Making Model parts through Rapid Prototyping, was "Gloss coat for decalling"


bdg1210 <Bruce_Griffin@...>
 

Group members,

Based on this and other comments about the current issue of Fine
Scale Modeler I purchased a copy to learn about using Future for a
gloss decaling finish. What I found more intersting was an article
about developing parts using CAD and online 3D printing to get the
part delievered to your door. It appears expensive, but a great
chance to get that one part you need. Has anyone used a similar
process to get steam era freight car parts developed?

Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin
Summerfield, NC

--- In STMFC@..., Jack Burgess <jack@...> wrote:

The current issue of Finescale Modeler has an insert on air-
brushing of
acrylic paints (but I will still stick with Floquil) and an article
on
the use of Future. In reading past articles in Finescale Modeler,
it
seems that Future is the primary choice for plane, automobile, etc.
modelers. I haven't used it yet in an airbrush but have brush
painted it
on just portions of wood models to allow for decaling and it worked
just
fine. I'm sure that it won't hurt the Floquil. You need to be
careful
only if applying a heavy coat of a lacquer-based paint (such as
Floquil)
over an enamel or water-based paint...

Jack Burgess
yosemitevalleyrr.com


Jeff English
 

Bruce,

Commercial models are available made using the rapid prototyping
technique. The outfit is called Smoky Mountain Model Works and is
run by Jim King. Jim was making O-scale models but was unhappy with
the degree of support from the O-scale community and switched over to
S-scale about a year ago. He has also made some HO products under
contract to others; the one that comes to mind is a SOU gondola
(which was also the prototype of his first S-scale product)

Tom Madden gave a clinic at Naperville a couple of years ago. While
RP is slick, there is a huge learning curve to making good models
using this technique, and at this point only somebody whose job gives
them access to the equipment (as Jim King has) can economically use
it for making models.

Hope this helps -

Jeff English
Troy, New York

--- In STMFC@..., "bdg1210" <Bruce_Griffin@...> wrote:

Group members,

Based on this and other comments about the current issue of Fine
Scale Modeler I purchased a copy to learn about using Future for a
gloss decaling finish. What I found more intersting was an article
about developing parts using CAD and online 3D printing to get the
part delievered to your door. It appears expensive, but a great
chance to get that one part you need. Has anyone used a similar
process to get steam era freight car parts developed?

Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin
Summerfield, NC

--- In STMFC@..., Jack Burgess <jack@> wrote:

The current issue of Finescale Modeler has an insert on air-
brushing of
acrylic paints (but I will still stick with Floquil) and an
article
on
the use of Future. In reading past articles in Finescale Modeler,
it
seems that Future is the primary choice for plane, automobile,
etc.
modelers. I haven't used it yet in an airbrush but have brush
painted it
on just portions of wood models to allow for decaling and it
worked
just
fine. I'm sure that it won't hurt the Floquil. You need to be
careful
only if applying a heavy coat of a lacquer-based paint (such as
Floquil)
over an enamel or water-based paint...

Jack Burgess
yosemitevalleyrr.com


Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Jeff wrote >
Commercial models are available made using the rapid prototyping technique. The outfit is called Smoky Mountain Model Works and is run by Jim King. Jim was making O-scale models but was unhappy with the degree of support from the O-scale community and switched over to S-scale about a year ago. He has also made some HO products under contract to others; the one that comes to mind is a SOU gondola (which was also the prototype of his first S-scale product)
Tom Madden gave a clinic at Naperville a couple of years ago. While RP is slick, there is a huge learning curve to making good models using this technique, and at this point only somebody whose job gives them access to the equipment (as Jim King has) can economically use it for making models.
The article that Bruce referred to makes this particular type of RP accessible to the average modeler. There is a need to "draft" the part in 3-D but the rest of the work can be out-sourced. While the resulting part sounds expensive ($25 for a air compressor in 1/32 scale as I recall....I don't have access to the article right now), it would be worthwhile if the resulting RP part can then used as a master for casting duplicates in resin. The only question that I have is whether or not the parts are as "clean" as an equivalent scratchbuilt part. I plan to give it a try...

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


destron@...
 

I've seen it used for making bridge piers; I don't know if there had been
any filing or other cleanup work done to the parts, but they looked very
sharp.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

Jeff wrote >
Commercial models are available made using the rapid prototyping
technique. The outfit is called Smoky Mountain Model Works and is
run by Jim King. Jim was making O-scale models but was unhappy with
the degree of support from the O-scale community and switched over to
S-scale about a year ago. He has also made some HO products under
contract to others; the one that comes to mind is a SOU gondola
(which was also the prototype of his first S-scale product)

Tom Madden gave a clinic at Naperville a couple of years ago. While
RP is slick, there is a huge learning curve to making good models
using this technique, and at this point only somebody whose job gives
them access to the equipment (as Jim King has) can economically use
it for making models.
The article that Bruce referred to makes this particular type of RP
accessible to the average modeler. There is a need to "draft" the part
in 3-D but the rest of the work can be out-sourced. While the resulting
part sounds expensive ($25 for a air compressor in 1/32 scale as I
recall....I don't have access to the article right now), it would be
worthwhile if the resulting RP part can then used as a master for
casting duplicates in resin. The only question that I have is whether or
not the parts are as "clean" as an equivalent scratchbuilt part. I plan
to give it a try...

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com






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Charlie Vlk
 

There certainly are major learning curve issues in both the 3D Modeling and Rapid Prototyping end of creating parts or entire
body shells.
Even in HO some degree of "toy train designer" must be included in order for the parts to "read" properly.... no point in rendering
something to exact scale if a layer of paint is going to obscure it.
There are four or more different processes for making RP parts and only two of them that we've used so far are satisfactory for
Z, N and HO sized parts.
Most tooling for commercial models is now being done in 3D although the use of RP is rather limited because of the costs involved.
3D design drawings allow viewing almost photo realistic renderings of the parts and assemblies besides generating interference
checks and sectional views for engineering analysis of designs prior to cutting tooling. Having checked 2D Shop Drawings in a
prior career and 2D Engineering Drawings for Models in my current one, it is much easier to look at 3D models to get an idea what
the finished parts will look like. It is virtually impossible to check how compound curved surfaces will look in 2D but in 3D you get
a good preview if it they are correct before tooling is started.
Charlie Vlk


Rod Miller
 

Pacific Locomotive Works in San Jose, CA

http://www.pacificlocomotive.com/

makes custom parts using the RP process. The web page explains
the process. Of interest is that once a drawing has been made
it can be scaled to any size, thus an O scale driver drawing
is usable in any other scale (ignoring the question of whether
the printing process can replicate things like letters and
numbers in say, Z scale).

The air hose hangar bracket that was a recent thread here might
be an easy but effective place to start.

Rod

bdg1210 wrote:

Group members,
Based on this and other comments about the current issue of Fine Scale Modeler I purchased a copy to learn about using Future for a gloss decaling finish. What I found more intersting was an article about developing parts using CAD and online 3D printing to get the part delievered to your door. It appears expensive, but a great chance to get that one part you need. Has anyone used a similar process to get steam era freight car parts developed?
Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin
Summerfield, NC