The location of the mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota


lnbill <bwelch@...>
 

Many questions arose during my presention on the FGE/WFE/BRE fleet
about where the heck is Hamlin, Minnesota. In exploring the documents
I copied just a few days earlier in Saint Paul, Hamlin was actually
the name of the Western Fruit shops in Saint Paul. Hopefully many of
you in attendence are also on this list. If the Dick brothers are not
on this list, can someone pass this info on to them.

Bill Welch


Russ Strodtz <railfreightcars@...>
 

Bill,

There is a major street in St Paul called "Hamline Avenue". That may be where
this usage came from. I will agree that there is no such place as "Hamlin MN".

The WFE car shop in St Paul was called "Jackson Street Shops". Think the buildings
are now gone. After WFE vacated them they were owned by a car scrapper that also
dabbled a little in locomotive re-sales.

On a map if you follow the GN/NP up from 7th Street the GN splits and goes straight
West at Westminster St. The NP coninues North for a little ways before heading
West. The WFE shop was on the GN line just West of where it goes under I35E.

Their main shop remains today at Hillyard WA. They do occasionaly bid on work.
Overhauled a lot of BN waycars during the 80's and early 90's.

Russ

----- Original Message -----
From: lnbill
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, 01 November, 2007 09:31
Subject: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota


Many questions arose during my presention on the FGE/WFE/BRE fleet
about where the heck is Hamlin, Minnesota. In exploring the documents
I copied just a few days earlier in Saint Paul, Hamlin was actually
the name of the Western Fruit shops in Saint Paul. Hopefully many of
you in attendence are also on this list. If the Dick brothers are not
on this list, can someone pass this info on to them.

Bill Welch




Yahoo! Groups Links


Stokes John
 

Au contraire, there is a hamlet in Minnesota named Hamlin. See below. There is also a Hamline (with an "e") University in St. Paul, with quite a famous choir, and at one time a well known basketball team.

Hamlin is a township in Lac qui Parle County, Minnesota.
The latitude of Hamlin is 44.943N. The longitude is -96.175W.
It is in the Central Standard time zone. Elevation is 1,093 feet.

The population, at the time of the 2000 census, was 185.
John Stokes
Bellevue, WA


To: STMFC@...: railfreightcars@...: Thu, 1 Nov 2007 11:23:15 -0500Subject: Re: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota

Bill,There is a major street in St Paul called "Hamline Avenue". That may be wherethis usage came from. I will agree that there is no such place as "Hamlin MN".The WFE car shop in St Paul was called "Jackson Street Shops". Think the buildingsare now gone. After WFE vacated them they were owned by a car scrapper that alsodabbled a little in locomotive re-sales.On a map if you follow the GN/NP up from 7th Street the GN splits and goes straightWest at Westminster St. The NP coninues North for a little ways before headingWest. The WFE shop was on the GN line just West of where it goes under I35E.Their main shop remains today at Hillyard WA. They do occasionaly bid on work.Overhauled a lot of BN waycars during the 80's and early 90's.Russ----- Original Message ----- From: lnbill To: STMFC@... Sent: Thursday, 01 November, 2007 09:31Subject: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin, MinnesotaMany questions arose during my presention on the FGE/WFE/BRE fleet about where the heck is Hamlin, Minnesota. In exploring the documents I copied just a few days earlier in Saint Paul, Hamlin was actually the name of the Western Fruit shops in Saint Paul. Hopefully many of you in attendence are also on this list. If the Dick brothers are not on this list, can someone pass this info on to them.Bill WelchYahoo! Groups Links


Michael Mang <mnmang@...>
 

Bill,



I enjoyed your talk at Naperville. I'm not a GN expert, but I found on an
old map of the Twin Cities a GN yard (near Hamline University) called
"Hamline Transfer". There is a Koppers Coke, and some other unlabeled
trackage on the map just south and a little west of the NP's Como Shops.



There is also a GN Engineer's contract here:
http://www.jaysworks.com/1637/agree/gnhog.html that says "Transfer
assignments, as now constituted, include such service between the following
points:

Saint Paul: Between Como Yard or points East of Como Yard and Hamline, W. F.
E. Shop Yard, Koppers Coke, or Fair Grounds, or points West thereof." Since
these points are all in very close proximity, I would believe that the WFE
cars weighed at Hamlin(e) are being weighed in this vicinity.



Michael Mang

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
lnbill
Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 9:32 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota



Many questions arose during my presention on the FGE/WFE/BRE fleet
about where the heck is Hamlin, Minnesota. In exploring the documents
I copied just a few days earlier in Saint Paul, Hamlin was actually
the name of the Western Fruit shops in Saint Paul. Hopefully many of
you in attendence are also on this list. If the Dick brothers are not
on this list, can someone pass this info on to them.

Bill Welch


William Bryk <wmbryk@...>
 

Hannibal Hamlin was Abraham Lincoln's first vice president. A former
Senator from Maine, he returned to the Senate after his retirement from the
vice presidency. Given Minnesota's enthusiastic support for the war effort,
it stands to reason that some settlement may have named itself for him
before it faded into obscurity. I don't think there's a relationship
between Hamlin and Hamline. Remember, St. Paul was once named Pig's Eye
before the respectable element took over, and I believe there's a GN yard
that bore that name into modern times.

Regards,
William Bryk

On 11/1/07, Michael Mang <mnmang@...> wrote:

Bill,

I enjoyed your talk at Naperville. I'm not a GN expert, but I found on an
old map of the Twin Cities a GN yard (near Hamline University) called
"Hamline Transfer". There is a Koppers Coke, and some other unlabeled
trackage on the map just south and a little west of the NP's Como Shops.

There is also a GN Engineer's contract here:
http://www.jaysworks.com/1637/agree/gnhog.html that says "Transfer
assignments, as now constituted, include such service between the
following
points:

Saint Paul: Between Como Yard or points East of Como Yard and Hamline, W.
F.
E. Shop Yard, Koppers Coke, or Fair Grounds, or points West thereof."
Since
these points are all in very close proximity, I would believe that the WFE
cars weighed at Hamlin(e) are being weighed in this vicinity.

Michael Mang

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... <STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:
STMFC@... <STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf Of
lnbill
Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 9:32 AM
To: STMFC@... <STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota

Many questions arose during my presention on the FGE/WFE/BRE fleet
about where the heck is Hamlin, Minnesota. In exploring the documents
I copied just a few days earlier in Saint Paul, Hamlin was actually
the name of the Western Fruit shops in Saint Paul. Hopefully many of
you in attendence are also on this list. If the Dick brothers are not
on this list, can someone pass this info on to them.

Bill Welch





Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

William Bryk wrote:
Given Minnesota's enthusiastic support for the war effort, it stands to reason that some settlement may have named itself for him before it faded into obscurity. I don't think there's a relationship between Hamlin and Hamline.
But to have WFE shops and a reweigh location at a hamlet of 185 persons beggars belief.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Stokes John
 

From the information on Wikipedia and other sites in a Google search, Hamlin was obviously larger at one time. It is in the Southwest part of Minnesota on the border, and Madison, Minnesota is the main town and county seat. I did not find out whether this is on the main line of the Great Northern, however. Nevertheless, it is a real town and still existed in 2000, and from some indications still does, but times have changed as we all know.

John S


To: STMFC@...: thompson@...: Thu, 1 Nov 2007 10:32:41 -0700Subject: Re: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota




William Bryk wrote:> Given Minnesota's enthusiastic support for the war effort, it stands > to reason that some settlement may have named itself for him before it > faded into obscurity. I don't think there's a relationship between > Hamlin and Hamline.But to have WFE shops and a reweigh location at a hamlet of 185 persons beggars belief.Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@... of books on railroad history


Michael Mang <mnmang@...>
 

My hypothesis remains that the proximity of the WFE car shops to Hamline
Transfer yard, in bustling St. Paul, Minnesota, gives the name of the
re-weight station Bill described in his presentation. I believe this to more
probable than decidedly bucolic Hamlin. Bill showed numerous photos or cars
re-weighed at Hamlin(e), again suggesting that this was a busier than
average place.



Michael Mang

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of John
Stokes
Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 1:06 PM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota



From the information on Wikipedia and other sites in a Google search, Hamlin
was obviously larger at one time. It is in the Southwest part of Minnesota
on the border, and Madison, Minnesota is the main town and county seat. I
did not find out whether this is on the main line of the Great Northern,
however. Nevertheless, it is a real town and still existed in 2000, and from
some indications still does, but times have changed as we all know.

John S

To: STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.comFrom> comFrom:
thompson@signaturep <mailto:thompson%40signaturepress.comDate> ress.comDate:
Thu, 1 Nov 2007 10:32:41 -0700Subject: Re: [STMFC] The location of the
mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota

William Bryk wrote:> Given Minnesota's enthusiastic support for the war
effort, it stands > to reason that some settlement may have named itself for
him before it > faded into obscurity. I don't think there's a relationship
between > Hamlin and Hamline.But to have WFE shops and a reweigh location at
a hamlet of 185 persons beggars belief.Tony Thompson Editor, Signature
Press, Berkeley, CA2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705
www.signaturepress.com(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail,
thompson@signaturep <mailto:thompson%40signaturepress.comPublishers>
ress.comPublishers of books on railroad history


Tim O'Connor
 

From what I can find out Madison was located on the M&StL not the GN. Didn't
someone say the "Hamlin shop" was in South St Paul?

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: John Stokes <ggstokes@...>
From the information on Wikipedia and other sites in a Google search, Hamlin was
obviously larger at one time. It is in the Southwest part of Minnesota on the
border, and Madison, Minnesota is the main town and county seat. I did not find
out whether this is on the main line of the Great Northern, however.
Nevertheless, it is a real town and still existed in 2000, and from some
indications still does, but times have changed as we all know.

John S

To: STMFC@...: thompson@...: Thu, 1 Nov 2007
10:32:41 -0700Subject: Re: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin,
Minnesota

William Bryk wrote:> Given Minnesota's enthusiastic support for the war effort,
it stands > to reason that some settlement may have named itself for him before
it > faded into obscurity. I don't think there's a relationship between > Hamlin
and Hamline.But to have WFE shops and a reweigh location at a hamlet of 185
persons beggars belief.Tony Thompson


Thomas Baker
 

I don't remember the GN as having a yard by the name of Pig's Eye, but the Milwaukee certainly did, and my father-in-law worked the Midnight to eight shift there for many years.

Tom

________________________________

From: STMFC@... on behalf of William Bryk
Sent: Thu 11/1/2007 1:28 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota



Hannibal Hamlin was Abraham Lincoln's first vice president. A former
Senator from Maine, he returned to the Senate after his retirement from the
vice presidency. Given Minnesota's enthusiastic support for the war effort,
it stands to reason that some settlement may have named itself for him
before it faded into obscurity. I don't think there's a relationship
between Hamlin and Hamline. Remember, St. Paul was once named Pig's Eye
before the respectable element took over, and I believe there's a GN yard
that bore that name into modern times.

Regards,
William Bryk


On 11/1/07, Michael Mang <mnmang@...> wrote:

Bill,

I enjoyed your talk at Naperville. I'm not a GN expert, but I found on an
old map of the Twin Cities a GN yard (near Hamline University) called
"Hamline Transfer". There is a Koppers Coke, and some other unlabeled
trackage on the map just south and a little west of the NP's Como Shops.

There is also a GN Engineer's contract here:
http://www.jaysworks.com/1637/agree/gnhog.html that says "Transfer
assignments, as now constituted, include such service between the
following
points:

Saint Paul: Between Como Yard or points East of Como Yard and Hamline, W.
F.
E. Shop Yard, Koppers Coke, or Fair Grounds, or points West thereof."
Since
these points are all in very close proximity, I would believe that the WFE
cars weighed at Hamlin(e) are being weighed in this vicinity.

Michael Mang

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... <STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:
STMFC@... <STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf Of
lnbill
Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 9:32 AM
To: STMFC@... <STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota

Many questions arose during my presention on the FGE/WFE/BRE fleet
about where the heck is Hamlin, Minnesota. In exploring the documents
I copied just a few days earlier in Saint Paul, Hamlin was actually
the name of the Western Fruit shops in Saint Paul. Hopefully many of
you in attendence are also on this list. If the Dick brothers are not
on this list, can someone pass this info on to them.

Bill Welch










Yahoo! Groups Links


Stokes John
 

Is it possible that the e was inadvertently dropped in some reference to the re-weigh station that Bill mentioned? Hamline University, or College during the heyday of the WFE, was a well know local landmark and institution and it would seem odd that the railroad would get the spelling wrong.

Has anybody had the time to check with the folks at the Great Northern Historical Society to perhaps get some more accurate data? But the original supposition that Hamline was a non-existent town in Minnesota has been proved inaccurate, whether or not it was the site of the aforesaid re-weigh station is the open question.

John S.


To: STMFC@...: mnmang@...: Thu, 1 Nov 2007 13:39:50 -0500Subject: RE: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota

My hypothesis remains that the proximity of the WFE car shops to HamlineTransfer yard, in bustling St. Paul, Minnesota, gives the name of there-weight station Bill described in his presentation. I believe this to moreprobable than decidedly bucolic Hamlin. Bill showed numerous photos or carsre-weighed at Hamlin(e), again suggesting that this was a busier thanaverage place.Michael Mang-----Original Message-----From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of JohnStokesSent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 1:06 PMTo: stmfc@...: RE: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin, MinnesotaFrom the information on Wikipedia and other sites in a Google search, Hamlinwas obviously larger at one time. It is in the Southwest part of Minnesotaon the border, and Madison, Minnesota is the main town and county seat. Idid not find out whether this is on the main line of the Great Northern,however. Nevertheless, it is a real town and still existed in 2000, and fromsome indications still does, but times have changed as we all know.John STo: STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.comFrom> comFrom:thompson@signaturep <mailto:thompson%40signaturepress.comDate> ress.comDate:Thu, 1 Nov 2007 10:32:41 -0700Subject: Re: [STMFC] The location of themysterious Hamlin, MinnesotaWilliam Bryk wrote:> Given Minnesota's enthusiastic support for the wareffort, it stands > to reason that some settlement may have named itself forhim before it > faded into obscurity. I don't think there's a relationshipbetween > Hamlin and Hamline.But to have WFE shops and a reweigh location ata hamlet of 185 persons beggars belief.Tony Thompson Editor, SignaturePress, Berkeley, CA2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705www.signaturepress.com(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail,thompson@signaturep <mailto:thompson%40signaturepress.comPublishers>ress.comPublishers of books on railroad history


Stokes John
 

That appears to be correct. Further research via the internet reveals that there is a Hamlin-Midway Neighborhood on St. Paul's South East side, near the major streets of Wabash and Kellogg, near the River. There is also a Hamlin (no e) Street in the vicinity. So the probability is that this ares was the location of the shops in question.

John S.


To: STMFC@...: timboconnor@...: Thu, 1 Nov 2007 18:48:36 +0000Subject: RE: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota

From what I can find out Madison was located on the M&StL not the GN. Didn'tsomeone say the "Hamlin shop" was in South St Paul?-------------- Original message ----------------------From: John Stokes <ggstokes@...>> From the information on Wikipedia and other sites in a Google search, Hamlin was > obviously larger at one time. It is in the Southwest part of Minnesota on the > border, and Madison, Minnesota is the main town and county seat. I did not find > out whether this is on the main line of the Great Northern, however. > Nevertheless, it is a real town and still existed in 2000, and from some > indications still does, but times have changed as we all know.> > John S> > To: STMFC@...: thompson@...: Thu, 1 Nov 2007 > 10:32:41 -0700Subject: Re: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin, > Minnesota> > William Bryk wrote:> Given Minnesota's enthusiastic support for the war effort, > it stands > to reason that some settlement may have named itself for him before > it > faded into obscurity. I don't think there's a relationship between > Hamlin > and Hamline.But to have WFE shops and a reweigh location at a hamlet of 185 > persons beggars belief.Tony Thompson


Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

Bill, already pointed out Hamlin was actually the name of the Western Fruit
shops in Saint Paul in his original email. This continued discussion moot
and quite funny actually as it shows how threads can take on a life of their
own at times.

Brian Carlson


al_brown03
 

Topo maps (topozone.com) don't show Hamlin, Lac qui Parle County, as
a station on any railroad: the nearest is the M&StL line from
Winthrop (Minn.) to Watertown (S.Dak.) and points west, which passes
through Dawson. The August 1936 Official Guide doesn't show Hamlin
either. It *does* show Hamline Transfer as a station on the GN; since
we're looking for a WFEX shop, I'll put my money there.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@..., John Stokes <ggstokes@...> wrote:

That appears to be correct. Further research via the internet
reveals that there is a Hamlin-Midway Neighborhood on St. Paul's
South East side, near the major streets of Wabash and Kellogg, near
the River. There is also a Hamlin (no e) Street in the vicinity. So
the probability is that this ares was the location of the shops in
question.

John S.


To: STMFC@...: timboconnor@...: Thu, 1 Nov 2007 18:48:36
+0000Subject: RE: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin,
Minnesota




From what I can find out Madison was located on the M&StL not the
GN. Didn'tsomeone say the "Hamlin shop" was in South St Paul?---------
----- Original message ----------------------From: John Stokes
<ggstokes@...>> From the information on Wikipedia and other sites in
a Google search, Hamlin was > obviously larger at one time. It is in
the Southwest part of Minnesota on the > border, and Madison,
Minnesota is the main town and county seat. I did not find > out
whether this is on the main line of the Great Northern, however. >
Nevertheless, it is a real town and still existed in 2000, and from
some > indications still does, but times have changed as we all
know.> > John S> > To: STMFC@...: thompson@...: Thu, 1 Nov 2007 >
10:32:41 -0700Subject: Re: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious
Hamlin, > Minnesota> > William Bryk wrote:> Given Minnesota's
enthusiastic support for the war effort, > it stands > to reason that
some settlement may have named itself for him before > it > faded
into obscurity. I don't think there's a relationship between > Hamlin
and Hamline.But to have WFE shops and a reweigh location at a
hamlet of 185 > persons beggars belief.Tony Thompson







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@..., "al_brown03" <abrown@...> wrote:

Topo maps (topozone.com) don't show Hamlin, Lac qui Parle County, as
a station on any railroad: the nearest is the M&StL line from
Winthrop (Minn.) to Watertown (S.Dak.) and points west, which passes
through Dawson. The August 1936 Official Guide doesn't show Hamlin
either. It *does* show Hamline Transfer as a station on the GN; since
we're looking for a WFEX shop, I'll put my money there.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.
Actually, we're looking for the scale where the WFEX shop re-weighed
their cars. It very likely didn't have the same place name as the
shop, but rather was named for the GN station it was located at.

Very similar to Soo Line cars repaired at Shoreham, also in
Minneapolis; those cars were all stenciled WS, for West Shoreham, the
name in the time table of the location where the scale actually was.

Dennis


Richard Remiarz
 

Being from Minnesota, I was one of the people that asked Bill about the location of Hamlin at Naperville. I promised Bill to check my GN station lists when I got home. I just looked through my copies of the Great Northern Railway Official List of Officers, Agents, and Stations for 1956, 1963, and 1969. There is no station called Hamlin or Hamline listed in any of the booklets. The back of the 1956 book list stations abandoned since 1930, and there is no Hamlin or Hamline listed there either. The books also list the locations of all scales on the GN, both railroad and industry owned. There are 3 scales listed in St. Paul in these books. Two are industries (Capital Milling and Minnesota Ry-Products Co.) The third scale is railroad owned with its location listed as St. Paul-Como Ave. This would be near Hamline Avenue, and fit with Michael Mang's previous comments copied below. Unfortunately, I don't know what the symbol was for this scale. A 1927 list of scales on the GN doesn't list this scale, but do list scales at railroad shops at Dale St. and Jackson St.

Sincerely,

Rich Remiarz
Vadnais Heights, MN (just North of St. Paul)

P.S. Bill, thanks for the excellent job on both clinics.

I enjoyed your talk at Naperville. I'm not a GN expert, but I found on an
old map of the Twin Cities a GN yard (near Hamline University) called
"Hamline Transfer". There is a Koppers Coke, and some other unlabeled
trackage on the map just south and a little west of the NP's Como Shops.



There is also a GN Engineer's contract here:
http://www.jaysworks.com/1637/agree/gnhog.html<http://www.jaysworks.com/1637/agree/gnhog.html> that says "Transfer
assignments, as now constituted, include such service between the following
points:

Saint Paul: Between Como Yard or points East of Como Yard and Hamline, W. F.
E. Shop Yard, Koppers Coke, or Fair Grounds, or points West thereof." Since
these points are all in very close proximity, I would believe that the WFE
cars weighed at Hamlin(e) are being weighed in this vicinity.

Michael Mang


briankd.usf.net@...
 

Thank you for the information Bill and Russ. I have an older GN map that shows the former Hamline yard in the current location of the BNSF intermodal teminal just east of the main Minnesta Transfer yard. I will be at the Jackson St. Roundhouse (Minnesota Transportation Museum) on Sat. for a NPRHA local meet and if any of the GN folks are there I will bring up your and Russ's comments. Brian Dick. Currently living in the Hamline-Midway neighborhood on St. Paul's west side.

----- Original Message -----
From: "lnbill" <bwelch@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 9:35 AM
Subject: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota


Many questions arose during my presention on the FGE/WFE/BRE fleet
about where the heck is Hamlin, Minnesota. In exploring the documents
I copied just a few days earlier in Saint Paul, Hamlin was actually
the name of the Western Fruit shops in Saint Paul. Hopefully many of
you in attendence are also on this list. If the Dick brothers are not
on this list, can someone pass this info on to them.

Bill Welch




Yahoo! Groups Links




--- http://USFamily.Net/dialup.html - $8.25/mo! -- http://www.usfamily.net/dsl.html - $19.99/mo! ---


Stokes John
 

So maybe the reference in the first place should have been to the HamlinE re-weigh station or transfer, unless Bill has a written reference that says Hamlin. Which is possible. But then we would not have found out that there is really a Hamlin, Minnesota, in M&SL territory, and that the Hamline Transfer, where presumably the WFE facility was, is in South East St. Paul. I still think that the GNHS may have some definitive information on this, and maybe some photographs, or maybe some historical collection in the Twin Cities may have the answer. Interesting trivia.

John S.


To: STMFC@...: rremiarz@...: Thu, 1 Nov 2007 20:25:51 -0500Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: The location of the mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota




Being from Minnesota, I was one of the people that asked Bill about the location of Hamlin at Naperville. I promised Bill to check my GN station lists when I got home. I just looked through my copies of the Great Northern Railway Official List of Officers, Agents, and Stations for 1956, 1963, and 1969. There is no station called Hamlin or Hamline listed in any of the booklets. The back of the 1956 book list stations abandoned since 1930, and there is no Hamlin or Hamline listed there either. The books also list the locations of all scales on the GN, both railroad and industry owned. There are 3 scales listed in St. Paul in these books. Two are industries (Capital Milling and Minnesota Ry-Products Co.) The third scale is railroad owned with its location listed as St. Paul-Como Ave. This would be near Hamline Avenue, and fit with Michael Mang's previous comments copied below. Unfortunately, I don't know what the symbol was for this scale. A 1927 list of scales on the GN doesn't list this scale, but do list scales at railroad shops at Dale St. and Jackson St.Sincerely,Rich RemiarzVadnais Heights, MN (just North of St. Paul)P.S. Bill, thanks for the excellent job on both clinics. I enjoyed your talk at Naperville. I'm not a GN expert, but I found on anold map of the Twin Cities a GN yard (near Hamline University) called"Hamline Transfer". There is a Koppers Coke, and some other unlabeledtrackage on the map just south and a little west of the NP's Como Shops.There is also a GN Engineer's contract here:http://www.jaysworks.com/1637/agree/gnhog.html<http://www.jaysworks.com/1637/agree/gnhog.html> that says "Transferassignments, as now constituted, include such service between the followingpoints: Saint Paul: Between Como Yard or points East of Como Yard and Hamline, W. F.E. Shop Yard, Koppers Coke, or Fair Grounds, or points West thereof." Sincethese points are all in very close proximity, I would believe that the WFEcars weighed at Hamlin(e) are being weighed in this vicinity.Michael Mang


Stokes John
 

Sorry, Brian, if I misplaced the Hamline-Midway neighborhood on the SE side of St. Paul. That is where it seemed to be on the map, but I didn't have a full city map. Hope you have luck in getting some answers, and have a great time at the NPRHA meet. I'm a long time member of both societies, out here at the Western end of the GN and NP Empires.

John S.


To: STMFC@...: briankd.usf.net@...: Thu, 1 Nov 2007 23:26:06 -0500Subject: Re: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota

Thank you for the information Bill and Russ. I have an older GN map that shows the former Hamline yard in the current location of the BNSF intermodal teminal just east of the main Minnesta Transfer yard. I will be at the Jackson St. Roundhouse (Minnesota Transportation Museum) on Sat. for a NPRHA local meet and if any of the GN folks are there I will bring up your and Russ's comments. Brian Dick. Currently living in the Hamline-Midway neighborhood on St. Paul's west side.----- Original Message ----- From: "lnbill" <bwelch@...>To: <STMFC@...>Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 9:35 AMSubject: [STMFC] The location of the mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota> Many questions arose during my presention on the FGE/WFE/BRE fleet> about where the heck is Hamlin, Minnesota. In exploring the documents> I copied just a few days earlier in Saint Paul, Hamlin was actually> the name of the Western Fruit shops in Saint Paul. Hopefully many of> you in attendence are also on this list. If the Dick brothers are not> on this list, can someone pass this info on to them.>> Bill Welch>>>>> Yahoo! Groups Links>>>--- http://USFamily.Net/dialup.html - $8.25/mo! -- http://www.usfamily.net/dsl.html - $19.99/mo! ---


Russ Strodtz <railfreightcars@...>
 

I did not even know this thread was about reweigh locations or I would have
kept my mouth shut. Richard has at least agreed that there was a shop at
Jackson Street.

Russ

----- Original Message -----
From: RICHARD REMIARZ
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, 01 November, 2007 20:25
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: The location of the mysterious Hamlin, Minnesota


Being from Minnesota, I was one of the people that asked Bill about the location of Hamlin at Naperville. I promised Bill to check my GN station lists when I got home. I just looked through my copies of the Great Northern Railway Official List of Officers, Agents, and Stations for 1956, 1963, and 1969. There is no station called Hamlin or Hamline listed in any of the booklets. The back of the 1956 book list stations abandoned since 1930, and there is no Hamlin or Hamline listed there either. The books also list the locations of all scales on the GN, both railroad and industry owned. There are 3 scales listed in St. Paul in these books. Two are industries (Capital Milling and Minnesota Ry-Products Co.) The third scale is railroad owned with its location listed as St. Paul-Como Ave. This would be near Hamline Avenue, and fit with Michael Mang's previous comments copied below. Unfortunately, I don't know what the symbol was for this scale. A 1927 list of scales on the GN doesn't list this scale, but do list scales at railroad shops at Dale St. and Jackson St.

Sincerely,

Rich Remiarz
Vadnais Heights, MN (just North of St. Paul)