representing cast steel


Bud Rindfleisch
 

Hello again,
Well, OK, my caboose question from a week or so ago was probably
sent to the wrong list, so am trying this "modeling" question. Has
anyone tried to simulate the rough finish of cast steel on styrene? I
saw a couple Krylon spray paints that might have some potential in
their "Fusion" line. Made to spray on plastics, one is just a texture
and the other more of a mottled finish, forget what they call it
offhand. I realize that Krylon is not your average modeler's paint
source so am looking to see if anyone else tried a better way. BTW,
I'm trying to represent a cast steel tender underframe as used on (oh,
oh, here's that caboose word again)a Lackawanna 900 series steel
caboose......as used in the steam era behind steam era freight cars. <G>
Bud Rindfleisch


Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: bud9351

Well, OK, my caboose question from a week or so ago was probably
sent to the wrong list, so am trying this "modeling" question. Has
anyone tried to simulate the rough finish of cast steel on styrene?
----- Original Message -----

Yes. There are several ways.

1. At the hobby look for Mr Surfacer 500 and Mr Surfacer 1000. These are primer-surfacer compounds similar to very thick paint. The 500 uses a coarser filler than the 1000 and gives a correspondingly rougher finish. Just paint them on the plastic and work it a little bit with the brush and/or stipple it. If it gets too rough you can smooth it out with liquid cement or fine sandpaper.

In this photo the gray areas have been covered with Mr Surfacer:
http://www.missing-lynx.com/gallery/usa/t10_zaloga4.jpg

And you can see the effect here:
http://www.missing-lynx.com/gallery/usa/t10_zaloga1.jpg

2. Liquid cement. Paint it on and either leave it or stipple it.

3. Testors or Squadron plastic putty thinned with liquid cement. Paint it on and either leave it or stipple it.

The blue areas are thinned putty:
http://www.missing-lynx.com/gallery/usa/szm4a1-1.jpg

Painted:
http://www.missing-lynx.com/gallery/usa/szm4a1-5.jpg

HTH,
KL


Bud Rindfleisch
 

Kurt,
Thanks for the tips! What scale are those tanks? Fantastic finish
on them. Exactly the appearance I'm looking for! Its not so much the
"finish" itself but the way light reflects on those surfaces as
opposed to surrounding areas.
Bud Rindfleisch


Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton <smokeandsteam@...>
 

I'm not sure you want to go overboard on texture in smaller scales -
my view is that no texture is better than one that is overscale

If you look at a steel casting the texture is that of the foundry sand
- very fine grains whih woudl disappear at all but magnifying glass
distances.

If you need to suggest the effect then the approach I would favour is
the use of matt paint as a ground colour followed by light drybrushing
with a slighly lighter colour. This is easy to overdo; go too far and
you end up with a caricature like some of the over textured military
vehicles or some "quirky but fun" narrow gauge layouts

In larger scales you may be able to use talcum powder as an additive
to your paint to add a little texture or use the Mr Surfacer primers
from Gunze menioned in another reply

Aidrian


jerryglow2
 

I agree for all but small areas where you might want to show massive
rust and/or surface deteriation. Many of the "heavy weathering" guys
(you know - the ones who sell $15 models for $200 on ebay) do this. I
have blown baking soda on wet paint to give texture to concrete and
this might work for what you want.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., "Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton"
<smokeandsteam@...> wrote:

I'm not sure you want to go overboard on texture in smaller scales -
my view is that no texture is better than one that is overscale

If you look at a steel casting the texture is that of the foundry
sand
- very fine grains whih woudl disappear at all but magnifying glass
distances.

If you need to suggest the effect then the approach I would favour
is
the use of matt paint as a ground colour followed by light
drybrushing
with a slighly lighter colour. This is easy to overdo; go too far
and
you end up with a caricature like some of the over textured military
vehicles or some "quirky but fun" narrow gauge layouts

In larger scales you may be able to use talcum powder as an additive
to your paint to add a little texture or use the Mr Surfacer primers
from Gunze menioned in another reply

Aidrian


jaley <jaley@...>
 

Bud and All,

Just to be clear: cabooses are ON TOPIC for STMFC.

Regards,

-Jeff Aley
Deputy Moderator, STMFC

On Jun 5, 1:31am, bud9351 wrote:
Subject: [STMFC] representing cast steel
Hello again,
Well, OK, my caboose question from a week or so ago was probably
sent to the wrong list, so am trying this "modeling" question. Has
anyone tried to simulate the rough finish of cast steel on styrene? I
saw a couple Krylon spray paints that might have some potential in
their "Fusion" line. Made to spray on plastics, one is just a texture
and the other more of a mottled finish, forget what they call it
offhand. I realize that Krylon is not your average modeler's paint
source so am looking to see if anyone else tried a better way. BTW,
I'm trying to represent a cast steel tender underframe as used on (oh,
oh, here's that caboose word again)a Lackawanna 900 series steel
caboose......as used in the steam era behind steam era freight cars. <G>
Bud Rindfleisch
--
Jeff Aley jaley@...
DPG Chipsets Product Engineering
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533


Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: bud9351

Thanks for the tips! What scale are those tanks? Fantastic finish
on them. Exactly the appearance I'm looking for! Its not so much the
"finish" itself but the way light reflects on those surfaces as
opposed to surrounding areas.
----- Original Message -----

Hi Bud:

Those are 1/35 models - and not mine, BTW, but Steve Zaloga's.

Reflective variation is one of the techniques Steve highlights in his seminars and books. If you look at real objects there will be differences in gloss visible (even on things painted the same color) due to weathering, dust, and wear.

I can confirm that the texture shown on Steve's models is quite realistic for the subjects, for example, this Sherman tank turret cast by General Steel Castings of Granite City IL:
http://www.usarmymodels.com/AFV%20PHOTOS/M4%20SHERMAN/M4%20Sherman%20Left%20Turret.jpg

Cast texture did have quite a variation depending on the part and the foundry making it. It ranged from quite smooth to generally coarse along with some that looked like they had been carved, either as a result of grinding off scale or hand working the molds with a trowel. American parts (cast by many of the same foundries as RR parts) were unifirmly smoother than those of other countries, notably the Soviet Union.

If anyone would be interested, I wrote an article on foundry symbols of the WW II era that I could place in the files section. It is definitely tank related but there is a lot of overlap with the foundries making railroad equipment.

KL


Eric
 

Funny you brought this up. I was reading Tamiya's magazine last night
and they were talking about this product.

It's called cast-a-coat. Here's a review of it.

http://misc.kitreview.com/tools/castacoatreviewcs_1.htm

You might want to try it.

Also, Krylon which you mentioned has several different textured
paints. Make It Stone! Metallic Textured Paints, Fusion for Plastic
Fusion Hammered, Krylon Contractor Tread & Grip, Krylon Rust Tough
Hamm-R Finishes. I'm not sure of their suitability for models. They
might be far too coarse. Check their website, Krylon.com


Eric Petersson




Bud Rindfleischwrote:

"Well, OK, my caboose question from a week or so ago was probably
sent to the wrong list, so am trying this "modeling" question. Has
anyone tried to simulate the rough finish of cast steel on styrene? I
saw a couple Krylon spray paints that might have some potential in
their "Fusion" line. Made to spray on plastics, one is just a texture
and the other more of a mottled finish, forget what they call it
offhand. I realize that Krylon is not your average modeler's paint
source so am looking to see if anyone else tried a better way. BTW,
I'm trying to represent a cast steel tender underframe as used on (oh,
oh, here's that caboose word again)a Lackawanna 900 series steel
caboose......as used in the steam era behind steam era freight cars."


Bud Rindfleisch
 

Eric,
Thanks for the heads up on the Tamiya product coming out. Sounds
like another "safe, easier to breathe" way of doing this. I like the
Tamiya line of paints and have had good success using their clear
paints as well as gunmetal for turned off marker lenses. The Krylon
products might also be worth a look at, not having to worry too much
about heavy pigment here.
Bud Rindfleisch


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Is there a sense of the scale of the finish roughness with this product?

SGL
La vita e breve, mangiate prima il dolce!

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On
Behalf Of bud9351
Sent: Wednesday, June 06, 2007 8:35 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] re: representing cast steel

Eric,
Thanks for the heads up on the Tamiya product coming out. Sounds
like another "safe, easier to breathe" way of doing this. I like the
Tamiya line of paints and have had good success using their clear
paints as well as gunmetal for turned off marker lenses. The Krylon
products might also be worth a look at, not having to worry too much
about heavy pigment here.
Bud Rindfleisch





Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Schuyler Larrabee"
<schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

Is there a sense of the scale of the finish roughness with this product?

SGL
That brings up an interesting point. The biggest challenge, to my
mind, in modeling steel castings in HO scale isn't roughness; it's
smoothness. A couple coats of paint mopped on over the years long ago
covered any surface roughness. The distinctive thing about castings is
their smooth, rounded forms; all outside corners are slightly rounded,
and all inside corners have fillets. Often times the fillets have
multiple little gussets worked into them.

Note the details in the image in the link.

http://www.irm.org/gallery/AMOX9499/aaf

The plate and bar stock items all have square edges and sharp corners.
The castings, such as the poling pockets, have radii everywhere. The
structural steel is somewhere in between, as it has fillets in the
inside corners. As to surface finish, it all looks the same.

Dennis


jim peters
 

Kurt,

I'm fascinated with the modeling shown in the photos - and would like to try my hand at the military modeling - are there any sites you would recommend or info you could pass on? OFF LIST OF COARSE

Jim Peters
Coquitlam, BC


From: "Kurt Laughlin" <fleeta@...>
Reply-To: STMFC@...
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] representing cast steel
Date: Mon, 04 Jun 2007 22:37:39 -0400

----- Original Message -----
From: bud9351

Well, OK, my caboose question from a week or so ago was probably
sent to the wrong list, so am trying this "modeling" question. Has
anyone tried to simulate the rough finish of cast steel on styrene?
----- Original Message -----

Yes. There are several ways.

1. At the hobby look for Mr Surfacer 500 and Mr Surfacer 1000. These are
primer-surfacer compounds similar to very thick paint. The 500 uses a
coarser filler than the 1000 and gives a correspondingly rougher finish.
Just paint them on the plastic and work it a little bit with the brush
and/or stipple it. If it gets too rough you can smooth it out with liquid
cement or fine sandpaper.

In this photo the gray areas have been covered with Mr Surfacer:
http://www.missing-lynx.com/gallery/usa/t10_zaloga4.jpg

And you can see the effect here:
http://www.missing-lynx.com/gallery/usa/t10_zaloga1.jpg

2. Liquid cement. Paint it on and either leave it or stipple it.

3. Testors or Squadron plastic putty thinned with liquid cement. Paint it
on and either leave it or stipple it.

The blue areas are thinned putty:
http://www.missing-lynx.com/gallery/usa/szm4a1-1.jpg

Painted:
http://www.missing-lynx.com/gallery/usa/szm4a1-5.jpg

HTH,
KL

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