sewer pipes


Edward Dabler
 

In a message dated 6/28/2007 2:53:34 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
ed_mines@yahoo.com writes:

Anyone familiar with clay sewer pipes in the '40s? How about cast iron
sewer pipes?

Clay was used for sanitary sewers. Cast iron pipe was typically used for
transmission of water.



What were the most common sizes? Colors?
Clay pipe is typically reddish brown. Think earth tone because that's what
it is. Clay pipe comes in many sizes. 4, 6, 8,10, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 30
and 36 inch. However any size larger than 12 to 15 inches in diameter would
be fairly uncommon.
Cast iron pipe is usually black in color. It is/was available in the same
sizes as clay pipe. 8, 10 and 12 inch diameter pipe is quite common in
municipal water systems. Larger sizes, 24, 30 and 36 inch pipe, is found more
frequently in water systems than in sanitary sewer collection systems.



Any reason why they couldn't be loaded into gons?

None that I can think of. Clay pipe was typically cast in 4 or 5 foot
lengths while cast iron pipe was cast in 10 foot or greater lengths.



Ed


Ed Dabler, P.E.



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Charles Hladik
 

Rust-O-Leum "Terra Cotta" spray paint is a perfect match for clay (terra
cotta) pipes, Spanish tile roofs also.
Chuck Hladik



************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com.


ed_mines
 

Anyone familiar with clay sewer pipes in the '40s? How about cast iron
sewer pipes?

What were the most common sizes? Colors?

Any reason why they couldn't be loaded into gons?


Ed


Bruce Smith
 

On Jun 28, 2007, at 2:52 PM, ed_mines wrote:

Anyone familiar with clay sewer pipes in the '40s? How about cast iron
sewer pipes?

What were the most common sizes? Colors?
How about octagonal wooden pipes? A WWII war emergency program built wooden pipe in a wide variety of sizes.
Steel pipe - thousands of gon loads of 24" and 20" pipe went into the building of the "big inch" and "little inch" pipelines in 1942-43.

Any reason why they couldn't be loaded into gons?
None, of course.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
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Raymond Young
 

Hello,

During the '40s to about 1965, there was a petroleum-based sewer pipe called Orangeburg. It was cheaper than cast iron, but it was a poor substitute. It lacked the rigidity and strength of cast iron. It sagged, allowed tree roots to enter the joints easily and seemed to be the material of choice for most contractors. Most building codes have outlawed its use in tha last 40 years. It was about 6 inches in diameter and had a rusty tan color. I'm sure it was shipped in gons and on flats. Rejoice that it's gone.

Virgil Young
Amarillo, TX

Bruce Smith <smithbf@auburn.edu> wrote:

On Jun 28, 2007, at 2:52 PM, ed_mines wrote:

Anyone familiar with clay sewer pipes in the '40s? How about cast iron
sewer pipes?

What were the most common sizes? Colors?
How about octagonal wooden pipes? A WWII war emergency program built
wooden pipe in a wide variety of sizes.
Steel pipe - thousands of gon loads of 24" and 20" pipe went into the
building of the "big inch" and "little inch" pipelines in 1942-43.

Any reason why they couldn't be loaded into gons?
None, of course.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


cj riley <cjriley42@...>
 

Train Shed Cyc No 36 (1919) includes loading diagrans for cast iron, wrought
iron and concrete pipes in flats and gons. I'm sure Ive seen clay pipes in both
gons and box cars.

CJ Riley

--- rrfaned@aol.com wrote:

In a message dated 6/28/2007 2:53:34 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
ed_mines@yahoo.com writes:

Anyone familiar with clay sewer pipes in the '40s? How about cast iron
sewer pipes?

Clay was used for sanitary sewers. Cast iron pipe was typically used for
transmission of water.



What were the most common sizes? Colors?
Clay pipe is typically reddish brown. Think earth tone because that's what
it is. Clay pipe comes in many sizes. 4, 6, 8,10, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 30
and 36 inch. However any size larger than 12 to 15 inches in diameter would

be fairly uncommon.
Cast iron pipe is usually black in color. It is/was available in the same
sizes as clay pipe. 8, 10 and 12 inch diameter pipe is quite common in
municipal water systems. Larger sizes, 24, 30 and 36 inch pipe, is found
more
frequently in water systems than in sanitary sewer collection systems.



Any reason why they couldn't be loaded into gons?

None that I can think of. Clay pipe was typically cast in 4 or 5 foot
lengths while cast iron pipe was cast in 10 foot or greater lengths.



Ed


Ed Dabler, P.E.



************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com.







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Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, rrfaned@... wrote:

In a message dated 6/28/2007 2:53:34 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
ed_mines@... writes:

Anyone familiar with clay sewer pipes in the '40s? How about cast iron
sewer pipes?

Clay was used for sanitary sewers. Cast iron pipe was typically
used for
transmission of water.
Except when used in buildings and other above grade (not buried)
applications. Clay pipe is just too fragile to use where it won't be
buried. Typical use in Chicago during the steam era was 4", 6", and 8"
C.I. pipe used for DWV (Drain, Waste, and Vent) within the building,
changing to similar sized clay where it went through the basement
floor or foundation wall. This was all "bell & spigot" pipe, the
straight end, the spigot, fit into the larger diameter bell and was
sealed with oakum and mortar for clay pipe; lead for C.I. In recent
years rubber gaskets have been developed for C.I. pipe and lead is not
used any longer.

What is lacking is information on the length of these pipes. I don't
ever remember seeing clay pipe any longer than 3', which made for a
lot of joints. C.I was available in 5' and 10' lengths, at least in
the smaller sizes. Large water service pipe was available in 20'
lengths, and maybe longer.

There was / is also a hubless clay pipe available in about 2' lengths
for use as drain tile; this was laid with the joints slightly open and
a layer of gravel for perimeter drains outside of foundations.

All these products were reasonably fragile, and would be palletized
after WWII, except for the largest sizes, which would be stacked on
blocking in gons.

Clay pipe was glazed and fired, and was a glossy medium brown or
reddish brown. Drain tile was not glazed, and was more or less the
color of flower pots. Cast iron was dipped in something at manufacture
that made it shiny black.

Dennis


John F. Cizmar
 

Dennis,
F.Y.I. Lead and oakum is still used to connect cast iron bell & spigot (cast iron) soil pipe in the Chicago. We sell tons of ingot lead for this purpose every year.
John F. Cizmar
SG Supply Company
Calumet Park, Illinois

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@mchsi.com> wrote:
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, rrfaned@... wrote:

In a message dated 6/28/2007 2:53:34 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
ed_mines@... writes:

Anyone familiar with clay sewer pipes in the '40s? How about cast iron
sewer pipes?

Clay was used for sanitary sewers. Cast iron pipe was typically
used for
transmission of water.
Except when used in buildings and other above grade (not buried)
applications. Clay pipe is just too fragile to use where it won't be
buried. Typical use in Chicago during the steam era was 4", 6", and 8"
C.I. pipe used for DWV (Drain, Waste, and Vent) within the building,
changing to similar sized clay where it went through the basement
floor or foundation wall. This was all "bell & spigot" pipe, the
straight end, the spigot, fit into the larger diameter bell and was
sealed with oakum and mortar for clay pipe; lead for C.I. In recent
years rubber gaskets have been developed for C.I. pipe and lead is not
used any longer.

What is lacking is information on the length of these pipes. I don't
ever remember seeing clay pipe any longer than 3', which made for a
lot of joints. C.I was available in 5' and 10' lengths, at least in
the smaller sizes. Large water service pipe was available in 20'
lengths, and maybe longer.

There was / is also a hubless clay pipe available in about 2' lengths
for use as drain tile; this was laid with the joints slightly open and
a layer of gravel for perimeter drains outside of foundations.

All these products were reasonably fragile, and would be palletized
after WWII, except for the largest sizes, which would be stacked on
blocking in gons.

Clay pipe was glazed and fired, and was a glossy medium brown or
reddish brown. Drain tile was not glazed, and was more or less the
color of flower pots. Cast iron was dipped in something at manufacture
that made it shiny black.

Dennis






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Douglas Harding <dharding@...>
 

And don't forget Orangeburg. A sewar pipe made with tarpaper during or after
WWII.
http://www.sewerhistory.org/grfx/components/pipe-orng1.htm

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org

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10:56 AM


Jim Betz
 

In the early 50's in my home town (a small town North of Seattle) my
neighborhood was upgraded to city sewers. Before that all the houses in
the neighborhood were on septic tanks. Large (3 ft?) concrete pipe came
into town in gons and was transferred to trucks for local transit. In
addition, each house was connected up to the new sewer running down the
street using smaller pipe that was probably about 8" in diameter or so.
I'm guessing that the size of the pipe was related to the mains also acting
as part of the storm drain system - we are talking Western Washington
here.
The crews putting in the mains finally had to take to pushing a dozer
blade load of dirt over the open end of the pipe each day to keep the
kids (like me) from playing in the new pipes after they knocked off for
the day. Then every morning they would uncover that end and go after it
some more.
I remember that they would do one or two blocks a day - but I could be
wrong on that. This was a big project that converted a lot of houses
from septic to sewer. There was an assessment to each house on the
street and I remember my folks grumbling about being required to pay the
assessment whether they connected up or not. But it was all done over
time and the connection to the house was cheap enough and it did make
things in the neighborhood better.