Santa Fe USRA Rebuilt Reefers


Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

Based on the photographs in Santa fe Railway rolling stock reference series
volume 2, Refrigerators cars, It appears the USRA rebuild up to RR-34 kept
top operated couplers and RR-35 onward (postwar or nearly so) had bottom
operated couplers. I can't find this difference noted in the text so I am
looking for confirmation. Were any of the early top operated couplers
replaced with bottom operated couplers later on in life? I am working on
detailing an RR-28 and RR-23 for 1957. Thanks.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Sep 4, 2006, at 1:54 PM, Brian J Carlson wrote:

Based on the photographs in Santa fe Railway rolling stock reference series
volume 2, Refrigerators cars, It appears the USRA rebuild up to RR-34 kept
top operated couplers and RR-35 onward (postwar or nearly so) had bottom
operated couplers. I can't find this difference noted in the text so I am
looking for confirmation. Were any of the early top operated couplers
replaced with bottom operated couplers later on in life? I am working on
detailing an RR-28 and RR-23 for 1957. Thanks.
Brian, you are right that the postwar SFRD rebuilds had bottom-operated couplers with rotary uncoupling levers, whereas the prewar cars kept their original top operated couplers and uncoupling mechanisms. Beginning in 1953, however, the Santa Fe began a program of general repairs to upgrade the prewar cars, beginning with the Rr-19 class of 1936. Included in this program was the replacement of the ends of the underframes, elimination of the original USRA end sills and stub side sills, and application of new draft gear with bottom-operated Type E couplers and rotary uncoupling levers (though of a different type than those fitted to the Rr-36 and later classes when originally rebuilt). In addition, hatch covers were reversed, wood running boards replaced with steel, many cars got sliding plug doors, and all of the modernized cars were renumbered. Carrying out these modifications on Intermountain reefer kits would be lot of work, so I'm assuming you are modeling cars to which these "betterments" had not yet been applied.

By 1957, about a third of the Rr-23 class and about half of the Rr-28s still had original numbers (and thus had not yet been rebuilt). Even those cars would have had side sill reinforcements added below the doors, as are illustrated in several photos in the reefer book.

I hope this is helpful.

Richard Hendrickson


Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

Thanks Richard, I'll have to add the side sill reinforcement too. I
originally reread just the section on the rebuilt cars and not chapter 9 of
the book, which deals with the second rebuilding.

Did Sunshine do resin kits of the later rebuilds? I need to keep those
modifications in mind while determining the fleet I need for 1957.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Sep 4, 2006, at 7:22 PM, Brian J Carlson wrote:

Did Sunshine do resin kits of the later rebuilds? I need to keep those
modifications in mind while determining the fleet I need for 1957.
Not yet. but if Charlie Slater can be persuaded to make patterns for them, that might happen.

Richard Hendrickson


Ted Larson
 

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
wrote:
Even
those cars would have had side sill reinforcements added below the
doors, as are illustrated in several photos in the reefer book.
I hope this is helpful.
Richard Hendrickson
In researching the web, magazines, and books in preparation for doing a
plug door car, I noted variety in whether the side was reinforced, and
HOW it was reinforced. I also noticed variety in whether any black was
used on the door, and where on the door / mechanism it was used.
Regarding which train name was used on the plug door cars, the only
name that I found a photo of was The Super Chief.


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Sep 5, 2006, at 1:26 PM, mhrreast wrote:

In researching the web, magazines, and books in preparation for doing a
plug door car, I noted variety in whether the side was reinforced, and
HOW it was reinforced. I also noticed variety in whether any black was
used on the door, and where on the door / mechanism it was used.
Regarding which train name was used on the plug door cars, the only
name that I found a photo of was The Super Chief.
That's what happens when you have a only small sample to work from. All of the name train slogans were applied to USRA rebuilds after they got plug doors in the 1950s. The configuration of the side sill reinforcements depended on when they were applied. In many cases, side sill reinforcements were added to cars which still had leaf doors and the plug doors were added later; different style side sill reinforcements were used when they were installed at the same time as the sliding plug doors. All of this is covered in detail in the Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society reefer book, Rolling Stock Reference Series #2, which is currently available from the society's web site. I'm always a bit puzzled when modelers scramble around looking for bits and pieces of information on the web, in magazines, etc. when there's an entire book devoted to the subject which is readily available (and in this case isn't even very expensive).

Richard Hendrickson


Thomas M. Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

Hi Richard,

Then you get someone like a friend of mine who wants the book, but
refuses to purchase it because the reprint is a scan of the original.
Just as bad!

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@...

Richard Hendrickson wrote:

On Sep 5, 2006, at 1:26 PM, mhrreast wrote:



In researching the web, magazines, and books in preparation for doing a
plug door car, I noted variety in whether the side was reinforced, and
HOW it was reinforced. I also noticed variety in whether any black was
used on the door, and where on the door / mechanism it was used.
Regarding which train name was used on the plug door cars, the only
name that I found a photo of was The Super Chief.

That's what happens when you have a only small sample to work from.
All of the name train slogans were applied to USRA rebuilds after they
got plug doors in the 1950s. The configuration of the side sill
reinforcements depended on when they were applied. In many cases, side
sill reinforcements were added to cars which still had leaf doors and
the plug doors were added later; different style side sill
reinforcements were used when they were installed at the same time as
the sliding plug doors. All of this is covered in detail in the Santa
Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society reefer book, Rolling Stock
Reference Series #2, which is currently available from the society's
web site. I'm always a bit puzzled when modelers scramble around
looking for bits and pieces of information on the web, in magazines,
etc. when there's an entire book devoted to the subject which is
readily available (and in this case isn't even very expensive).

Richard Hendrickson




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Ted Larson
 

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
wrote:
All of this is covered in detail in the Santa
Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society reefer book, Rolling Stock
Reference Series #2, which is currently available from the society's
web site.
Ya got me mystified on this one. I'm quite sure that is one of the
references that I used. I'll look at it in more detail, see what I
missed. Thanks for the heads-up.

Ted