Topics

Freight Car Music


Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Well, my freight car music is on the order of Brahms, Beethoven, Dvorshak, Grieg, and Puccini; and is unlikely ever to change. Any choral music gets the nod, but Wagner in any form does not. Meredith Wilson's "Seventy Sick Trombones" is a favorite, as well as just about any other piece of music from the "Music Man"- not excluding the hypnotic rythmic chanting of the salesmen in the song "Rock Island" (yes) riding the cushions into Mason City. Arthur Honegger's "Pacific 231" probably gets as close as any to true "railroad music" otherwise.

Music is my constant companion when I am either at the bench or the layout. At the present I am listening to a lovely Ravel violin sonata :-) , while a taking a needed break from crawling around on the floor trying to find in the dark the ONLY remaining lateral running board grab iron screw eye within a hundred miles >:-o .

Denny
--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Miller, Andrew S. <asmiller@...>
 

Denny,

Have you ever wondered if 231 was the number of the loco or if Arthur
Honegger merely misunderstood the European wheel designation of the
Pacific?

regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
On Behalf Of Denny Anspach

. . .
Arthur Honegger's
"Pacific 231" probably gets as close as any to true "railroad music"
otherwise.


Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Denny Anspach writes:

"Well, my freight car music is on the order of Brahms, Beethoven,
Dvorshak, Grieg, and Puccini; and is unlikely ever to change."

While it is difficult to say that this thread is within scope, it IS [ I think ] rather harmless [ thank goodness ]. I mean...we aren't going to get into a dispute about music are we? So...I'll offer this. My favorite music to listen to while working on resin frt car kits is the soft, lingering, melodic sounds of large steam engines working slowly up grade. I spent the period 1980-2004 chasing various examples around the US shooting film and video and, of course, did many sound recordings. The only real problem with my choice of "music" is the occasional time when I'm trying to add a delicate part...say a door stop...to a box car side when the engineer of, say, N&W 2-6-6-4 1218 decided to blow its "hooter" whistle. Maybe that's why my per centage of success at applying certain tiny parts is not that good when listening to MY music. Maybe I should try something less strident...like Bohemian chants.

Mike Brock

Any
choral music gets the nod, but Wagner in any form does not. Meredith
Wilson's "Seventy Sick Trombones" is a favorite, as well as just
about any other piece of music from the "Music Man"- not excluding
the hypnotic rythmic chanting of the salesmen in the song "Rock
Island" (yes) riding the cushions into Mason City. Arthur Honegger's
"Pacific 231" probably gets as close as any to true "railroad music"
otherwise.

Music is my constant companion when I am either at the bench or the
layout. At the present I am listening to a lovely Ravel violin sonata
:-) , while a taking a needed break from crawling around on the floor
trying to find in the dark the ONLY remaining lateral running board
grab iron screw eye within a hundred miles >:-o .

Denny
--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Ljack70117@...
 

I have not listened to music in over 30 years. Talk Radio is the answer.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@comcast.net
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left

On Aug 15, 2007, at 10:57 AM, Mike Brock wrote:


Denny Anspach writes:

"Well, my freight car music is on the order of Brahms, Beethoven,
Dvorshak, Grieg, and Puccini; and is unlikely ever to change."

While it is difficult to say that this thread is within scope, it IS [ I
think ] rather harmless [ thank goodness ]. I mean...we aren't going to get
into a dispute about music are we? So...I'll offer this. My favorite music
to listen to while working on resin frt car kits is the soft, lingering,
melodic sounds of large steam engines working slowly up grade. I spent the
period 1980-2004 chasing various examples around the US shooting film and
video and, of course, did many sound recordings. The only real problem with
my choice of "music" is the occasional time when I'm trying to add a
delicate part...say a door stop...to a box car side when the engineer of,
say, N&W 2-6-6-4 1218 decided to blow its "hooter" whistle. Maybe that's why
my per centage of success at applying certain tiny parts is not that good
when listening to MY music. Maybe I should try something less
strident...like Bohemian chants.

Mike Brock

Any
choral music gets the nod, but Wagner in any form does not. Meredith
Wilson's "Seventy Sick Trombones" is a favorite, as well as just
about any other piece of music from the "Music Man"- not excluding
the hypnotic rythmic chanting of the salesmen in the song "Rock
Island" (yes) riding the cushions into Mason City. Arthur Honegger's
"Pacific 231" probably gets as close as any to true "railroad music"
otherwise.

Music is my constant companion when I am either at the bench or the
layout. At the present I am listening to a lovely Ravel violin sonata
:-) , while a taking a needed break from crawling around on the floor
trying to find in the dark the ONLY remaining lateral running board
grab iron screw eye within a hundred miles >:-o .

Denny
--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento






Yahoo! Groups Links



Manfred Lorenz
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Miller, Andrew S." <asmiller@...>
wrote:

Denny,

Have you ever wondered if 231 was the number of the loco or if
Arthur
Honegger merely misunderstood the European wheel designation of the
Pacific?
I wonder how Honegger should have misunderstood anything? 231 _IS_
the wheel arrangement of a Pacific in France. To my knowledge there
was no such thing as a common European designation at that time.

Look here: Isn't that a nice engine?
http://www.galleriabaumgartner.ch/nord_231.jpg

I find it quite amusing how often wishful thinking is attached to the
name of Honegger's masterpiece. The fellow NP folks tend to attach a
loco number of NP origin to it. The obvious is overlooked often.

Sorry no freight car content! But at least the era is right.

How often would a fast passenger engine be used to haul freight
trains?

Manfred


gary laakso
 

I would have thought the "anvil chorus" was the perfect music ! I listen to it for all framework. Yes, i am working on the reefer as a WFEX from the hands-on session.

----- Original Message -----
From:
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: 8/15/2007 11:08:19 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Freight Car Music


I have not listened to music in over 30 years. Talk Radio is the answer.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@comcast.net
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left

On Aug 15, 2007, at 10:57 AM, Mike Brock wrote:


Denny Anspach writes:

"Well, my freight car music is on the order of Brahms, Beethoven,
Dvorshak, Grieg, and Puccini; and is unlikely ever to change."

While it is difficult to say that this thread is within scope, it
IS [ I
think ] rather harmless [ thank goodness ]. I mean...we aren't
going to get
into a dispute about music are we? So...I'll offer this. My
favorite music
to listen to while working on resin frt car kits is the soft,
lingering,
melodic sounds of large steam engines working slowly up grade. I
spent the
period 1980-2004 chasing various examples around the US shooting
film and
video and, of course, did many sound recordings. The only real
problem with
my choice of "music" is the occasional time when I'm trying to add a
delicate part...say a door stop...to a box car side when the
engineer of,
say, N&W 2-6-6-4 1218 decided to blow its "hooter" whistle. Maybe
that's why
my per centage of success at applying certain tiny parts is not
that good
when listening to MY music. Maybe I should try something less
strident...like Bohemian chants.

Mike Brock

Any
choral music gets the nod, but Wagner in any form does not. Meredith
Wilson's "Seventy Sick Trombones" is a favorite, as well as just
about any other piece of music from the "Music Man"- not excluding
the hypnotic rythmic chanting of the salesmen in the song "Rock
Island" (yes) riding the cushions into Mason City. Arthur Honegger's
"Pacific 231" probably gets as close as any to true "railroad music"
otherwise.

Music is my constant companion when I am either at the bench or the
layout. At the present I am listening to a lovely Ravel violin sonata
:-) , while a taking a needed break from crawling around on the floor
trying to find in the dark the ONLY remaining lateral running board
grab iron screw eye within a hundred miles >:-o .

Denny
--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento






Yahoo! Groups Links



jaley <jaley@...>
 

On Aug 14, 8:06pm, Denny Anspach wrote:
Subject: [STMFC] Freight Car Music
Music is my constant companion when I am either at the bench or the
layout. At the present I am listening to a lovely Ravel violin sonata

Ah, yes: Ravel. Best known not only for the exotic "Bolero", but also for
the UP CA-1 caboose (long before Walthers did one) and the Superior
Bakery.

An excellent choice!

-Jeff

--
Jeff Aley jaley@pcocd2.intel.com
DPG Chipsets Product Engineering
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533


rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

And here I thought Honegger's was a feed mill on the Wabash which Chet
as switch lists for.
Thanks for the switch list you put in the files yesterday Chet.
Clark Propst


pgrace
 

Andy,

231 is the French axle arrangement for a 4-6-2 pacific...

What about the "Copenhagen Steam Railway Gallop" by Lumbye?

Patrick Grace

----- Original Message -----
From: Miller, Andrew S.
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, August 15, 2007 1:59 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Freight Car Music


Denny,

Have you ever wondered if 231 was the number of the loco or if Arthur
Honegger merely misunderstood the European wheel designation of the
Pacific?

regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
On Behalf Of Denny Anspach

. . .
Arthur Honegger's
"Pacific 231" probably gets as close as any to true "railroad music"
otherwise.


pgrace
 

What about the Copenhagen Stram Railway Gallop by Lumbye?

----- Original Message -----
From: Miller, Andrew S.
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, August 15, 2007 1:59 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Freight Car Music


Denny,

Have you ever wondered if 231 was the number of the loco or if Arthur
Honegger merely misunderstood the European wheel designation of the
Pacific?

regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
On Behalf Of Denny Anspach

. . .
Arthur Honegger's
"Pacific 231" probably gets as close as any to true "railroad music"
otherwise.


rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "P Grace" <pgrace@...> wrote:

What about the Copenhagen Stram Railway Gallop by Lumbye?
You guys...Hank Snow's "I'm movin on" also covered by the Stones live.
Clark Propst


Peter Weiglin
 

...and when/if, I wonder, will our moderator chime in on this topic with the theme song from the old American Airlines "Music 'Til Dawn" program?

You remember the tune? "That's All."

Peter Weiglin
Amelia, OH


Philip Dove <philip.dove@...>
 

In France and some European countries they counted axles not wheels 231 is the correct notation for a pacific if your French. To digress even further off freight cars Night mail must be the best poem in a train tempo. The poem was written in the thirties as the sound track for a General post office publicity film showing a mail train running through the night London to Glasgow.
What is a boxcar? (Mandatory freight car content.)
Regards Philip Dove

----- Original Message -----
From: Miller, Andrew S.
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: 15 August 2007 13:59
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Freight Car Music


Denny,

Have you ever wondered if 231 was the number of the loco or if Arthur
Honegger merely misunderstood the European wheel designation of the
Pacific?

regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
On Behalf Of Denny Anspach

. . .
Arthur Honegger's
"Pacific 231" probably gets as close as any to true "railroad music"
otherwise.


Paul Hillman
 

A few years ago Merle Haggard released a great railroad album, "My Love Affair with Trains", all original songs and from the steam era.

Included are songs;

"I won't Give Up My Train", about an engineer,
"My Love Affair with Trains", written by Dolly Parton,
"Where have all the Hobos gone",
"The Miners Silver Ghost",

and many others.

Great STMFC era music.

Anyone heard it besides me?

Paul Hillman


Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

No one has ever topped Jimmy Forest's Night Train, the closest thing to a blues tone poem ever. - Al Westerfield