Amount of products


Charles Hladik
 

KL,
My guess is that the "tread heads" venue is less expensive to rent. I've
not been to either, but it is good practice to stay in the same place year
after year so that everyone knows where to meet.
As for products, a lot of us can't keep up with what's released almost
daily.
Chuck Hladik



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Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: tmolsen@UDel.Edu

Kurt,

The Naperville attendance is close to 400 attendees. As I have not been to Coco Beach, I cannot say.

----- Original Message -----

That's comparable to the annual all-armor modeling show I attend (AMPS 2007, Havre de Grace MD: 130 contestants, 350 walk-ins, 34 vendors with 80 tables). I've mentioned before the differences between armor and freight car modeling in the available products and references (definitely more armor items), and one view was that there were fewer freight car hobbyists than armor modelers. Also, given that the freight car "convention" attracts people willing to pay $90 to $95 just to walk in the door (gadzooks!) while the armor people sometimes balk at $25, I suspect the price threshold for products would be higher too.

My point being, for two modeling hobbies that are known for their rivet counters, I'm surprised that there aren't more things like low-pressure/limited run styrene kits, resin models, resin conversion sets and resin and photo-etch detail sets available for freight cars.

KL


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Kurt Laughlin wrote:
My point being, for two modeling hobbies that are known for their rivet counters, I'm surprised that there aren't more things like low-pressure/limited run styrene kits, resin models, resin conversion sets and resin and photo-etch detail sets available for freight cars.
You're exactly right, Kurt, and you're not the first to say it. But things haven't changed over the years, despite this observation being made regularly. Guess it's an entrenched difference <g>.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Pieter Roos
 

As has been noted before, part of the issue may be in the nature of
the two hobbies. If you leave out the wargamers (who generally only
want the smaller models, and often have seperate sources altogether)
there isn't much to do with the armor modeling hobby once you pass
the research and construction phase. Contests or displays and talking
about the model I guess, but I don't think most armor modelers push
them around the table top or what have you. OTOH, a model railroader
can build and operate a layout and presumably keep reasonably busy
with the hobby without ever adding extra detail to a model (today,
possibly without ever assembling one!).

The really odd point is the growing number of pre-assembled and even
weathered armor and aircraft models. Buy it, put it on the shelf, you
are done (except for dusting occasionally). Now there's a fulfilling
hobby!

As an additonal point, if one looks at the number of resin RR models
available and the number of parts sets from small vendors like Free
State as well as Detail Associates, et al there really is a lot
available. Has anyone ever tried to compare the number of possible
freight car prototypes to the number of (say) armor prototypes? I'd
guess there are more freight cars, although probably not by a
tremendous margin.
Pieter Roos

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Kurt Laughlin wrote:
My point being, for two modeling hobbies that are known for their
rivet counters, I'm surprised that there aren't more things like
low-pressure/limited run styrene kits, resin models, resin
conversion
sets and resin and photo-etch detail sets available for freight
cars.

You're exactly right, Kurt, and you're not the first to say
it. But
things haven't changed over the years, despite this observation
being
made regularly. Guess it's an entrenched difference <g>.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: pieter_roos

As has been noted before, part of the issue may be in the nature of
the two hobbies. If you leave out the wargamers (who generally only
want the smaller models, and often have seperate sources altogether)
there isn't much to do with the armor modeling hobby once you pass
the research and construction phase. Contests or displays and talking
about the model I guess, but I don't think most armor modelers push
them around the table top or what have you. OTOH, a model railroader
can build and operate a layout and presumably keep reasonably busy
with the hobby without ever adding extra detail to a model (today,
possibly without ever assembling one!).

----- Original Message -----

That's why I was limiting my comparision to the folks that would attend a RPM meet. These - you - guys aren't your basic MRR types, but a smaller subset, much as the people who attend AMPS are a smaller subset of military modelers. Neither group is content to build models out of the box or buy them prepainted and weathered, thus they are the natural market for aftermarket and specialty items.

----- Original Message -----
As an additonal point, if one looks at the number of resin RR models
available and the number of parts sets from small vendors like Free
State as well as Detail Associates, et al there really is a lot
available.
----- Original Message -----

I mentioned this before, but there really ain't a lot for MRR compared to armor modeling. For example, one company has just issued their *1000th* photoetch detail set for 1/35 military vehicles. This is in addition to the ~50 "maxi" 1/35 sets, ~100 "mini" 1/35 sets, ~150 1/35 vinyl paint mask sets, and ~ 35 turned metal gun barrels, not mention the sets they've made for 1/72 and 1/48 tanks, 1/144, 1/72, 1/48, 1/35, 1/32, and 1/24 aircraft, and ships. I dare say that this one company has issued more 1/35 model detail items than all the HO RR items combined - and they are but one of dozens of companies, large and small.

----- Original Message -----
Has anyone ever tried to compare the number of possible
freight car prototypes to the number of (say) armor prototypes? I'd
guess there are more freight cars, although probably not by a
tremendous margin.
----- Original Message -----

I would also say that there are many more freight car than armor prototypes, maybe by an order of magnitude, depending on how you slice it. It was the desire to model limited production vehicles and variants that really got the resin industry going 25 years ago. Now, you have a number of first quality injection molded kits of tanks that had production runs of 12, six, three, or even a single vehicle. (An somewhat on-topic aside: A kit was issued earlier this year of a truly massive German railway gun that ran on a double set of tracks. Only one real gun was made, but you can buy a kit of it in 1/35 scale for ~$800. The kit weighs about *forty* pounds.)

KL


Pieter Roos
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Kurt Laughlin" <fleeta@...> wrote:

Hi Kurt;

I'm thinking more along the lines that even armor modelers who don't
go to meets are more into model building and adding detail (since
there is much else to do with the hobby). Put another way, possibly a
higher proportion of the "prototype modelers" in railroading go to the
meetings than among armor modelers.

Another thought is the tanks are more analogous to locomotives in
model railroading; the "center piece" of the modeling. In that sense
freight cars would be more like models of softskin vehicles, which I
suspect are underrepresented in the armor modeling arena (or used to
be when I was into tanks).

<Snip>

I would also say that there are many more freight car than armor
prototypes,
maybe by an order of magnitude, depending on how you slice it. It
was the
desire to model limited production vehicles and variants that really
got the
resin industry going 25 years ago. Now, you have a number of first
quality
injection molded kits of tanks that had production runs of 12, six,
three,
or even a single vehicle. (An somewhat on-topic aside: A kit was
issued
earlier this year of a truly massive German railway gun that ran on
a double
set of tracks. Only one real gun was made, but you can buy a kit of
it in
1/35 scale for ~$800. The kit weighs about *forty* pounds.)
Ahh, Dora, but she had a "bother" "Schwere Gustav" so there were two
completed. I see you can also buy an after-market aluminum barrel for
a mere $495!

http://www.modelers-paradise.com/dora35/dorarailwaygun35.htm

Pieter Roos


KL


Philip Dove <philip.dove@...>
 

Pieter
If you compare like with like then there are a tremendous amount more freight cars than armoured vehicles. On the other hand most Armour modellers make models of prototypes from around the world. Most Freight car modellers make models of the cars of one or two countries. EG Canada and the USA.
Regards PhilipDove


From: pieter_roos
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: 10 September 2007 01:31
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Amount of products


............................ Has anyone ever tried to compare the number of possible
freight car prototypes to the number of (say) armor prototypes? I'd
guess there are more freight cars, although probably not by a
tremendous margin.
Pieter Roos