Files get dull


pullmanboss <tgmadden@...>
 

This is not news and will no doubt provide no revalations to most
STMFC members, but files are among the tools we tend to to ignore as
they age. I do more filing of resin castings than most people and keep
my files scrupulously clean. Even so, I recently replaced my laminate
file, my mainstay tool for filing the backs of castings to remove
flash, and the improvement in material removal rate was amazing. Yeah,
I know, files are cutting tools and eventually become dull and should
be replaced like saw, knife or razor blades. But they're like a car's
shock absorbers, degrading so slowly that you don't really notice how
bad they've gotten until they're replaced.

Tom Madden


Michael Aufderheide
 

Tom,

Tell me what your laminate file looks like. It sounds useful. A google search turned up filing cabinets!

Mike

pullmanboss <tgmadden@...> wrote: This is not news and will no doubt provide no revalations to most
STMFC members, but files are among the tools we tend to to ignore as
they age. I do more filing of resin castings than most people and keep
my files scrupulously clean. Even so, I recently replaced my laminate
file, my mainstay tool for filing the backs of castings to remove
flash, and the improvement in material removal rate was amazing. Yeah,
I know, files are cutting tools and eventually become dull and should
be replaced like saw, knife or razor blades. But they're like a car's
shock absorbers, degrading so slowly that you don't really notice how
bad they've gotten until they're replaced.

Tom Madden





SPONSORED LINKS
Train travel Freight car Canada train travel Train travel in italy North american

---------------------------------
YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


Visit your group "STMFC" on the web.

To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@...

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


---------------------------------





---------------------------------
How low will we go? Check out Yahoo! Messenger’s low PC-to-Phone call rates.


Andy Carlson
 

Go to a Home Depot or Ace Hardware. A laminate file looks like a Mill File, but it typically has straight sides, one edge is serrated, the other smooth (a useful feature). The cut of the "teeth" is specific for plastics, and works very well. One of my most favorite items, and I got my first one recommended by Bob Schlieker of Rail Model Journal fame.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

Mike Aufderheide <mononinmonon@...> wrote: Tom,

Tell me what your laminate file looks like. It sounds useful. A google search turned up filing cabinets!

Mike

pullmanboss wrote: This is not news and will no doubt provide no revalations to most
STMFC members, but files are among the tools we tend to to ignore as
they age. I do more filing of resin castings than most people and keep
my files scrupulously clean. Even so, I recently replaced my laminate
file, my mainstay tool for filing the backs of castings to remove
flash, and the improvement in material removal rate was amazing. Yeah,
I know, files are cutting tools and eventually become dull and should
be replaced like saw, knife or razor blades. But they're like a car's
shock absorbers, degrading so slowly that you don't really notice how
bad they've gotten until they're replaced.

Tom Madden





SPONSORED LINKS
Train travel Freight car Canada train travel Train travel in italy North american

---------------------------------
YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


Visit your group "STMFC" on the web.

To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@...

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


---------------------------------





---------------------------------
How low will we go? Check out Yahoo! Messenger�s low PC-to-Phone call rates.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




Yahoo! Groups Links










[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Tim O'Connor
 

Tom Madden wrote

I recently replaced my laminate file, my mainstay tool for
filing the backs of castings to remove flash, and the improvement
in material removal rate was amazing.
That's why I bought TWO of those files in Boulder, Tom! :-)
I haven't seen anything like them at Home Depot around here.

Tim O'Connor


pullmanboss <tgmadden@...>
 

Mike Aufderheide asked:

Tell me what your laminate file looks like. It sounds useful. A
google search turned up filing cabinets!

And Andy Carlson responded:

Go to a Home Depot or Ace Hardware. A laminate file looks like a
Mill File, but it typically has straight sides, one edge is
serrated, the other smooth (a useful feature). The cut of
the "teeth" is specific for plastics, and works very well. One of my
most favorite items, and I got my first one recommended by Bob
Schlieker of Rail Model Journal fame.
10" Simonds all-purpose paddle handle file. You can find them on J&L
Industrial Supply's web site, item number SII-18800J. The file is 10"
long plus handle, 1" wide and 1/8" thick, uniform width & thickness
for the entire cutting length. Fine cut on one side, coarse on the
other, one blind edge as Andy said. The paddle handle makes it very
easy to, well, ..handle. Much easier than a tang. Just over ten bucks
each.

The "laminate file" name came from Bob Schleicher's long-ago article,
because he got his at McGukin's Hardware in Boulder, and that's what
McGukin's calls them. I live in Boulder and Tim bought his on a visit
here. I've gone through four of them so far.

Tom Madden


Andy Carlson
 

An interesting note:

I have used these formica files for years, and like them very much. But like most files, I find myself using a sanding block much more often, mostly because of the much greater control. I use the sanding block from a NWSL True-Sander, very seldom using the base board, just the sanding block. It is an aluminum extrusion which one applies self-sticking sandpaper strips to it. Free hand control is easily learned, and this is my favorite way to square of cuts of plastic, assuring absolute straight edges. Files seem to round off the corners too easily for me.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Paul Lyons
 

Tom, I am curious as to how you use the laminate file. I have one and use it a lot on the long edges of large castings, but I have never tried it on the "backs" as your earlier post suggests.

Paul Lyons
Laguna Niguel

-----Original Message-----
From: pullmanboss <tgmadden@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wed, 3 May 2006 23:26:14 -0000
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Files get dull


Mike Aufderheide asked:

Tell me what your laminate file looks like. It sounds useful. A
google search turned up filing cabinets!

And Andy Carlson responded:

Go to a Home Depot or Ace Hardware. A laminate file looks like a
Mill File, but it typically has straight sides, one edge is
serrated, the other smooth (a useful feature). The cut of
the "teeth" is specific for plastics, and works very well. One of my
most favorite items, and I got my first one recommended by Bob
Schlieker of Rail Model Journal fame.
10" Simonds all-purpose paddle handle file. You can find them on J&L
Industrial Supply's web site, item number SII-18800J. The file is 10"
long plus handle, 1" wide and 1/8" thick, uniform width & thickness
for the entire cutting length. Fine cut on one side, coarse on the
other, one blind edge as Andy said. The paddle handle makes it very
easy to, well, ..handle. Much easier than a tang. Just over ten bucks
each.

The "laminate file" name came from Bob Schleicher's long-ago article,
because he got his at McGukin's Hardware in Boulder, and that's what
McGukin's calls them. I live in Boulder and Tim bought his on a visit
here. I've gone through four of them so far.

Tom Madden







Yahoo! Groups Links


ljack70117@...
 

I worked in the machine shops for 40 years, We never tosed a file away ever. When they got to dull for steel, we used them on brass, then on aluminum, then on anything else. The secret of a file is knowing how to use it. It is ALWAYS a TWO handed job. The best way to ruin a file it to use it in one hand and drag it backward. To bring a file back you raise it so it does not touch the work and then put down on the work for the next cut. Even a small pattern file is a two handed job. I can not remember all the Pantograph patterns I have made sitting at a vise with my pattern in it and filling for hours.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@...

On May 3, 2006, at 7:26 PM, pullmanboss wrote:

Mike Aufderheide asked:

Tell me what your laminate file looks like. It sounds useful. A
google search turned up filing cabinets!

And Andy Carlson responded:

Go to a Home Depot or Ace Hardware. A laminate file looks like a
Mill File, but it typically has straight sides, one edge is
serrated, the other smooth (a useful feature). The cut of
the "teeth" is specific for plastics, and works very well. One of my
most favorite items, and I got my first one recommended by Bob
Schlieker of Rail Model Journal fame.
10" Simonds all-purpose paddle handle file. You can find them on J&L
Industrial Supply's web site, item number SII-18800J. The file is 10"
long plus handle, 1" wide and 1/8" thick, uniform width & thickness
for the entire cutting length. Fine cut on one side, coarse on the
other, one blind edge as Andy said. The paddle handle makes it very
easy to, well, ..handle. Much easier than a tang. Just over ten bucks
each.

The "laminate file" name came from Bob Schleicher's long-ago article,
because he got his at McGukin's Hardware in Boulder, and that's what
McGukin's calls them. I live in Boulder and Tim bought his on a visit
here. I've gone through four of them so far.

Tom Madden







Yahoo! Groups Links







ljack70117@...
 

Two things I forgot in my last post. The "Blind edge" as you call it is called a "Safe edge" in the machine shop and you never use a file with a bare tang. You ALWAYS put a file handle on it. I have seen pictures where the machinist had a file shoved through the palm of his hand and through the wrist and in to his arm when using one with out a handle. I would bet that hurt.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@...

On May 3, 2006, at 7:26 PM, pullmanboss wrote:

Mike Aufderheide asked:

Tell me what your laminate file looks like. It sounds useful. A
google search turned up filing cabinets!

And Andy Carlson responded:

Go to a Home Depot or Ace Hardware. A laminate file looks like a
Mill File, but it typically has straight sides, one edge is
serrated, the other smooth (a useful feature). The cut of
the "teeth" is specific for plastics, and works very well. One of my
most favorite items, and I got my first one recommended by Bob
Schlieker of Rail Model Journal fame.
10" Simonds all-purpose paddle handle file. You can find them on J&L
Industrial Supply's web site, item number SII-18800J. The file is 10"
long plus handle, 1" wide and 1/8" thick, uniform width & thickness
for the entire cutting length. Fine cut on one side, coarse on the
other, one blind edge as Andy said. The paddle handle makes it very
easy to, well, ..handle. Much easier than a tang. Just over ten bucks
each.

The "laminate file" name came from Bob Schleicher's long-ago article,
because he got his at McGukin's Hardware in Boulder, and that's what
McGukin's calls them. I live in Boulder and Tim bought his on a visit
here. I've gone through four of them so far.

Tom Madden




pullmanboss <tgmadden@...>
 

Paul Lyons asked:

Tom, I am curious as to how you use the laminate file. I have one
and use it a lot on the long edges of large castings, but I have
never tried it on the "backs" as your earlier post suggests.
For production casting I cast flat-back parts in closed multi-cavity
molds whenever possible (replacement ends for CV stock cars for the
NP Society; sides, ends & doors for the Northern Specific Models NP
stock cars; Pullman ice A/C sumps for NERS; etc.). That way the
castings come out of the mold the same thickness as the patterns. I
use the laminate file to remove nubs of gates & vents from the flat
sides of such parts. That's my major use.

For kit assembly, I'll use the file rather than sandpaper to remove
small castings from flash sheets. Lay the file on the workbench,
fine side up, and with your finger on the casting rub it back &
forth on the file until it comes free of the flash. I find that
small castings come out more uniform in thickness than when I use
sandpaper. Maybe if the sandpaper was bonded to a surface plate it
would do as well, but I've never had a lot of success maintaining
uniform thickness when holding 320 or 400 grit paper down with one
hand while trying to sweep a small casting back & forth with the
other. Large castings, yes, but small ones usually wind up wedge-
shaped. And of course, like you, I use the file for trueing long
edges on kit castings.

Tom Madden


James Eckman
 

10" Simonds all-purpose paddle handle file. You can find them on J&L Industrial Supply's web site, item number SII-18800J. The file is 10" long plus handle, 1" wide and 1/8" thick, uniform width & thickness for the entire cutting length. Fine cut on one side, coarse on the other, one blind edge as Andy said. The paddle handle makes it very easy to, well, ..handle. Much easier than a tang. Just over ten bucks each.

Tom Madden
I looked up the Simonds and it didn't seem like it was specific to plastics. Are the teeth really different from an ordinary mill file? I will look for one locally so I can see the teeth up close. How's J&Ls service? They have a great selection/catalog.

I worked in the machine shops for 40 years, We never tosed a file away ever. When they got to dull for steel, we used them on brass, then on aluminum, then on anything else. Larry Jackman
ljack70117@...
Take Larry's advice for how to file. The only exception is that I start out my files on brass instead of on steel. It's supposed to help the files last longer according to the clockmaking crowd, I always buy American or Swiss files and they last fairly long anyway since I rarely use them on cast iron or other nasty materials. I find the standard mill files OK for plastics and resins, but if I find something better, I certainly would start using it!

You ALWAYS put a file handle on it.
I have an assortment of file handles on hand, when I get a file with a tang I immediately stick a handle on. The paddle handle looks safe to use without one though...

Jim Eckman


 

10" Simonds all-purpose paddle handle file. You can find them on J&L
Industrial Supply's web site, item number SII-18800J. The file is 10"
long plus handle, 1" wide and 1/8" thick, uniform width & thickness
for the entire cutting length. Fine cut on one side, coarse on the
other, one blind edge as Andy said. The paddle handle makes it very
easy to, well, ..handle. Much easier than a tang. Just over ten bucks
each.

The "laminate file" name came from Bob Schleicher's long-ago article,
because he got his at McGukin's Hardware in Boulder, and that's what
McGukin's calls them. I live in Boulder and Tim bought his on a visit
here. I've gone through four of them so far.
Tom -
Two questions -
I'm finding a laminate file here : http://www.cabinetmart.com/05-60700.html
Is this the same file you referred to as the "laminate file" in the second
paragraph above?

I also checked the J&L tool. I like the idea of the paddle handle better,
but I'm curious whether you use the coarse side much. I've always used a new
12" single cut mill file for plastics. Except for the paddle handle and the
constant width, I wonder if I'm not just as well off, since I can use both
sides. I have never tried a coarse cut file because I was concerned about
taking too much material off at one time.

Thanks for your time in helping us and thanks to all for tolerating
additional questions.

Dan Stinson
Helena, Montana


Michael Watnoski
 

Greetings All,

Another consideration for keeping files sharp is the way they
are stored. A pile of files in a drawer will dull every time
they rub against each other as you open your toolbox. Files
should be kept in a vinyl sleeve, or wrapped in paper, when not
in use. Some claim a bit of stick chalk in the teeth will
prevent soft metals from clogging them. Keep the teeth clean
with a file card (a stiff flat metal brush).

Michael