Coins as car weights


Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Philip Dove comments-

I frequently use English 2p coins as weights as they are a definite weight and cost less than wheel balance weights and a Line weights. Cents might be too light and quarters to expensive in the USA.
Heh, heh! Well, Philip is so right about the cost of weights.

I have a number of cars weighted down with Belgian francs, Russian rubles, Polish zlotys, and Thai baht, as well as odds and ends of other foreign coinage either unreturnable or unconvertible. I often wonder what one of the next car owners will say when one of these cars at last bites the dust.

I still have have a bag full of Danish and Norwegian Kroner yet to go.

Denny

--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Okoboji, Iowa


benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Denny Anspach wrote:
"I have a number of cars weighted down with Belgian francs, Russian
rubles, Polish zlotys, and Thai baht, as well as odds and ends of
other foreign coinage either unreturnable or unconvertible. I often
wonder what one of the next car owners will say when one of these
cars at last bites the dust.

I still have have a bag full of Danish and Norwegian Kroner yet to go."

Might want to hang on to those Scandanavian coins just yet as they
haven't gone over to the euro; however, all those francs, centimes,
lire, etc. coins which are now demonetized are fair game!
http://europeforvisitors.com/europe/articles/euro.htm
http://europeforvisitors.com/europe/articles/euro2.htm


Ben Hom


Eric
 

According to the US Mint, pennies weigh 2.5 grams or about 11.34
coins per oz. Quarters weigh only 0.67 grams more than nickels, which
weigh 5 grams, so that's an extra 20¢ for a 0.67 grams, so there's no
reason to use them. Nickels are 5.67 coins per oz.

Costwise, pennies are $1.81 per pound, about 11¢ per oz. Nickels are
$4.54 per pound, about 28¢ per oz

Pennies are 0.750" in diameter and 0.061" thick. Nickels are 0.835"
in diameter and 0.077" thick.

Plus you can get them at any bank.


Eric Petersson


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

eric petersson wrote:
Costwise, pennies are $1.81 per pound, about 11¢ per oz. Nickels are
$4.54 per pound, about 28¢ per oz
Go to your hardware store and buy a strip of plain steel, around
3/4-inch wide and 1/8 inch thick. It's soft and cuts easily with a
hacksaw, costs about 5 cents an ounce, and works fine. Makes a nice
size weight in a single piece.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Tim O'Connor
 

I've been in a lot of hardware stores, and I've never seen that
for sale before. It would be very nice to find... Perhaps the World's
Greatest Hardware Store stocks it?

How much is lead flashing per pound? I have a roll of it (about 1/8
inch thick) but I don't recall what I paid for it.

Tim O'Connor

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@signaturepress.com>

Go to your hardware store and buy a strip of plain steel, around
3/4-inch wide and 1/8 inch thick. It's soft and cuts easily with a
hacksaw, costs about 5 cents an ounce, and works fine. Makes a nice
size weight in a single piece.


Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

Go to your hardware store and buy a strip of plain steel,<
But steel is magnetic. Lead is good but hard to get these days. Wheel weights are not bad (lead) but you need to mail-order in CA. Copper and brass are expensive.


Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Tim O'Connor
 

Unless the steel is axle-height, I don't think it's going to have
any effect unless you're using super-magnets for uncouplers.
Plenty of models come with steel weights.

Tim O'Connor

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: "Jon Miller" <atsf@inow.com>

Go to your hardware store and buy a strip of plain steel,<
But steel is magnetic.


Miller, Andrew S. <asmiller@...>
 

Only because you live in California Jon. In the rest of the world no
one worries about children climbing on roofs to eat the flashing, and
sheet lead is readily available at Home Depot - even here in the
People's Democratic Republic of Massachusetts.

regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
On Behalf Of Jon Miller

Lead is good but hard to get these days.

Jon Miller
AT&SF



Yahoo! Groups Links


Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Tim,

Kadee under-the-track magnets can attract steel car weights at floor level. Hard to see, but I've had cars equipped with super free-rolling trucks like Kato's actually move by themselves toward the magnets.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

timboconnor@comcast.net wrote:

Unless the steel is axle-height, I don't think it's going to have
any effect unless you're using super-magnets for uncouplers.
Plenty of models come with steel weights.

Tim O'Connor


Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
 

You can order .040" and .062" lead sheet online from Small Parts Inc.,
www.smallparts.com. The 40 thou comes out to 37 cents an ounce in 12"-square
sheets, and the 62 thou is 40 cents an ounce in the same size sheet. Of
course, that's before you add in shipping charges from Florida, but if you
don't mind paying for convenience, there it is. (Pennies are definitely
cheaper, easily available, and non-magnetic, but they aren't as dense, which
counts for a lot when weighting flats and gons. They're harder to cut, too!)

So long,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
Model Railroader magazine
asperandeo@mrmag.com
262-796-8776, ext. 461
FAX 262-796-1142


BERNARD SPINELLI <bspinelli@...>
 

on 8/14/07 11:48 AM, Garth G. Groff at ggg9y@virginia.edu wrote:

Tim,

Kadee under-the-track magnets can attract steel car weights at floor
level. Hard to see, but I've had cars equipped with super free-rolling
trucks like Kato's actually move by themselves toward the magnets.

Kind regards,

Garth G. Groff

timboconnor@comcast.net <mailto:timboconnor%40comcast.net> wrote:
Unless the steel is axle-height, I don't think it's going to have
any effect unless you're using super-magnets for uncouplers.
Plenty of models come with steel weights.

Tim O'Connor
Go out a buy a bag of lead shot #8 at any gun shop. It will last you a
lifetime & will fit in any spot on a car. Use epoxy to set the shot. bernie
spinelli


SUVCWORR@...
 

In a message dated 8/14/2007 12:52:03 PM Eastern Daylight Time, atsf@inow.com
writes:

But steel is magnetic. Lead is good but hard to get these days. Wheel
weights are not bad (lead) but you need to mail-order in CA. Copper and
brass are expensive.
Go to your local garage and ask them to keep the weights they remove from
wheels for you. If you don't mind the potential exposure and keep any kids away,
you can melt the wheel weights and pour the molten lead into sheets. Just
avoid breathing the fumes. It is best to do this outside.

Rich orr


**************************************
Get a sneak peek of the
all-new AOL at http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Rich Orr wrote:
Go to your local garage and ask them to keep the weights they remove from wheels for you. If you don't mind the potential exposure and keep any kids away, you can melt the wheel weights and pour the molten lead into sheets. Just avoid breathing the fumes. It is best to do this outside.
Sound advice, because there are things like antimony in the lead that aren't good for you. But should you worry about the lead? In reality, the vapor pressure of liquid lead is extremely low. There will not be enough lead vapor that it could even be measured, unless you have a spectrograph. (Of course, I don't recommend leaning over the bath and breathing deeply from right above the melt.)

Anthony Thompson
Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
thompsonmarytony@sbcglobal.net


Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Tony,

I know we've disagreed about this before, and I certainly respect your scientific knowledge. However, my father used to melt lead tire weights just as described. He was later diagnosed with lead poisoning.

I don't think melting lead is a good idea at all, and if it is done at all, it should be outside as described in the post.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff



Anthony Thompson wrote:

Rich Orr wrote:

Go to your local garage and ask them to keep the weights they remove from wheels for you. If you don't mind the potential exposure and keep any kids away, you can melt the wheel weights and pour the molten lead into sheets. Just avoid breathing the fumes. It is best to do this outside.
Sound advice, because there are things like antimony in the lead that aren't good for you. But should you worry about the lead? In reality, the vapor pressure of liquid lead is extremely low. There will not be enough lead vapor that it could even be measured, unless you have a spectrograph. (Of course, I don't recommend leaning over the bath and breathing deeply from right above the melt.)

Anthony Thompson
Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
thompsonmarytony@sbcglobal.net


Lawrence Rast
 

Another option are lead ingots from Bass Pro Shops. Come to about $1.80 per
pound. Easily cut to 1/4, 1/2, 1 oz. sizes and attached with epoxy. Just
be careful when handling. As BPS's site says, "Do not place product in your
mouth."

Best,
Lawrence Rast

On 8/14/07, Anthony Thompson <thompson@signaturepress.com> wrote:

Rich Orr wrote:
Go to your local garage and ask them to keep the weights they remove
from wheels for you. If you don't mind the potential exposure and
keep any kids away, you can melt the wheel weights and pour the molten
lead into sheets. Just avoid breathing the fumes. It is best to do
this outside.
Sound advice, because there are things like antimony in the lead
that aren't good for you. But should you worry about the lead? In
reality, the vapor pressure of liquid lead is extremely low. There will
not be enough lead vapor that it could even be measured, unless you
have a spectrograph. (Of course, I don't recommend leaning over the
bath and breathing deeply from right above the melt.)

Anthony Thompson
Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
thompsonmarytony@sbcglobal.net <thompsonmarytony%40sbcglobal.net>



Ljack70117@...
 

Did he smoke while melting lead. That will do you in in a hurry.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@comcast.net
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left

On Aug 15, 2007, at 7:03 AM, Garth G. Groff wrote:

Tony,

I know we've disagreed about this before, and I certainly respect your
scientific knowledge. However, my father used to melt lead tire weights
just as described. He was later diagnosed with lead poisoning.

I don't think melting lead is a good idea at all, and if it is done at
all, it should be outside as described in the post.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff



Anthony Thompson wrote:
Rich Orr wrote:

Go to your local garage and ask them to keep the weights they remove
from wheels for you. If you don't mind the potential exposure and
keep any kids away, you can melt the wheel weights and pour the molten
lead into sheets. Just avoid breathing the fumes. It is best to do
this outside.
Sound advice, because there are things like antimony in the lead
that aren't good for you. But should you worry about the lead? In
reality, the vapor pressure of liquid lead is extremely low. There will
not be enough lead vapor that it could even be measured, unless you
have a spectrograph. (Of course, I don't recommend leaning over the
bath and breathing deeply from right above the melt.)

Anthony Thompson
Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
thompsonmarytony@sbcglobal.net




Yahoo! Groups Links



Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Larry,

Good point, but no, my father never smoked in his life. Maybe that's why he's almost 91.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Ljack70117@comcast.net wrote:

Did he smoke while melting lead. That will do you in in a hurry.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@comcast.net
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left




On Aug 15, 2007, at 7:03 AM, Garth G. Groff wrote:


Tony,

I know we've disagreed about this before, and I certainly respect your
scientific knowledge. However, my father used to melt lead tire weights
just as described. He was later diagnosed with lead poisoning.

I don't think melting lead is a good idea at all, and if it is done at
all, it should be outside as described in the post.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff



Anthony Thompson wrote:

Rich Orr wrote:


Go to your local garage and ask them to keep the weights they remove
from wheels for you. If you don't mind the potential exposure and
keep any kids away, you can melt the wheel weights and pour the molten
lead into sheets. Just avoid breathing the fumes. It is best to do
this outside.

Sound advice, because there are things like antimony in the lead
that aren't good for you. But should you worry about the lead? In
reality, the vapor pressure of liquid lead is extremely low. There will
not be enough lead vapor that it could even be measured, unless you
have a spectrograph. (Of course, I don't recommend leaning over the
bath and breathing deeply from right above the melt.)

Anthony Thompson
Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
thompsonmarytony@sbcglobal.net



Yahoo! Groups Links





Yahoo! Groups Links




Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Garth G. Groff wrote:
I know we've disagreed about this before, and I certainly respect your scientific knowledge. However, my father used to melt lead tire weights just as described. He was later diagnosed with lead poisoning.
Handling lead with bare hands gets the oxide onto your skin, and may get it into your mouth or nose. I'd worry about that part, not about the lead vapor.
Please do not think I was saying lead is harmless or that you can treat it cavalierly. Care is needed.
And by the way, Garth, if your father is 91 the lead must not have been TOO bad for him <meant in jest, of course>.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Manfred Lorenz
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Sound advice, because there are things like antimony in the
lead
that aren't good for you. But should you worry about the lead? In
reality, the vapor pressure of liquid lead is extremely low. There
will
not be enough lead vapor that it could even be measured, unless you
have a spectrograph. (Of course, I don't recommend leaning over the
bath and breathing deeply from right above the melt.)
I have heard that most lead (at least in Germany) is somewhat
contaminated by irradiation. Lead gets recycled many times over. Every
bit might have a history of having been engaged in the medical
business. This will show later on when its reincarnation into something
superficially harmless doesn't hint at its properties previously
acquired.

Manfred


Peter Weiglin
 

Lawrence Rast wrote:

Another option are lead ingots from Bass Pro Shops. Come to about $1.80 per
pound. Easily cut to 1/4, 1/2, 1 oz. sizes and attached with epoxy. Just
be careful when handling. As BPS's site says, "Do not place product in your
mouth."
= = =

And then I asked, "Why not just use the pennies? That designer lead sold in hobby shops is expensive.

So -- Nine pennies is just under one ounce. .984 of an ounce.
Ten pennies is 1.093 ounces.

Apply adhesive, and weights cost nine or ten cents per ounce.

But wait! Subsequent measurements showed that eleven pennies .0970 ounce.
Ten pennies is 1.058 ounces.

How come? Research followed. Turns out there two different weights for pennies, depending on when they were minted. Sometime in 1982, the metallic composition of the penny was changed, and the newer pennies are lighter. Pennies minted before 1982 gave the first set of numbers above, pennies minted after 1982 gave the second set.

No, I didn't have any 1982 pennies to check; I don't know if they changed at the end of a year or during 1982.

So, although it against the law to use pennies for other than their intended purpose, one could glue the requisite number of pennies inside a house car to weight it. Might even tack-solder groups of pennies together.


Peter Weiglin
Amelia, OH