Grabirons on Planos - how I do them


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Perhaps you'll share your method . . .

Dan Stinson
Helena, Montana
OK, that's fair.

Since I only asked about the grabirons, it goes like this: First I bend up the grabs themselves
from .010" wire. I may change over to .008" I find it necessary to make sure that they are
absolutely<< the right dimensions to fall into the etched holes and lay there perfectly. I rather
wish these came with the boards.

I leave the laterals in the fret, catch the edge of that in the Panavise laid over so it will hold
them level. Put the grabs into the laterals, then put a piece of paper or something over them so as
to hold them in the holes while I remove the whole arrangement from the vise and turn it over. Then
carefully place that down on the worktop. Then I use a solder that works with stainless (Andy S
mentioned Tix, which is good; I have something else that has lost its markings, but I know it works
with stainless.) and I get the ends of the grabs (which are about 1/8th inch long) gobbed with a
small blob of solder. Usually, I could now pick up the whole arrangement, and they don't fall out.

Then I slide a spacer in between the grab and the lateral, so that it's on top of the grab, which is
on the worktop, and under the lateral. Usually, I have an exacto chisel blade handy, and those are
.025" thick, which is pretty close. I might ask a machinist friend of mine to make me some small
bits of .030" aluminum, so solder wouldn't stick, but that's not been a problem . . .so far. So, I
get the blade in there, and put some weight onto the whole arrangement to make it all parallel, and
put a bit of the flux onto the lateral >right< at the spot where the attachment is to be made, using
a fine brush. Apply pencil iron, which has been wiped free of excess solder, and hope it works. If
you don't wipe off the iron, you'll fill in the holes (don't ask how I know). That unspeakable
corner part? I've done these with another piece of wire, tinned, stuck through the hole, and I
attempt to angle it just . . .so . . .so that it will hit the grab. Sometimes I'm lucky, and it
solders to the grab, too, as well as the lateral. Sometimes they don't hit the lateral, which is an
evening-ruiner, but I've managed to carefully bend them to be close. Once I have one lateral done,
I cut it free from the fret, as I don't want that hot iron waving around one that's finished. On
one or two cars, I've bridged the gap between the unspeakable support and the grab with a tiny drop
of epoxy.

When both are finished, I trim off the parts sticking out of the bottom of the lateral, and file it
flat with a fine file. Only occasionally will one come loose, and this is fixable with a careful
touch of the iron. I then attach the lateral to the brass support frame with ACC. I have some
concerns about the flux that makes the solder work with the stainless causing problems with the
paint, later, but OTOH, not enough to make me go wash these things off . . .

Until I read Ted's 1932 book, that was good enough, but now I see how the unspeakable corner
support's supposed to be wrapped around the grab. (gee, thanks Ted! 8^) ) Bill Darnaby's method
sound good, and it's what Tim B O'Connor does, so I'll look at that. PSC also makes tiny versions
of lift rings, which I'll also examine.

So, then there's how to attach the board to the car, and I now follow Dr Denny's advice to use Barge
Cement. Tim B suggests using Micro-clear (or whatever that window stuff is called) as an adhesive,
but I've not tried that. Attach the main running board, and then the laterals. Now, how do others
do this? I've been able to attach the completed lateral to the main with ACC, sometimes, and
sometimes not. Sometimes I use Barge Cement here, too. I find it's much easier to attach the angle
supports below the ends of the boards with Barge Cement than to try to drill the holes called for by
the directions.

SGL


ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Schuyler Larrabee" <r, and I now follow
Dr Denny's advice to use Barge
Cement.
Does that barge cement make stringers like Walthers Goo?

Ed


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Does that barge cement make stringers like Walthers Goo?

Ed
Well, yeah. Denny can tell this better, I think, but he drills a hole through the cap which he
plugs with a T-pin so he gets a tiny bit at a time. I've not gotten 'round to that yet, though I
intend to try that. I just use a hatpin, dip it into the Barge Cement at the top of the tube, and
then spin the pin till I break off the string. Then I apply this tiny amount to whatever . . .

SGL


bdg1210 <Bruce_Griffin@...>
 

I will keep this brief as it will not benefit the group as a whole.
Thanks Denny for sharing your technique as it specifically gives me a
good technique to learn from and also reminds me to use the same
precision I would use at work with my modeling techniques. It's the
details that make the difference.

Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin
Summerfield, NC

--- In STMFC@..., "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., "Schuyler Larrabee" <r, and I now follow
Dr Denny's advice to use Barge
Cement.
Does that barge cement make stringers like Walthers Goo?

Ed