glass cullet in hoppers, out of era.


Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...>
 

Russ didn't seem to make this clear, but you shouldn't be moving crushed glass in happers until after glass recycling got to large enough volumes, way out of the era of this list. I can tell you where it's shipped in New England - ask the question on the OPSIG list.


Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478


Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...> wrote:

Russ didn't seem to make this clear, but you shouldn't be moving
crushed glass in happers until after glass recycling got to large
enough volumes, way out of the era of this list. I can tell you where
it's shipped in New England - ask the question on the OPSIG list.

That would be "post-consumer" recycling. The cullet being loaded at
breweries is "industrial" scrap, from breakage, chipped necks and the
like, and would be all one type of glass that could go directly back
to the bottle manufacture for re-use. I'm sure returning cullet from
the bottling plant long pre-dates post-consumer recycling.

Dennis


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Dennis Storzek wrote:
That would be "post-consumer" recycling. The cullet being loaded at breweries is "industrial" scrap, from breakage, chipped necks and the like, and would be all one type of glass that could go directly back to the bottle manufacture for re-use. I'm sure returning cullet from the bottling plant long pre-dates post-consumer recycling.
Dennis is entirely right, and the same goes for in-plant steel scrap, aluminum, etc. etc. for all kinds of manufacturing. Nowadays people often mean "post-consumer" when they say "recycling" but the kind described here certainly goes back to the 19th century and quite possibly back before the Industrial Revolution.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


James Eckman
 

One reason that bottle plants generate cullet is that if a SINGLE bottle is found with a defect called a bird's swing, the entire batch of bottles is rejected and smashed on the spot, even if there are 1,000s in that batch. When the bottles are filled, this defect leaves tiny shards of glass in the bottle. Very nasty to say the least. Also hangups in the line can quickly destroy 100 or more bottles in a very short period of time. These happen fairly often. The technology hasn't changed much since the 40's from what I understand except for inspection and threaded caps.

Jim Eckman
Former designer of bottle inspection equipment