D.I.C.X. Dry ice car, unknown maker.


Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Amongst a recent purchase of largely-derelict ancient HO freight car models is a neatly-built generally-presentable double-sheath wood 40' reefer D.I.C.X 115 "DRY ICE" REFRIGERATOR LINE. The body is wood (identical or near identical to Varney in construction). The sides are printed cardstock with neat embossed planking very similar to Varney, while the "dreadnaught" ends are printed photo-rotogravure very much like the very earliest Varneys- i.e. as in 1936 and later. The lettering is black on white sides. There are no ladders or grabs on the sides, although there are neatly applied wire grabs serving as ladders on the ends. A vertical brake staff and platform are missing, as is the running board. The roof ribs are very fine square wood stock.

The trucks are of a type I have never seen before: three cast white metal pieces with the bolsters keyed to the side frames with flexible pieces of shaped rubber moldings- pretty sophisticated and not bad looking for the period. The wheels look like Varney (brass). I have a feeling that these trucks are probably from a different supplier. Some have guessed that the trucks are MicroMotive.

There is no record that Varney had car sides of this type (its R-19 Dry Ice car was of a car of steel construction). Red Ball is always a suspect with printed sides : these sides are not in the 1941 catalogue, and many of M.D. Newton's designs later were destroyed in Red Ball's 1943 fire.

Does this description ring any bells. Megow? Lehigh? Binkley? Laconia?

Who knows about D.I.C.X. ?

Denny


--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

Hi Doc,

You've got an antique worthy of restoration. Sounds like a Kaisner kit, will check with my friendly expert on kits pre 1950. IIRC, the painting looks similar to the white MDT scheme with the stripe on the botom of the side.
Other than the obvious, Dry Ice Corporation X, I'm not very familiar with the routings of these cars. Given the era, there has to be a good bit of info for them in someone's research pile and some old ORER's. Let us know how you restore this gem to operational quality.

Fred Freitas

Denny Anspach <danspach@macnexus.org> wrote:

Amongst a recent purchase of largely-derelict ancient HO freight car
models is a neatly-built generally-presentable double-sheath wood 40'
reefer D.I.C.X 115 "DRY ICE" REFRIGERATOR LINE. The body is wood
(identical or near identical to Varney in construction). The sides
are printed cardstock with neat embossed planking very similar to
Varney, while the "dreadnaught" ends are printed photo-rotogravure
very much like the very earliest Varneys- i.e. as in 1936 and later.
The lettering is black on white sides. There are no ladders or grabs
on the sides, although there are neatly applied wire grabs serving as
ladders on the ends. A vertical brake staff and platform are missing,
as is the running board. The roof ribs are very fine square wood
stock.

The trucks are of a type I have never seen before: three cast white
metal pieces with the bolsters keyed to the side frames with flexible
pieces of shaped rubber moldings- pretty sophisticated and not bad
looking for the period. The wheels look like Varney (brass). I have a
feeling that these trucks are probably from a different supplier.
Some have guessed that the trucks are MicroMotive.

There is no record that Varney had car sides of this type (its R-19
Dry Ice car was of a car of steel construction). Red Ball is always
a suspect with printed sides : these sides are not in the 1941
catalogue, and many of M.D. Newton's designs later were destroyed in
Red Ball's 1943 fire.

Does this description ring any bells. Megow? Lehigh? Binkley? Laconia?

Who knows about D.I.C.X. ?

Denny

--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

three cast white
metal pieces with the bolsters keyed to the side frames with flexible
pieces of shaped rubber moldings<

I remember these but don't remember the manufacture. I believe they were short lived and it was a manufacturing solution to have to assemble 4 springs for each truck. It was quick and simple to push the rubber piece in place.

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Tom Madden <tgmadden@...>
 

Denny Anspach wrote:

Amongst a recent purchase of largely-derelict ancient HO freight
car models is a neatly-built generally-presentable double-sheath
wood 40' reefer D.I.C.X 115 "DRY ICE" REFRIGERATOR LINE.
[snip]

There is no record that Varney had car sides of this type (its
R-19 Dry Ice car was of a car of steel construction). Red Ball is
always a suspect with printed sides : these sides are not in the
1941 catalogue, and many of M.D. Newton's designs later were
destroyed in Red Ball's 1943 fire.
Pretty sure it's Red Ball. I don't have many MR's before 1948, but I
recall seeing the Red Ball dry ice reefer sides as a cardstock
insert in an issue of MR from the 1939-1942 time frame. That
recollection is from viewing a co-worker's old MR's back in the mid-
60's, but you might browse through your (or the museum library's)
old MR's and see if the insert is there. Sometimes MR only included
such inserts in subscriber's copies, but being on heavier cardstock
it should reveal its presence pretty quickly if you fan the pages
with your thumb.

Tom Madden


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jul 9, 2007, at 7:27 AM, Denny Anspach wrote:

Amongst a recent purchase of largely-derelict ancient HO freight car
models is a neatly-built generally-presentable double-sheath wood 40'
reefer D.I.C.X 115 "DRY ICE" REFRIGERATOR LINE.
[snip]

Who knows about D.I.C.X. ?
DCIX cars were operated for the Pure Carbonic Co., a subsidiary of the
Air Research Corp., by the Merchants Despatch Transportation Co.
division of the New York Central System.

The cars were essentially MDT reefers without ice bunkers and with
extra heavy insulation. They were painted white and had red and blue
stripes at the bottom of the sides, as on standard MDT cars prior to
(and, in the case of some steel cars, just after) World War II. I have
three photos of wood sheathed DCIX cars which I can scan if they would
be helpful.

Richard Hendrickson


armprem
 

Denny,September 1948 MR has an ad for a Mathieson Dry Ice Reefer by Laconia,$ 2.35 with trucks ,$1.50 without.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "Denny Anspach" <danspach@macnexus.org>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, July 09, 2007 10:27 AM
Subject: [STMFC] D.I.C.X. Dry ice car, unknown maker.



Amongst a recent purchase of largely-derelict ancient HO freight car
models is a neatly-built generally-presentable double-sheath wood 40'
reefer D.I.C.X 115 "DRY ICE" REFRIGERATOR LINE. The body is wood
(identical or near identical to Varney in construction). The sides
are printed cardstock with neat embossed planking very similar to
Varney, while the "dreadnaught" ends are printed photo-rotogravure
very much like the very earliest Varneys- i.e. as in 1936 and later.
The lettering is black on white sides. There are no ladders or grabs
on the sides, although there are neatly applied wire grabs serving as
ladders on the ends. A vertical brake staff and platform are missing,
as is the running board. The roof ribs are very fine square wood
stock.

The trucks are of a type I have never seen before: three cast white
metal pieces with the bolsters keyed to the side frames with flexible
pieces of shaped rubber moldings- pretty sophisticated and not bad
looking for the period. The wheels look like Varney (brass). I have a
feeling that these trucks are probably from a different supplier.
Some have guessed that the trucks are MicroMotive.

There is no record that Varney had car sides of this type (its R-19
Dry Ice car was of a car of steel construction). Red Ball is always
a suspect with printed sides : these sides are not in the 1941
catalogue, and many of M.D. Newton's designs later were destroyed in
Red Ball's 1943 fire.

Does this description ring any bells. Megow? Lehigh? Binkley? Laconia?

Who knows about D.I.C.X. ?

Denny


--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento



Yahoo! Groups Links



benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Armand Premo wrote:
"Denny, September 1948 MR has an ad for a Mathieson Dry Ice Reefer by
Laconia, $2.35 with trucks, $1.50 without."

I have two of these Laconia cars - it's not the same model that Denny
is asking about.


Ben Hom


Paul <buygone@...>
 

Armand:



I have one of those kits un-built; it is not like what Denny described.



Paul C. Koehler



_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Armand Premo
Sent: Monday, July 09, 2007 10:41 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] D.I.C.X. Dry ice car, unknown maker.



Denny,September 1948 MR has an ad for a Mathieson Dry Ice Reefer by
Laconia,$ 2.35 with trucks ,$1.50 without.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "Denny Anspach" <danspach@macnexus. <mailto:danspach%40macnexus.org>
org>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> com>
Sent: Monday, July 09, 2007 10:27 AM
Subject: [STMFC] D.I.C.X. Dry ice car, unknown maker.


Amongst a recent purchase of largely-derelict ancient HO freight car
models is a neatly-built generally-presentable double-sheath wood 40'
reefer D.I.C.X 115 "DRY ICE" REFRIGERATOR LINE. The body is wood
(identical or near identical to Varney in construction). The sides
are printed cardstock with neat embossed planking very similar to
Varney, while the "dreadnaught" ends are printed photo-rotogravure
very much like the very earliest Varneys- i.e. as in 1936 and later.
The lettering is black on white sides. There are no ladders or grabs
on the sides, although there are neatly applied wire grabs serving as
ladders on the ends. A vertical brake staff and platform are missing,
as is the running board. The roof ribs are very fine square wood
stock.

The trucks are of a type I have never seen before: three cast white
metal pieces with the bolsters keyed to the side frames with flexible
pieces of shaped rubber moldings- pretty sophisticated and not bad
looking for the period. The wheels look like Varney (brass). I have a
feeling that these trucks are probably from a different supplier.
Some have guessed that the trucks are MicroMotive.

There is no record that Varney had car sides of this type (its R-19
Dry Ice car was of a car of steel construction). Red Ball is always
a suspect with printed sides : these sides are not in the 1941
catalogue, and many of M.D. Newton's designs later were destroyed in
Red Ball's 1943 fire.

Does this description ring any bells. Megow? Lehigh? Binkley? Laconia?

Who knows about D.I.C.X. ?

Denny


--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento



Yahoo! Groups Links



Charlie Vlk
 

IIRC Athearn kits came with unassembled trucks with rubber "springs" for a brief time in the early sixties, either as a cost-cutting move or
expedient to a spring shortage.
Charlie Vlk


rhinman@...
 

Except for an experimental car built by ACF, all of the DICX cars were MDT standard refrigerator cars modified for this service by building insert kits and in many cases had special door assemblies added. MDT had the service contract with Dry Ice Corp and its successors from the early 1930s until the late 1960s. I could supply car type for most any car in this range. I'm on travel this week and don't have access to my records but DICX 115 is probably the M4 car modified for this service.

I also have at home, two older O scale cars, mfg unknown, of DICX cars in a similar low number range. What was interesting to me is the re-weigh data on the models appears correct and was probably taken from a photo. I have never seen a confirming photo of any DICX car less than 120 but do ihave dispostion records that indicate year built


Roger Hinman