Athearn metal kits


ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., Tony Thompson <thompsonmarytony@...>
wrote: 'My favorite "old" kit story is about the Athearn metal box
car--which I found to be hell to assemble as a teenager, back when the
kits were new. Decades later, I thought, "Now I have the skills to do
that kit easily and well," but upon trying one, found that it was STILL
hell to assemble.'

It wasn't you Tony.

Ed


Russ Strodtz <sheridan@...>
 

IIRC there was a little white metal piece that went on the inside of the
floor that had screw holes in it. Think that was what held the trucks on.
Could never figure out how to position it correctly so it would line up.

Rather frustrating,

Russ

----- Original Message -----
From: ed_mines
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, 07 February, 2007 11:49
Subject: [STMFC] Athearn metal kits


--- In STMFC@..., Tony Thompson <thompsonmarytony@...>
wrote: 'My favorite "old" kit story is about the Athearn metal box
car--which I found to be hell to assemble as a teenager, back when the
kits were new. Decades later, I thought, "Now I have the skills to do
that kit easily and well," but upon trying one, found that it was STILL
hell to assemble.'

It wasn't you Tony.

Ed


armprem
 

When I first started in the hobby I built a few Varney paper sided kits.I then built a few Mantua metal kits with paper sides.The trucks for both were horrible.I enjoyed building M. Dale Newton's Red Ball models.Later I discovered the Central Valley line of kits.They were great even to the humor included in the instructions.I had a rather large number of the early Athearn metal cars.The "upgraded" kits were difficult to build because some of the stampings were poorly executed and did not fit well.Siver Streak and Ulrich provided variety.I even built a few Lanconia kits.My favorite magazine was HO Monthly. Like many, I was greatly influenced by the great and immortal John Allen.My earlier layouts were all freelance.It was only much later when more prototypical models become available did I switch to a specific prototype.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 12:49 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Athearn metal kits


> --- In STMFC@..., Tony Thompson <thompsonmarytony@...>
> wrote: 'My favorite "old" kit story is about the Athearn metal box
> car--which I found to be hell to assemble as a teenager, back when the
> kits were new. Decades later, I thought, "Now I have the skills to do
> that kit easily and well," but upon trying one, found that it was STILL
> hell to assemble.'
>
> It wasn't you Tony.
>
> Ed
>
>
>
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> Version: 7.5.432 / Virus Database: 268.17.28/672 - Release Date: 2/6/2007 10:22 AM
>
>


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


armprem
 

Sorry,that's Laconia.

----- Original Message -----
From: "A. Premo" <armprem@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 1:57 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Athearn metal kits


> When I first started in the hobby I built a few Varney paper sided kits.I
> then built a few Mantua metal kits with paper sides.The trucks for both were
> horrible.I enjoyed building M. Dale Newton's Red Ball models.Later I
> discovered the Central Valley line of kits.They were great even to the humor
> included in the instructions.I had a rather large number of the early
> Athearn metal cars.The "upgraded" kits were difficult to build because some
> of the stampings were poorly executed and did not fit well.Siver Streak and
> Ulrich provided variety.I even built a few Lanconia kits.My favorite
> magazine was HO Monthly. Like many, I was greatly influenced by the great
> and immortal John Allen.My earlier layouts were all freelance.It was only
> much later when more prototypical models become available did I switch to a
> specific prototype.Armand Premo
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...>
> To: <STMFC@...>
> Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 12:49 PM
> Subject: [STMFC] Athearn metal kits
>
>
> > --- In STMFC@..., Tony Thompson <thompsonmarytony@...>
> > wrote: 'My favorite "old" kit story is about the Athearn metal box
> > car--which I found to be hell to assemble as a teenager, back when the
> > kits were new. Decades later, I thought, "Now I have the skills to do
> > that kit easily and well," but upon trying one, found that it was STILL
> > hell to assemble.'
> >
> > It wasn't you Tony.
> >
> > Ed
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Yahoo! Groups Links
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > No virus found in this incoming message.
> > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> > Version: 7.5.432 / Virus Database: 268.17.28/672 - Release Date:
> 2/6/2007 10:22 AM
> >
> >
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
>
>
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> Version: 7.5.432 / Virus Database: 268.17.28/672 - Release Date: 2/6/2007 10:22 AM
>
>


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Tony comments that these kits are still "hell to assemble".

Well, he has that exactly right. Other problems, besides attempting to get all of the stamped steel and cast metal parts aligned correctly (bleeding fingers), include rampant zincpest, and most frustrating, no model paints whatsoever on the current market that will satisfactorily match the Stewart-Lundahl 410M finishing products that Athearn (and among others- Ulrich) used at that time.

The two common things about these cars (boxcars) that seem on casual look to readily turn off current modelers are 1) The thick metal running boards seemingly made of 4x6's, and 2) (except on the PRR, SAL, and DT&I cars with rolled roofs) the peculiar very prominent stepped joint between the roof and the sides. For those cars that I like to operate regularly, I simply replace the running boards with Tichy, Details West, or in one case, Kadee products (made relatively easy because in most cases the cast metal running boards are already failing!). This simple improvement alone is often enough for the casual modeler/visitor to completely overlook all the other dated features about these oft-very-handsome and substantial cars.

I know at least one of the Athearn steel cars that Ben Hom sneaks once in awhile into his prototype meet displays, and to my knowledge very few people pick up what it is. I did once, because by serendipity I also had the identical car- which currently also runs incognito amongst a string of far newer and more sophisticated models.

Denny
--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento