Pennsy, Arrogance . . .


SUVCWORR@...
 

In a message dated 3/25/2007 4:24:40 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
thompson@... writes:

Tell us again, Greg, which railroad it was which styled itself
the "Standard Railroad of the World."



While the PRR did call itself the "Standard Railroad of the World" this is
an implied misconception of the origin of the moniker. The "Standard" did
refer to a standard for other RR's to follow but referenced the standardization
of various parts used mainly in locomotives, and infrastructure and to a
lessor extent freight cars. The use of the same mechanical parts on multiple
classes of locomotives -- K4 and L1, H8, 9 and 10 as examples, resulting in
less variety of inventory at repair facilities. The use of the same parts in
30,000+ X29 boxcars, 40,000+ H21 and H25 hoppers, another 30,000+ GLA, GLC and
GLCa hoppers using interchangeable parts. Standardization of stations with
the exception of major urban areas etc. This is not to say that other roads
did not standardize to certain levels. Just that the PRR took the moniker and
used it as a marketing tool. The fact that it was perceived to mean
something other than its original intent is testament to the effective use of the
term as a marketing ploy.

Rich Orr



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Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Greg Martin wrote:
I do believe that there might be some perception that we PRR guys are arrogant (modelers as well as the RR's management), but if you sit in our chairs we see it as being defensive, not arrogant.
Tell us again, Greg, which railroad it was which styled itself the "Standard Railroad of the World."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Rich Orr wrote:
While the PRR did call itself the "Standard Railroad of the World" this is
an implied misconception of the origin of the moniker. The "Standard" did
refer to a standard for other RR's to follow but referenced the standardization
of various parts used mainly in locomotives, and infrastructure and to a
lessor extent freight cars . . . This is not to say that other roads
did not standardize to certain levels.
During the Harriman era, Railway Age editorialized that the Harriman roads had carried standardarization further than, as they put it with tongue in cheek, "certain well publicized eastern roads." I think that sounds like more than ". . . certain levels."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Mar 25, 2007, at 2:26 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

Rich Orr wrote:
> While the PRR did call itself the "Standard Railroad of the World"
> this is
> an implied misconception of the origin of the moniker. The
> "Standard" did
> refer to a standard for other RR's to follow but referenced the
> standardization
> of various parts used mainly in locomotives, and infrastructure and
> to a
> lessor extent freight cars . . . This is not to say that other roads
> did not standardize to certain levels.

During the Harriman era, Railway Age editorialized that the
Harriman roads had carried standardarization further than, as they put
it with tongue in cheek, "certain well publicized eastern roads." I
think that sounds like more than ". . . certain levels."
I will add that, when John Purcell became the Santa Fe's chief
mechanical officer in 1912, he immediately began a systematic
standardization and parts inventory program which became known in the
company as the "Santa Fe Method." The most obvious examples were the
many standardized parts and appliances used on the 3400 class 4-6-2s,
3160 class 2-8-2s, 3700 class 4-8-2s, and 3800 class 2-10-2s, but the
system extended to many other mechanical department functions,
including freight car trucks and other components. It was so widely
regarded in industry circles that mechanical officers of other
railroads (including some European railroads) visited the Santa Fe to
see the "Santa Fe Method" at first hand. So the Pennsy's vaunted
standardization certainly wasn't either novel or unique, though (as
with other aspects of railroad operations) they did it on a larger
scale than anyone else.

Richard Hendrickson


Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: SUVCWORR@...

thompson@... writes:

Tell us again, Greg, which railroad it was which styled itself
the "Standard Railroad of the World."

While the PRR did call itself the "Standard Railroad of the World" this is
an implied misconception of the origin of the moniker. The "Standard" did
refer to a standard for other RR's to follow but referenced the standardization
of various parts used mainly in locomotives, and infrastructure and to a
lessor extent freight cars.
----- Original Message -----

Again, my impression from what I've read - not researched - was that this moniker had more to do with foreign governments believing that because the PRR was the biggest, it must also be the best and seeking out technical and management help from the PRR to develop and improve their own systems. Thus, elsewhere in the world, the PRR was held up as the standard that a modern railroad should seek to follow, in other words, "The Standard Railroad of the World".

KL


prr6380
 

I don't believe that "Standard Railroad of the World" was really
refering to anything to do with equipment standards. Instead, it
was a marketing phrase intended to say that the PRR was setting
the "Standard" as to how to run a railroad. They were proud of it
successes.

Marketing people years later came up with "America's Team" to call
the Dallas Cowboys. As a Steeler fan I though it to be arroganat,
but I got over it. Some railfans seem to not be able to. The PRR
and the Cowboys eventually fell on hard times.

Walt Stafa


-- In STMFC@..., "Kurt Laughlin" <fleeta@...> wrote:


----- Original Message -----
From: SUVCWORR@...

thompson@... writes:

Tell us again, Greg, which railroad it was which styled itself
the "Standard Railroad of the World."

While the PRR did call itself the "Standard Railroad of the World"
this is
an implied misconception of the origin of the moniker.
The "Standard" did
refer to a standard for other RR's to follow but referenced the
standardization
of various parts used mainly in locomotives, and infrastructure
and to a
lessor extent freight cars.
----- Original Message -----

Again, my impression from what I've read - not researched - was
that this
moniker had more to do with foreign governments believing that
because the
PRR was the biggest, it must also be the best and seeking out
technical and
management help from the PRR to develop and improve their own
systems.
Thus, elsewhere in the world, the PRR was held up as the standard
that a
modern railroad should seek to follow, in other words, "The
Standard
Railroad of the World".

KL