NKP 22100 DD 40' boxcar from NKPHS


Bill McCoy
 

Several years ago I bought from the NKP Historical Society a specially
painted McKean Range DD 40' boxcar with a diagonal panel roof and 4-4
ends. Before I spend a lot of time making up for the underframe and
other parts shortcomings to get the car up to contemporary standards I
thought I would see if any one in the group can comment on how accurate
this model is. The car number is NKP 22101 and has a 12' door opening.
The car has 3-5 panel riveted sides and fishbelly side sills. Built
date which I expect the society researched is 10-29 and weigh data
shows AX 10-52.

Thanks,

Bill McCoy
Jax


Dean Payne <deanpayne@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Bill McCoy" <wpmccoy@...> wrote:

Several years ago I bought from the NKP Historical Society a
specially
painted McKean Range DD 40' boxcar with a diagonal panel roof and 4-
4 ends. Before I spend a lot of time making up for the underframe and
other parts shortcomings to get the car up to contemporary
standards I thought I would see if any one in the group can comment
on how accurate this model is. The car number is NKP 22101 and has a
12' door opening.
The car has 3-5 panel riveted sides and fishbelly side sills. Built
date which I expect the society researched is 10-29 and weigh data
shows AX 10-52.

Thanks,

Bill McCoy
Jax
I am gratified to be (finally) answering a question instead of asking
one! The Summer 2005 Nickel Plate Technical and Historical Society
Magazine has an article about these cars, with photos and NKP
diagrams. Backissues are probably available from the NKPHTS.
http://nkphts.org/store/
Unfortunately, these cars aren't as prototypical as I would wish.
The paint is accurate, I bet, but there are limitations in the McKean
kit used. After looking at the article, I considered stripping mine,
replacing all the details, etc, but then I'd be scrapping a limited-
release car! Even still, the Dreadnaught ends of the protoype had
thick, flattened ribs where the (3) panels were riveted together. I
have no idea how to model those.
What I've decided to do is to keep the kit as-built, but the diagonal
panel roof really bothers me. The prototype had a Murphy roof, and
the kit has a very thick plastic roofwalk that represents a metal
walk. Neither will do on my 1937 layout! However, I am betting that
a Red Caboose roof (Walthers part #629-800001) will improve things
greatly, and since the roof is a press fit, it wont be permanent and
hurt the collector's value of the car. I believe that Pollyscale
Special Oxide Red is pretty close to a match for color.
I have the twin set (with sister 3710), which were my first kits with
non molded-on details. I remember that I was told to buy offset-
shank Kadees, as the car rides too high for standard couplers.
Besides the roof, the brake hardware on the end is crude, but I'll
live with that. (Worse for me is the anachronistic paint/lettering
scheme, but I'd start with an undec if I wanted to go whole hog as-
built, and buy the early "N.Y.C.&St.L." decals from Westerfield.) At
the time these kits came out, they were pretty good, but the grabs
and ladders are a bit thick by today's standards. You could replace
those, of course, but I find them acceptable enough, considering.
The roof, though, has to go! Luckily for me, replacing it is easy
(and reversible).
There were 350 of the 22000-series built in 1929, and 279 remained in
April 1960 (appearing in six different numbering series over their
careers!). There were also 150 end-door cars, a photo of which
appeared in a later NKPHTS Magazine.
Dean Payne


Dean Payne <deanpayne@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Dean Payne" <deanpayne@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., "Bill McCoy" <wpmccoy@> wrote:

Several years ago I bought from the NKP Historical Society a
specially
painted McKean Range DD 40' boxcar with a diagonal panel roof and
4-4 ends. Before I spend a lot of time making up for the underframe
and other parts shortcomings to get the car up to contemporary
standards I thought I would see if any one in the group can comment
on how accurate this model is. The car number is NKP 22101 and has
a 12' door opening.
The car has 3-5 panel riveted sides and fishbelly side sills.
Built date which I expect the society researched is 10-29 and weigh
data shows AX 10-52.

Thanks,

Bill McCoy
Jax
I am gratified to be (finally) answering a question instead of
asking
one! The Summer 2005 Nickel Plate Technical and Historical Society
Magazine has an article about these cars, with photos and NKP
diagrams. Backissues are probably available from the NKPHTS.
http://nkphts.org/store/
Unfortunately, these cars aren't as prototypical as I would wish.
The paint is accurate, I bet, but there are limitations in the
McKean kit used. After looking at the article, I considered
stripping mine,
replacing all the details, etc, but then I'd be scrapping a limited-
release car! Even still, the Dreadnaught ends of the protoype had
thick, flattened ribs where the (3) panels were riveted together.
I have no idea how to model those.
What I've decided to do is to keep the kit as-built, but the
diagonal panel roof really bothers me. The prototype had a Murphy
roof, andthe kit has a very thick plastic roofwalk that represents a
metal walk. Neither will do on my 1937 layout! However, I am
betting that a Red Caboose roof (Walthers part #629-800001) will
improve things greatly, and since the roof is a press fit, it wont be
permanent and
hurt the collector's value of the car. I believe that Pollyscale
Special Oxide Red is pretty close to a match for color.
I have the twin set (with sister 3710), which were my first kits
with
non molded-on details. I remember that I was told to buy offset-
shank Kadees, as the car rides too high for standard couplers.
Besides the roof, the brake hardware on the end is crude, but I'll
live with that. (Worse for me is the anachronistic paint/lettering
scheme, but I'd start with an undec if I wanted to go whole hog as-
built, and buy the early "N.Y.C.&St.L." decals from Westerfield.)
At the time these kits came out, they were pretty good, but the grabs
and ladders are a bit thick by today's standards. You could
replace those, of course, but I find them acceptable enough,
considering. The roof, though, has to go! Luckily for me, replacing
it is easy (and reversible).
There were 350 of the 22000-series built in 1929, and 279 remained
in April 1960 (appearing in six different numbering series over their
careers!). There were also 150 end-door cars, a photo of which
appeared in a later NKPHTS Magazine.
Dean Payne
Further reading of the article (and photo captions) reveals the
following:
By 1959, the roofwalks would have been steel on some (all?) cars.
(But PLEASE replace the supplied walks with something more
accurate!) The "fishbelly side sills" should be much shorter door
gussets, extending just past the ends of the doors. The original
gussets had vertical ends, these were replaced with diagonal-end
gussets, as seen in a 1950 photo.
The doors aren't quite perfect either, but they give the proper
feel. If you are really reworking this car, you might want to try
to file down the bolsters to bring the body height down to 14' 7.5"
over the rails; with the thick running board and all, it appears to
be closer to 15' 9". It appears to ride high, I'm not sure you could
easily file down the bolsters enough to use a standard coupler. The
side ladders should be 8 rung, the end ladders aren't quite perfect
either.
Geez, it sounds like I'm slammin' this car! For my own use, I'll
keep most of what I now recognize as "inaccuracies". I have other
projects to do, and in order for me to do it "right" for my era I'd
have to strip the car! But, if you're concerned about the
underframe, these other parts are more visible; make your own
decision on what to upgrade. It is possible to replace at least some
of these parts and retain the original paint/lettering. Weathering
could hide any paint mismatches on the roof, I don't know what you'd
do if you want to replace the doors (I don't know when they stopped
painting them black, there is a photo of a car with not too long
after its second repaint, in January 1950.) If you're going to
replace anything on this car, the roof is the most visible (unless
your layout is very high), most egregious, and most easily replaced.
This is only my opinion, of course, Your Mileage May Vary.
Buffalo Creek Graphics produced this car in O scale, BTW, with the
original lettering and black doors. A later paint scheme was also
offered, both appear to be sold out:
http://www.trainresource.com/O_Scale_Freight.html#XM
Dean Payne


Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

The car is a stand in at best. The prototype cars had Murphy roofs, and
dreadnaught ends are best described as 2.5-3-2.5 ends since as Dean mentions
the panels seem is in the middle of a wide rib. 22000-22249 have Peacock
Handbrakes, and 22250-22349 have Ureco hand brakes. Various cars in the
series were renumbered over the years for Autoparts service. The side
panel and door opening count are correct.
Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bill McCoy" <wpmccoy@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 4:34 PM
Subject: [STMFC] NKP 22100 DD 40' boxcar from NKPHS


Several years ago I bought from the NKP Historical Society a specially
painted McKean Range DD 40' boxcar with a diagonal panel roof and 4-4
ends. Before I spend a lot of time making up for the underframe and
other parts shortcomings to get the car up to contemporary standards I
thought I would see if any one in the group can comment on how accurate
this model is. The car number is NKP 22101 and has a 12' door opening.
The car has 3-5 panel riveted sides and fishbelly side sills. Built
date which I expect the society researched is 10-29 and weigh data
shows AX 10-52.

Thanks,

Bill McCoy
Jax




Yahoo! Groups Links




Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

Dean wrote: The Summer 2005 Nickel Plate Technical and Historical Society
Magazine has an article about these cars, with photos and NKP
diagrams. Backissues are probably available from the NKPHTS.
http://nkphts.org/store/
I have about 75 issues available in the store if anyone wants them. Ordering
procedures are on the website or drop me an email off list
Brian J Carlson P.E.
NKPHTS Special Projects Director


Bill McCoy
 

Thanks Dean and Brian. This looks like more of a project than I want
to get into considering the number of unbuilt cars in the kit bunker.
I like the NKP but it isn't a core railroad for me and I have other
NKP representative cars so this one will go on the block for $10.00
plus postage. Thanks.

If any one is interested pleas contact me off line at
wpmccoy@...

Bill McCoy
Jax, FL

--- In STMFC@..., "Brian J Carlson" <brian@...> wrote:

The car is a stand in at best. The prototype cars had Murphy roofs,
and
dreadnaught ends are best described as 2.5-3-2.5 ends since as Dean
mentions
the panels seem is in the middle of a wide rib. 22000-22249 have
Peacock
Handbrakes, and 22250-22349 have Ureco hand brakes. Various cars in
the
series were renumbered over the years for Autoparts service. The
side
panel and door opening count are correct.
Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bill McCoy" <wpmccoy@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 4:34 PM
Subject: [STMFC] NKP 22100 DD 40' boxcar from NKPHS


Several years ago I bought from the NKP Historical Society a
specially
painted McKean Range DD 40' boxcar with a diagonal panel roof and
4-4
ends. Before I spend a lot of time making up for the underframe
and
other parts shortcomings to get the car up to contemporary
standards I
thought I would see if any one in the group can comment on how
accurate
this model is. The car number is NKP 22101 and has a 12' door
opening.
The car has 3-5 panel riveted sides and fishbelly side sills.
Built
date which I expect the society researched is 10-29 and weigh data
shows AX 10-52.

Thanks,

Bill McCoy
Jax




Yahoo! Groups Links




Dean Payne <deanpayne@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Dean Payne" <deanpayne@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., "Bill McCoy" <wpmccoy@> wrote:

Several years ago I bought from the NKP Historical Society a
specially
painted McKean Range DD 40' boxcar with a diagonal panel roof and
4-4 ends. Before I spend a lot of time making up for the underframe
and> > other parts shortcomings to get the car up to contemporary
standards I thought I would see if any one in the group can comment
on how accurate this model is. The car number is NKP 22101 and has
a > 12' door opening.
The car has 3-5 panel riveted sides and fishbelly side sills.
Built > > date which I expect the society researched is 10-29 and
weigh data > > shows AX 10-52.

Thanks,

Bill McCoy
Jax
I am gratified to be (finally) answering a question instead of
asking
one! The Summer 2005 Nickel Plate Technical and Historical Society
Magazine has an article about these cars, with photos and NKP
diagrams. Backissues are probably available from the NKPHTS.
http://nkphts.org/store/
Unfortunately, these cars aren't as prototypical as I would wish.
The paint is accurate, I bet, but there are limitations in the
McKean > kit used. After looking at the article, I considered
stripping mine,
replacing all the details, etc, but then I'd be scrapping a limited-
release car! Even still, the Dreadnaught ends of the protoype had
thick, flattened ribs where the (3) panels were riveted together.
I have no idea how to model those.
What I've decided to do is to keep the kit as-built, but the
diagonal panel roof really bothers me. The prototype had a Murphy
roof, and
the kit has a very thick plastic roofwalk that represents a metal
walk. Neither will do on my 1937 layout! However, I am betting
that
a Red Caboose roof (Walthers part #629-800001) will improve things
greatly, and since the roof is a press fit, it wont be permanent
and
hurt the collector's value of the car. I believe that Pollyscale
Special Oxide Red is pretty close to a match for color.
< SNIP >
Dean Payne
Oops! I got the color recommendation wrong! I remembered that the
PRR gon that looks "close" I had painted with a combo of Special
Oxide Red and Zinc Chromate Primer, and I'm pretty sure that Zinc
Chromate was the major component! I'd recommend 75% Zinc Chromate
and 25% Specail Oxide as a starting point for the NKP car, maybe even
90/10. I'll post my results when I get my roofs in. Sorry for
leading anybody astray!
Dean Payne