if (at least in the small sizes
mentioned above) they are practical for model car building.

TIA,

George Pierson
Carbide drills are brittle and are not as sharp as HSS. Carbide will
not sharpen as sharp. Just the nature of carbide. You are wasting
your money because they cost more than HSS. AS a machinist I would
never use one for any thing with a Rockwell of less than 56 and never
hand drill with one. They should be run at high speed.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net





SPONSORED LINKS
Train travel Freight car Canada train travel Train travel in italy North american

---------------------------------
YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


Visit your group "STMFC" on the web.

To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


---------------------------------





---------------------------------

What are the most popular cars? Find out at Yahoo! Autos


Jack Burgess
 

Larry wrote:
As a machinist I would never use one for any thing with a Rockwell of less
than 56 and never hand drill with one.

Part of the original question was about hand drilling with #61-80 bits. I
would disagree with a blanket statement about hand drilling with small
bits...I won't hand drill in steel and hand drilling in brass could take all
day but hand drilling plastic or resin is not a problem.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


ljack70117@...
 

On Feb 11, 2006, at 10:53 AM, Jack Burgess wrote:

Larry wrote:
As a machinist I would never use one for any thing with a Rockwell of less
than 56 and never hand drill with one.
This is about carbide. HSS is always sharper than carbide so HSS will drill faster and better than carbide in your plastic, resin or what ever when drilling by hand.!!!!!!!!!

Part of the original question was about hand drilling with #61-80 bits. I
would disagree with a blanket statement about hand drilling with small
bits...I won't hand drill in steel and hand drilling in brass could take all
day but hand drilling plastic or resin is not a problem.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net


Michael Watnoski
 

Greetings,

If these are the printed circuit board drills with 1/8" shafts,
they will snap if used in any hand tool. A lot of these are on
the market because they are too short for drilling a stack of
circuit boards after being sharpened numerous times.

Michael


engnut2004 wrote:


Hi, all,

I'm mostly a listener but was wondering if anyone can comment on using
carbide drill bits in the #60 to #80 range. Are they too brittle?
Can they be used in hand-held chucks? I see sets of them at
attractive prices on e-bay but wonder if (at least in the small sizes
mentioned above) they are practical for model car building.

TIA,

George Pierson


Yahoo! Groups Links




Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

...anyone can comment on using
carbide drill bits in the #60 to #80 range. Are they too brittle?
Can they be used in hand-held chucks?
They are pretty brittle, and in this regard I have not had good luck with them in hand-held chucks. In fact, I broke two within five minutes in this regard- never to be repeated except in a press.

Now others may be able to hold things more steady than I...

Denny

--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, California