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Kaolinite and China

Eric Hansmann
 

Greg Martin wrote:

Kaolinite was shipped to the PRR into the Ohio "Tri-State" area for the use in the pottery industry. From my recollection it was shipped to the Potteries in boxcars in the form of "wet Clay cakes" and unloaded to be used in this area's Fine China Industry. East Liverpool, Ohio (my home town) was tauted to be the "Pottery Capitol of the World" at least prior to and just after World War11. During WW2 my father worked unloading these cars for one summer with my uncle. This industry was both destination and orgin traffic for the PRR. These highline potteries doted the landscape of the area with noted producers such as Sterling China and Hall China. I would bet both are likely gone, perhaps not.

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I passed through the East Liverpool area a month ago and noted several interesting industrial structures. The only large facility that seemed to be operating was across the river in Newell, W. Va. The Homer Laughlin China Company has been in operation since the late 1800s and currently employs over 1000 workers.

I am not as familiar with this part of the Mountain State so I do not know what railraod served the Homer Laughlin plant. I know the PRR was on the East Liverpool, Ohio, side. Greg, did the PRR also serve the W. Va. side of the river, too?

Your description of the strong pottery industry in this area intrigues me as it blends well with a strong interest in the Ohio/West Virginia/Pennsylvania glass industry. Both are fabulous industries from the steam era of railroading.

Eric Hansmann
Morgantown, W. Va.

Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

Guyz,

The PRR served the Homer Laughlin China and E M Knowles China Co in Newell WV. They appear in the CT1000 for 1945

Fred Freitas

eric@... wrote:
Greg Martin wrote:

Kaolinite was shipped to the PRR into the Ohio "Tri-State" area for the use in the pottery industry. From my recollection it was shipped to the Potteries in boxcars in the form of "wet Clay cakes" and unloaded to be used in this area's Fine China Industry. East Liverpool, Ohio (my home town) was tauted to be the "Pottery Capitol of the World" at least prior to and just after World War11. During WW2 my father worked unloading these cars for one summer with my uncle. This industry was both destination and orgin traffic for the PRR. These highline potteries doted the landscape of the area with noted producers such as Sterling China and Hall China. I would bet both are likely gone, perhaps not.

====================================

I passed through the East Liverpool area a month ago and noted several interesting industrial structures. The only large facility that seemed to be operating was across the river in Newell, W. Va. The Homer Laughlin China Company has been in operation since the late 1800s and currently employs over 1000 workers.

I am not as familiar with this part of the Mountain State so I do not know what railraod served the Homer Laughlin plant. I know the PRR was on the East Liverpool, Ohio, side. Greg, did the PRR also serve the W. Va. side of the river, too?

Your description of the strong pottery industry in this area intrigues me as it blends well with a strong interest in the Ohio/West Virginia/Pennsylvania glass industry. Both are fabulous industries from the steam era of railroading.

Eric Hansmann
Morgantown, W. Va.

Greg Martin
 

In a message dated 6/27/2007 9:15:58 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
prrinvt@... writes:

Guyz,

The PRR served the Homer Laughlin China and E M Knowles China Co in Newell
WV. They appear in the CT1000 for 1945

Fred Freitas


Dang it Fred I was out of town on business in the LA Basin and returned this
evening only to find you answered my question... Thanks Fred 3^)

GIZE, Next time you all are traveling and you have lunch at an old
diner/cafe and you see one of those old heavy white coffee mugs , check the bottom for
the label, chances are you might fine a good one like my cherished Sterling
China (or also a Hall China). If you do might get lucky and have a keeper...
They are fairly common. I have a set of a mug, creamer and tea pot (the Tea
pot and creamer I have came from a diner in Tehachapi, CA where I lived prior
to moving to Salem, OR) and talk the owner into selling it to you.

When I was a kid growing up the Men in most East Liverpool neighborhoods
would toss porcelain door knobs like cow-pokes pitch horse shoes only the
difference was the ringers were tossed into a tobacco/coffee cans, quite a skill
and fun to watch...

These types of items would be very commonly shipped by rail throughout the
country and in boxcars (mandatory freight car content) in barrels or crates...


Greg Martin



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