Freight Cars in Manitowoc Wisconsin on CNW


Douglas Harding
 

Last I knew, the entire state of Wisconsin was east of the Mississippi
River. The river actually forms the border between Wisconson on the
east and Iowa and Minnesota on the west. So it would appear neither car
is inviolation. Even if they contained Southern Illinois coal, they
still did not get west of the Mississippi.

Doug Harding


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 11, 2007, at 12:31 PM, Doug Harding wrote:

Last I knew, the entire state of Wisconsin was east of the Mississippi
River. The river actually forms the border between Wisconson on the
east and Iowa and Minnesota on the west. So it would appear neither car
is inviolation. Even if they contained Southern Illinois coal, they
still did not get west of the Mississippi.
In short, our list CEO is a great list leader but a lousy geographer.

Richard Hendrickson


Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Richard Hendrickson notes:

"In short, our list CEO is a great list leader but a lousy geographer."

Well...I dunno about being a great list leader but I just took a look and...regretfully...even the mouth of the Mississippi [ my fallback ] looks to be west of Manitowoc. Too bad. OTOH, I've never claimed Colorado is in the East <G>...and, with that, we return to frt cars.

Mike Brock


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 11, 2007, at 6:55 PM, Mike Brock wrote:

Richard Hendrickson notes:

"In short, our list CEO is a great list leader but a lousy geographer."

Well...I dunno about being a great list leader but I just took a look
and...regretfully...even the mouth of the Mississippi [ my fallback ] looks
to be west of Manitowoc. Too bad. OTOH, I've never claimed Colorado is in
the East <G>...and, with that, we return to frt cars.
Now, Mike, I never said that Colorado was in the east. What I said was that, from my perspective as a lifelong resident of the Pacific Coast states, the east begins at the Front Range, and by that reckoning only EASTERN Colorado is in the east; more than half of Colorado is in the west. Eastern Colorado is, both geographically and culturally, actually Western Kansas. To bring this back to freight cars (sort of), railroads like the Rio Grande and (of course) the Union Pacific were western, while railroads like the Rock Island and Missouri Pacific clearly were not. Nor were the Burlington and Chicago & Northwestern, as their lines in Colorado, Wyoming and Montana were all east of the Rockies.

Richard Hendrickson


cj riley <cjriley42@...>
 

At the risk of perpetuating an off list topic: when stream flow was originally
measured at the junction at Cairo IL, the upper US was in flood so the heaviest
flow was down what is now the Mississippi. By standard practice therefore, the
Mississippi was determined to come from the north. In reality, the normal
heavier flow is from the Ohio, so technically, the head of the Allegheny in
western New York (or perhaps the Monongahela in WVA) is the actual beginning of
the Mississippi and what comes from Wisconsin is some other river.

Maybe that's what Fearless Leader was thinking about.

CJ Riley

--- Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Feb 11, 2007, at 6:55 PM, Mike Brock wrote:

Richard Hendrickson notes:

"In short, our list CEO is a great list leader but a lousy geographer."

Well...I dunno about being a great list leader but I just took a look
and...regretfully...even the mouth of the Mississippi [ my fallback ]
looks
to be west of Manitowoc. Too bad. OTOH, I've never claimed Colorado is
in
the East <G>...and, with that, we return to frt cars.



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Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

CJ Riley notes:

"By standard practice therefore, the
Mississippi was determined to come from the north. In reality, the normal
heavier flow is from the Ohio, so technically, the head of the Allegheny in
western New York (or perhaps the Monongahela in WVA) is the actual beginning of
the Mississippi and what comes from Wisconsin is some other river."

Precisely. Well...probably not. In fact, the "Fearless Leader" wasn't thinking at all and violated his normal practice of double checking matters that are not absolutely clear to everyone [ like...UP frt cars were better than those of others ]. Incidentally, to hopefully end this examination of rivers, east of Cairo, IL [ located in the Midwest ], the Tennessee River flows into the Mississippi...ooops...The Ohio. Back in the 60's during a particularly bad flood situation on the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, TVA turned the Tennessee "off". The large number of dams on the Tennessee allowed this to happen for awhile. TVA was formed originally to control the continual flooding of the Tennessee. BTW, while the TVA did, indeed, improve flooding matters a great deal and provided enormous electrical power to the region [ hence, Oak Ridge and Alcoa, both huge users of electrical power ], it did not completely end such flooding...as I noted on more than one occasion. And, now, this terminates the subject of rivers.

Mike Brock


ljack70117@...
 

Have you forgotten the Missouri At St Louis?
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left

On Feb 12, 2007, at 12:37 PM, Mike Brock wrote:

CJ Riley notes:

"By standard practice therefore, the
Mississippi was determined to come from the north. In reality, the normal
heavier flow is from the Ohio, so technically, the head of the Allegheny in
western New York (or perhaps the Monongahela in WVA) is the actual beginning
of
the Mississippi and what comes from Wisconsin is some other river."

Precisely. Well...probably not. In fact, the "Fearless Leader" wasn't
thinking at all and violated his normal practice of double checking matters
that are not absolutely clear to everyone [ like...UP frt cars were better
than those of others ]. Incidentally, to hopefully end this examination of
rivers, east of Cairo, IL [ located in the Midwest ], the Tennessee River
flows into the Mississippi...ooops...The Ohio. Back in the 60's during a
particularly bad flood situation on the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, TVA
turned the Tennessee "off". The large number of dams on the Tennessee
allowed this to happen for awhile. TVA was formed originally to control the
continual flooding of the Tennessee. BTW, while the TVA did, indeed, improve
flooding matters a great deal and provided enormous electrical power to the
region [ hence, Oak Ridge and Alcoa, both huge users of electrical power ],
it did not completely end such flooding...as I noted on more than one
occasion. And, now, this terminates the subject of rivers.

Mike Brock




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Russ Strodtz <sheridan@...>
 

It still says on the front page of the "Fort Worth Star-Telegram",
"Where The West Begins". That was Amon Carter's idea. Think he was
probably right.

Russ

----- Original Message -----
From: Richard Hendrickson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, 11 February, 2007 21:43
Subject: Re: [STMFC] RE: Freight Cars in Manitowoc Wisconsin on CNW


On Feb 11, 2007, at 6:55 PM, Mike Brock wrote:

> Richard Hendrickson notes:
>
> "In short, our list CEO is a great list leader but a lousy geographer."
>
> Well...I dunno about being a great list leader but I just took a look
> and...regretfully...even the mouth of the Mississippi [ my fallback ]
> looks
> to be west of Manitowoc. Too bad. OTOH, I've never claimed Colorado is
> in
> the East <G>...and, with that, we return to frt cars.

Now, Mike, I never said that Colorado was in the east. What I said was
that, from my perspective as a lifelong resident of the Pacific Coast
states, the east begins at the Front Range, and by that reckoning only
EASTERN Colorado is in the east; more than half of Colorado is in the
west. Eastern Colorado is, both geographically and culturally,
actually Western Kansas. To bring this back to freight cars (sort of),
railroads like the Rio Grande and (of course) the Union Pacific were
western, while railroads like the Rock Island and Missouri Pacific
clearly were not. Nor were the Burlington and Chicago & Northwestern,
as their lines in Colorado, Wyoming and Montana were all east of the
Rockies.

Richard Hendrickson




Yahoo! Groups Links


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Russ Strodtz wrote:
It still says on the front page of the "Fort Worth Star-Telegram", "Where The West Begins". That was Amon Carter's idea. Think he was probably right.
It's all relative, Russ. A couple of generations earlier, that was Pittsburgh's slogan.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history