C&NW's Wood Street Terminal/ The Potato Yard


Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

While reviewing the June 2002 issue of RAILMODEL JOURNAL I came
across a 1920s photo of C&NW's Wood Street Terminal in Chicago. This
facility also was known as "The Potato Yard".

The image shows scores of reefers and an ice deck. There is no
storage terminal building visible. Instead, the tracks for unloading
reefers are in pairs with space between each pair of tracks for
trucks to be loaded directly from the cars.

Fortunately, you won't have to look for the magazine as one can
locate the same image on the C&NW Historical Society's website. The
images can be seen at:

http://www.cnwhs.org/memberphotos/displayimage.php?
album=search&cat=0&pos=0

or

http://tinyurl.com/32vlnk

Bob Chaparro
Moderator
Citrus Industry Modeling Group
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/citrusmodeling/


Jack Mullen
 

Unfortunately, referencing a specific photo in the CNWHS archives is
difficult. Bob's link won't get you there.

best I can offer is a link to the photo archive:
http://www.cnwhs.org/memberphotos/search.php
then enter the search string "Wood Street" in the box, and the search
will get you to the photo in question.

As Bob says, there is no storage building. Potatoes went direct from
reefer to truck, thus the concrete driveways between pairs of tracks.
The admin building at left in the photo provided office space for
vegetable brokers as well as railroad clerks. There are truck scales
and scalehouse in the driveway in front of the office bldg.

As far as I know there was no ice platform at the Spud Yard. After
all, it was a terminal for inbound perishables. I think what's
visible in the photo is a covered unloading platform.

Jack Mullen



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Chaparro" <thecitrusbelt@...>
wrote:

While reviewing the June 2002 issue of RAILMODEL JOURNAL I came
across a 1920s photo of C&NW's Wood Street Terminal in Chicago. This
facility also was known as "The Potato Yard".

The image shows scores of reefers and an ice deck. There is no
storage terminal building visible. Instead, the tracks for unloading
reefers are in pairs with space between each pair of tracks for
trucks to be loaded directly from the cars.

Fortunately, you won't have to look for the magazine as one can
locate the same image on the C&NW Historical Society's website. The
images can be seen at:

http://www.cnwhs.org/memberphotos/displayimage.php?
album=search&cat=0&pos=0

or

http://tinyurl.com/32vlnk

Bob Chaparro
Moderator
Citrus Industry Modeling Group
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/citrusmodeling/


Tim O'Connor
 

direct link:
http://www.cnwhs.org/memberphotos/albums/userpics/10101/Wood-Street-Chgo.jpg

looks to me like some judicious airbrushing has 'cleaned up' the
place a bit

Tim O'Connor

At 3/21/2007 12:05 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
While reviewing the June 2002 issue of RAILMODEL JOURNAL I came
across a 1920s photo of C&NW's Wood Street Terminal in Chicago. This
facility also was known as "The Potato Yard".

The image shows scores of reefers and an ice deck. There is no
storage terminal building visible. Instead, the tracks for unloading
reefers are in pairs with space between each pair of tracks for
trucks to be loaded directly from the cars.

Fortunately, you won't have to look for the magazine as one can
locate the same image on the C&NW Historical Society's website.


Russ Strodtz <sheridan@...>
 

Tim,

Wood Street also handled Onions. From the number of
open hatches this may be the Onion end of the layout
or a shot during the small Spring or Fall periods
when potatoes could be handled with ventilation only.

The freight yard to the left belong to the C&NW.
Beyond and to the left of it was the B&OCT Lincoln
Street Coach Yard and the Robey Street Roundhouse.

To the right of this photo, (Which is facing East
towards downtown), there were at least six or seven
more pairs of tracks which would have gradually gotten
longer. Between the South border of the Wood Street
terminal and the CB&Q main was the CB&Q Western Ave
roundhouse where all passenger power was serviced.

Off in the smoke in the distance would have been the
C&NW Morgan Street unloading area for produce in general.
At that point the C&NW and CB&Q were side by side on
the same elevation above the streets. The CB&Q had a
small produce unloading area at Racine Ave. almost
directly across from Morgan Street.

Moving further East the C&NW mains lined up directly
with the St Charles Airline. The CB&Q connected with the
Airline via crossovers at the Union Avenue interlocking.

While the C&NW and CB&Q shared the same elevation the
B&OCT was about a block North on it's own. The SOO and
CGW also used the B&OCT trackage. The two double track
bridges over the Chicago river were side by side.

Russ

----- Original Message -----
From: Tim O'Connor
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, 21 March, 2007 21:37
Subject: Re: [STMFC] C&NW's Wood Street Terminal/ The Potato
Yard



direct link:
http://www.cnwhs.org/memberphotos/albums/userpics/10101/Wood-Street-Chgo.jpg

looks to me like some judicious airbrushing has 'cleaned up' the
place a bit

Tim O'Connor


Charlie Vlk
 

I don't think there is a "ice deck" in the photo. The structure in the far right side of the yard looks like a covered loading dock,
not an icing platform or stage.
Loads did not originate out of Wood Street (for the most part) although in the C&NW film I seem to recall
a demonstration of a loaded car having shaved ice blown into it from a truck mounted rig. Any loads sent
out of Woods Street were most likely shipments to local wholesalers (Peoria, Joliet, etc.?) from brokers
who reloaded the cars here...so truck or wagon based icing may have sufficed for that business.
Charlie Vlk