B&O 50' Branchline cars


mopacfirst
 

I've put off building any Branchline 50' B&O cars until now, since as
soon as I did research on these I realized they would be more
complicated than average.
References: Ed Hawkins articles in RMJ, November 98 and August 99,
and a couple of photos of similar classes on rr-fallenflags.org.
Now for the questions: B&O 282000-282149, M-61, and 299300-299326, M-
61B, are 8' door riveted box, more or less Branchline out-of-the-box
except for Duryea underframe and Morton running board, and minor
changes to the sill tabs. I can't really tell how many crossties
there are, the deep ones that run under the centersill, but I'm
guessing four. Is this right or are there six? Is the triple valve
located under the left edge of the door? Are there any photos that
show this better? And, are these just about the last (maybe only)
50' box built with Duryea underframe? Were these cars mostly captive
or, especially a few years after being built, were they free-
runners? Did they get converted into anything else, within the
timeframe of this list?
B&O 288000-288698, M-65 double door. These don't seem to be Duryea
underframe. Did they have Morton running board?
Anything else useful to note about these cars?

Ron Merrick


jim_mischke <jmischke@...>
 

Several responses:

- I've put off building mine as well. The protoype Duryea
underframe imposes some major appearance changes on the model. Even
a resin conversion kit (yet not produced for a 50 foot car, much
less this one) does not change the annoying cross bearer changes
needed on the model shell. Research Bob Witt has been doing on
Duryea patents shows that Duryea underframes evolved significantly
over time. One size or one era does not fit all.

- In 1954, GATX built some 50-foot lease boxcars for itself (green
with a big diagonal yellow stripe) with Duryea underframes. At
least PRR and B&O availed themselves of some. These cars were more
likely to be the last new Duryea underfames built.

- Very captive. B&O used these in auto parts service, they were
tied to particular pairs of auto plants. By the road number. There
were also a multitude of subclasses based on the fixturing and racks
within.

- Having seen some parts lists for B&O freight car orders, B&O
spread their parts business around. Trucks, journals, running
boards, brake hangers, .... many parts were all split between
vendors. If you see one M-61 with a Morton running board, it
doesn't mean they all had them. Half could have had Ajax.
Sometimes this seems to be A-B testing (let's see which is best).
Mostly it is shipper schmoozing and recipriocity. The B&O traffic
salesmen don't want an icy reception from Morton when they call, or
come away empty handed thereupon, just because B&O has been buying
all Ajax running boards lately.






--- In STMFC@..., "mopacfirst" <ron.merrick@...> wrote:

I've put off building any Branchline 50' B&O cars until now, since
as
soon as I did research on these I realized they would be more
complicated than average.
References: Ed Hawkins articles in RMJ, November 98 and August
99,
and a couple of photos of similar classes on rr-fallenflags.org.
Now for the questions: B&O 282000-282149, M-61, and 299300-
299326, M-
61B, are 8' door riveted box, more or less Branchline out-of-the-
box
except for Duryea underframe and Morton running board, and minor
changes to the sill tabs. I can't really tell how many crossties
there are, the deep ones that run under the centersill, but I'm
guessing four. Is this right or are there six? Is the triple
valve
located under the left edge of the door? Are there any photos
that
show this better? And, are these just about the last (maybe only)
50' box built with Duryea underframe? Were these cars mostly
captive
or, especially a few years after being built, were they free-
runners? Did they get converted into anything else, within the
timeframe of this list?
B&O 288000-288698, M-65 double door. These don't seem to be Duryea
underframe. Did they have Morton running board?
Anything else useful to note about these cars?

Ron Merrick


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

jim_mischke wrote:
- In 1954, GATX built some 50-foot lease boxcars for itself (green
with a big diagonal yellow stripe) with Duryea underframes. At
least PRR and B&O availed themselves of some. These cars were more
likely to be the last new Duryea underfames built.
The article on these in Railway Age implied, but did not state exactly, that these were end-of-car cushioning devices. Is that true?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


mopacfirst
 

Actually, Jim answered my questions perfectly, which leads me to
think I might still put off building these particular models
considering I still have about 10 to 15 Branchline 50' cars still to
build.

I would note that an increasing number of these have side sill
contours, or something else, that are just a tad too different from
the prototype for my (mainly) skill in matching the paint when I need
to add more sill than the model has. Carving sill sections away has
gotten to be a frequently-practiced skill at my house.

That said, I'm grateful to Branchline for getting as close as they
did to so many useful cars. There are about 20 of the 50' cars now
in service here.

Ron Merrick


--- In STMFC@..., "jim_mischke" <jmischke@...> wrote:



Several responses:

- I've put off building mine as well. The protoype Duryea
underframe imposes some major appearance changes on the model.
Even
a resin conversion kit (yet not produced for a 50 foot car, much
less this one) does not change the annoying cross bearer changes
needed on the model shell. Research Bob Witt has been doing on
Duryea patents shows that Duryea underframes evolved significantly
over time. One size or one era does not fit all.

- In 1954, GATX built some 50-foot lease boxcars for itself (green
with a big diagonal yellow stripe) with Duryea underframes. At
least PRR and B&O availed themselves of some. These cars were more
likely to be the last new Duryea underfames built.

- Very captive. B&O used these in auto parts service, they were
tied to particular pairs of auto plants. By the road number. There
were also a multitude of subclasses based on the fixturing and
racks
within.

- Having seen some parts lists for B&O freight car orders, B&O
spread their parts business around. Trucks, journals, running
boards, brake hangers, .... many parts were all split between
vendors. If you see one M-61 with a Morton running board, it
doesn't mean they all had them. Half could have had Ajax.
Sometimes this seems to be A-B testing (let's see which is best).
Mostly it is shipper schmoozing and recipriocity. The B&O traffic
salesmen don't want an icy reception from Morton when they call, or
come away empty handed thereupon, just because B&O has been buying
all Ajax running boards lately.




--- In STMFC@..., "mopacfirst" <ron.merrick@> wrote:

I've put off building any Branchline 50' B&O cars until now,
since
as
soon as I did research on these I realized they would be more
complicated than average.
References: Ed Hawkins articles in RMJ, November 98 and August
99,
and a couple of photos of similar classes on rr-fallenflags.org.
Now for the questions: B&O 282000-282149, M-61, and 299300-
299326, M-
61B, are 8' door riveted box, more or less Branchline out-of-the-
box
except for Duryea underframe and Morton running board, and minor
changes to the sill tabs. I can't really tell how many crossties
there are, the deep ones that run under the centersill, but I'm
guessing four. Is this right or are there six? Is the triple
valve
located under the left edge of the door? Are there any photos
that
show this better? And, are these just about the last (maybe
only)
50' box built with Duryea underframe? Were these cars mostly
captive
or, especially a few years after being built, were they free-
runners? Did they get converted into anything else, within the
timeframe of this list?
B&O 288000-288698, M-65 double door. These don't seem to be
Duryea
underframe. Did they have Morton running board?
Anything else useful to note about these cars?

Ron Merrick


Gregg Mahlkov <mahlkov@...>
 

jim_mischke wrote:


Mostly it is shipper schmoozing and recipriocity. The B&O traffic
salesmen don't want an icy reception from Morton when they call, or
come away empty handed thereupon, just because B&O has been buying
all Ajax running boards lately.

--------------------------------------------

Having been a railroad traffic representative, I can say that such a thought would likely result in the termination or at least the reprimand of the Traffic Manager of Morton, and the Sales Representative of the B&O.

At one time, the PRR included a Postal Reply Card in a mailing to shippers that asked "What can the PRR do to handle more of your shipments?" An assistant at a tire company replied "Buy more of our tires for your piggyback trailers." That Postal Reply Card reverberated all over both companies and reached the presidential suites. It was destroyed and all who were aware of it were sworn to silence.

The ICC took a very dim view of such "reciprocity."

Gregg Mahlkov
Florida's Forgotten Coast


Tony Thompson
 

Jim Mischke wrote:
-  Having seen some parts lists for B&O freight car orders, B&O
spread their parts business around.  Trucks, journals, running
boards, brake hangers,  .... many parts were all split between
vendors.  If you see one M-61 with a Morton running board, it
doesn't mean they all had them.  Half could have had Ajax. 
Sometimes this seems to be A-B testing (let's see which is best). 
Mostly it is shipper schmoozing and recipriocity.  The B&O traffic
salesmen don't want an icy reception from Morton when they call, or
come away empty handed thereupon, just because B&O has been buying
all Ajax running boards lately.
If you think the railroad's traffic salesmen can dictate to the
mechanical department, you would be mistaken on most railroads. OTOH
the railroad DOES like to have multiple vendors, for obvious reasons,
and at times of heavy car construction, shortages or delayed production
may force use of multiple sources for a particular specialty, to get
cars completed in a reasonable time. It's true, of course, that a
certain amount of schmoozing takes place in every business, but that
doesn't mean it affects purchasing of things like specialties more than
slightly--especially if it is traffic or operating people who are
schmoozing, instead of mechanical people.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Tim O'Connor
 

"jim_mischke" wrote

If you see one M-61 with a Morton running board, it doesn't
mean they all had them. Half could have had Ajax. Sometimes
this seems to be A-B testing (let's see which is best).
That's a valid rhetorical point, but as far as I know, all of the
B&O M-61 series had MORTON rb's. The first 500 had MINER handbrakes
and the rest had UNIVERSAL handbrakes. This in spite of the first
500 being split across two ACF lots.

Tim O.


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jim Mischke wrote:
If you see one M-61 with a Morton running board, it doesn't mean they all had them. Half could have had Ajax. Sometimes this seems to be A-B testing (let's see which is best).

I think it was more commonly "spreading the wealth." Many roads continued to split orders for specialties long after any reasonable testing would have been concluded. Right after WW II, there was another factor: shortages. You had to order whatever you could get.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history