Athearn's New HO Three-Bay Covered Hoppers


Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

Just a few months ago Athearn released an HO-scale PS2 three-bay
covered hopper (Stock # 2893). The prototype for the model was the
covered hopper Pullman-Standard began producing beginning in the 1950s.

One of the statements on the Athearn website says that these hoppers
were "Designed to carry bulk commodities, such as grain, cement and
plastic."

It seems to me that this car, fully loaded, would have been incapable
of handling the weight of such a dense commodity as cement.

Can anyone confirm this?

Thank you.

Bob Chaparro
Mission Viejo, Ca


Brian Paul Ehni <behni@...>
 

It would never be fully loaded with cement. Back in the day, hopper cars
used to have painted lines indicating the level of various commodities.

Cement, being more dense, would not literally fill the cubic space of the
car. Other commodities certainly could (and did).
--

Brian Ehni

From: Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@yahoo.com>
Reply-To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 03 Jun 2006 16:52:52 -0000
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Athearn's New HO Three-Bay Covered Hoppers

Just a few months ago Athearn released an HO-scale PS2 three-bay
covered hopper (Stock # 2893). The prototype for the model was the
covered hopper Pullman-Standard began producing beginning in the 1950s.

One of the statements on the Athearn website says that these hoppers
were "Designed to carry bulk commodities, such as grain, cement and
plastic."

It seems to me that this car, fully loaded, would have been incapable
of handling the weight of such a dense commodity as cement.

Can anyone confirm this?

Thank you.

Bob Chaparro
Mission Viejo, Ca


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:
One of the statements on the Athearn website says that these hoppers
were "Designed to carry bulk commodities, such as grain, cement and
plastic."
It seems to me that this car, fully loaded, would have been incapable
of handling the weight of such a dense commodity as cement.
Can anyone confirm this?
You are right. It is confirmed in Kaminski's book on AC&F history, in which he describes the relation of cargo density to covered hopper volume.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


charles slater
 

We used to handle them when I was a switchman in LA, and they would only load the two end compartments and leave the center one empty.
We also had a custimer who recieved 3-bay hoppers of Ajax clenser and they would have the center compartment empty also, but because their unloading spot was up against a bumping post, they could only unload one end of the car and then we would need to take the car and turn it on the wye and re spot it so they could unload the other end of the car. Their unloading spot was made for two bay cars.
That could make for more operation on a model railroad.
Charlie Slater
Bakersfield, Ca.

From: Brian Paul Ehni <behni@comcast.net>
Reply-To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Athearn's New HO Three-Bay Covered Hoppers
Date: Sat, 03 Jun 2006 12:02:49 -0500

It would never be fully loaded with cement. Back in the day, hopper cars
used to have painted lines indicating the level of various commodities.

Cement, being more dense, would not literally fill the cubic space of the
car. Other commodities certainly could (and did).
--

Brian Ehni


From: Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@yahoo.com>
Reply-To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 03 Jun 2006 16:52:52 -0000
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Athearn's New HO Three-Bay Covered Hoppers

Just a few months ago Athearn released an HO-scale PS2 three-bay
covered hopper (Stock # 2893). The prototype for the model was the
covered hopper Pullman-Standard began producing beginning in the 1950s.

One of the statements on the Athearn website says that these hoppers
were "Designed to carry bulk commodities, such as grain, cement and
plastic."

It seems to me that this car, fully loaded, would have been incapable
of handling the weight of such a dense commodity as cement.

Can anyone confirm this?

Thank you.

Bob Chaparro
Mission Viejo, Ca


Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

Brian-

I'm aware of painted lines being used on open hoppers, but wouldn't
that be a problem with covered hoppers? It certainly would be an
interesting detail to model. Does anyone have iamges?

Bob Chaparro

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Brian Paul Ehni <behni@...> wrote:

It would never be fully loaded with cement. Back in the day,
hopper cars
used to have painted lines indicating the level of various
commodities.

Cement, being more dense, would not literally fill the cubic space
of the
car. Other commodities certainly could (and did).
--

Brian Ehni


From: Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
Reply-To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 03 Jun 2006 16:52:52 -0000
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Athearn's New HO Three-Bay Covered Hoppers

Just a few months ago Athearn released an HO-scale PS2 three-bay
covered hopper (Stock # 2893). The prototype for the model was
the
covered hopper Pullman-Standard began producing beginning in the
1950s.

One of the statements on the Athearn website says that these
hoppers
were "Designed to carry bulk commodities, such as grain, cement
and
plastic."

It seems to me that this car, fully loaded, would have been
incapable
of handling the weight of such a dense commodity as cement.

Can anyone confirm this?

Thank you.

Bob Chaparro
Mission Viejo, Ca


Ed Hawkins
 

On Saturday, June 3, 2006, at 09:52 AM, Bob Chaparro wrote:

One of the statements on the Athearn website says that these hoppers
were "Designed to carry bulk commodities, such as grain, cement and
plastic."

It seems to me that this car, fully loaded, would have been incapable
of handling the weight of such a dense commodity as cement.

Can anyone confirm this?
Bob,
In my articles in the September and November 2005 Railmodel Journal there are several photos of cars having a line on the exterior of the car and stencils stating that cement shall not be loaded higher than 3'-5" from the top of the hatch.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


tchenoweth@...
 

Bob,

I only saw 2 bay hoppers carrying cement, gravel and the like. I never
saw a 3 bay marked for cement and definitely never shot any. This was mainly
around the Santa Fe. Just my personal observation. Tom Chenoweth


Francis Pehowic <rdgbuff13@...>
 

The READING had larger 3500 cubic foot cars. Some of their loadings:

Lime Magnesite Cement Sand Roofing Granules Ground Coal Sugar Ilmenite
Limestone

Francis in Sunbury, Pa.

From: tchenoweth@aol.com
Reply-To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Athearn's New HO Three-Bay Covered Hoppers
Date: Sun, 4 Jun 2006 03:29:09 EDT

Bob,

I only saw 2 bay hoppers carrying cement, gravel and the like. I never
saw a 3 bay marked for cement and definitely never shot any. This was mainly
around the Santa Fe. Just my personal observation. Tom Chenoweth








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Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Francis Pehowic wrote:
The READING had larger 3500 cubic foot cars. Some of their loadings:
Lime Magnesite Cement Sand Roofing Granules Ground Coal Sugar Ilmenite Limestone
Were they 70-ton or 100-ton cars? Those are all dense cargoes.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Francis Pehowic <rdgbuff13@...>
 

Tony,
They were 100-ton cars. Taller than the Athearn car.

Francis in Sunbury, Pa.

From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@signaturepress.com>
Reply-To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Athearn's New HO Three-Bay Covered Hoppers
Date: Sun, 4 Jun 2006 11:59:51 -0700

Francis Pehowic wrote:
The READING had larger 3500 cubic foot cars. Some of their loadings:
Lime Magnesite Cement Sand Roofing Granules Ground Coal
Sugar Ilmenite Limestone
Were they 70-ton or 100-ton cars? Those are all dense cargoes.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history





Yahoo! Groups Links







mopacfirst
 

I might be posting this to the wrong list, given that the 3200 and
3500 cu.ft. cars might not have appeared by 1960, but I sure would
like to see one or more models of these cars. I really don't think I
could horizontally splice a shorter car and have it look decent.

Ron Merrick

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Francis Pehowic" <rdgbuff13@...> wrote:

Tony,
They were 100-ton cars. Taller than the Athearn car.

Francis in Sunbury, Pa.


From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
Reply-To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Athearn's New HO Three-Bay Covered Hoppers
Date: Sun, 4 Jun 2006 11:59:51 -0700

Francis Pehowic wrote:
The READING had larger 3500 cubic foot cars.


Tim O'Connor
 

Ron, the difference between the 3219cft and 2893cft is mostly
in the width of the car -- they are nearly the same overall
height (1" diff) and length. Also the pitch of the 2893 roof
is much steeper (6" vs about 1/2 that on the 3219).

This was discussed not long ago on the MFCL; Jim Kinkaid posted
drawings showing this to be true. (The drawings are still in the
MFCL PHOTOS area.) Given this fact, it's doubtful anyone will
do a 3219 and both Athearn and Walthers may end up putting 3219
paint schemes on their respective 2893's. I already lobbied John
Engstrom at Springfield 2006 to do the 3219 with the hat section
end post (instead of the channel). I'm not counting on it but it
would be great to have that version.

You are right the 3500 is not kitbashable from the 2893. And it
is on the MFCL "wish list" of 1960's freight cars. You have lots
of company!

Tim O'Connor

I might be posting this to the wrong list, given that the 3200 and
3500 cu.ft. cars might not have appeared by 1960, but I sure would
like to see one or more models of these cars.