General covered hopper questions (Was: Re: Frico PS2)


David Smith <dsmith@...>
 

Maybe it's just semantics, but it's not the Frisco itself that would be
doing the shipping - it would be some industry to whom the car happened
to get delivered, perhaps not even on the Frisco which begs the broader
question...

Did covered hoppers, like boxcars, travel widely or did they stay closer
to home?

Also, were covered hoppers ever used on an LCL basis or were they
restricted to serving large industries?

The D&H shipped a lot of cement in covered hoppers from online plants,
but it's not clear if any would have ended up on the Chateauguay branch,
which (except for a mine and pig iron furnace) served primarily small
towns.

Dave Smith



I have a Kadee Frisco PS2 (No. 84084, if that matters).
What would
the Frisco have been shipping in
these cars?

SGL


Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

David Smith wrote:

Maybe it's just semantics, but it's not the Frisco itself that would be
doing the shipping - it would be some industry to whom the car happened
to get delivered, perhaps not even on the Frisco which begs the broader
question...

Did covered hoppers, like boxcars, travel widely or did they stay closer
to home?
Compared to boxcars, covered hoppers were difficult to clean; hence, railroad-owned covered hoppers were usually returned to their point of origin empty while most empty boxcars were reloaded before they returned to home rails. Accordingly, railroad-owned covered hoppers were more tethered to their home road than boxcars.

That does not answer the question as to how far from point of origin they ranged. That depends upon the commodity carried. For a covered hopper in cement service, that range was limited because the cost of transportation, and thus, total cost of the product to the consumer, escalated the further away from their point of origin - cement being a low value commodity with widespread cement plants nation wide.

Grain hoppers might be a different story, but this would be a question for the Baby Boomers (1960's) Group. I suppose that covered hoppers could be wide ranging although less than boxcars because of the special tariffs & rules that related to grain movement.


Also, were covered hoppers ever used on an LCL basis or were they
restricted to serving large industries?
Not LCL. I remember seeing in the 1970's covered hoppers full of cement being unloaded at the team track in Westport CT. The cement was pumped from the freight car to a dry cement truck of a contractor and immediately hauled away.


The D&H shipped a lot of cement in covered hoppers from online plants,
but it's not clear if any would have ended up on the Chateauguay branch,
which (except for a mine and pig iron furnace) served primarily small
towns.
Any roads built in the area? The cement would be then augmented with a low cost aggregate.

Tim Gilbert


Schuyler Larrabee
 

On Behalf Of David Smith

Maybe it's just semantics, but it's not the Frisco itself
that would be doing the shipping - it would be some industry
to whom the car happened to get delivered, perhaps not even
on the Frisco which begs the broader question...
Like "Frico," that is something I noticed when I read my own note coming back to me. Last night,
for some reason, 11:30 seemed to be Very Late.

SGL


Chet French <cfrench@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...> wrote:

David Smith wrote:<SNIP>

Did covered hoppers, like boxcars, travel widely or did they stay
closer
to home?
Compared to boxcars, covered hoppers were difficult to clean;
hence,
railroad-owned covered hoppers were usually returned to their point
of
origin empty while most empty boxcars were reloaded before they
returned
to home rails. Accordingly, railroad-owned covered hoppers were
more
tethered to their home road than boxcars.

That does not answer the question as to how far from point of
origin
they ranged. That depends upon the commodity carried. For a covered
hopper in cement service, that range was limited because the cost
of
transportation, and thus, total cost of the product to the
consumer,
escalated the further away from their point of origin - cement
being a
low value commodity with widespread cement plants nation wide.<SNIP>

The IC, in the late 1950's, had 440 home road covered hoppers in a
pool to protect cement loading at four cement plants in Northern
Illinois on their Amboy District. Most of the loading went to
distribution silos in the Chicago and Milwaukee areas. Single car
loads went to Redi-Mix plants in Illinois and Wisconsin, and
occasionally multi cars shipments went to road or airport
construction projects. The longest trips for the cars was between
two and three hundred miles. The C&NW also served the Medusa plant
in Dixon and used their CH's for loading on their line. The Rock
Island served one of the three plants in the LaSalle/Oglesby area
using their own cars as did the MILW serving the Marquette Mill in
Oglesby. If the IC ran low on cars, or cement loading was heavy,
they would borrow cars from the CNW and MILW, especially if much of
the cement was being interchanged to the CNW at Dixon or the MILW at
Forreston. One year, beyond the time of this list, the IC borrowed
cars from the ATSF even though none of the cement was given to the
ATSF.

Chet French
Dixon, IL