Oxygen & Acetylene


eabracher@...
 

Oxy - green and Acet. Red.

eric


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Charles Hladik
 

Gary,
In the 50's Acetelyne tanks were orange, almost a reefer orange, and
Oxygen was and is A sort of Floquil Dark Green. Don't forget that the hoses to
the torch are also those colors, yeah right.
Chuck Hladik



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Gary Roe
 

After a futile attempt to find the answer on the internet, I was hoping someone here could answer a question for me.

If I were to detail a RIP track area on my club's layout (whose era is the late 50's), what color would I paint the Oxygen & Acetylene tanks used in the repair of Steam Era Freight Cars?

Thanks!

gary roe
quincy, illinois


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

gary roe wrote:
If I were to detail a RIP track area on my club's layout (whose era is the late 50's), what color would I paint the Oxygen & Acetylene tanks used in the repair of Steam Era Freight Cars?
Oxygen is always dark green.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Richard Brennan <brennan8@...>
 

At 11:25 12/2/2007, gary roe wrote:
After a futile attempt to find the answer on the internet, I was hoping someone here could answer a question for me.

If I were to detail a RIP track area on my club's layout (whose era is the late 50's), what color would I paint the Oxygen & Acetylene tanks used in the repair of Steam Era Freight Cars?
I thought the tanks were color-coded by owner... not by contents?

Is there a journeyman welder in the house???


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

gary roe wrote:
After a futile attempt to find the answer on the internet, I was hoping someone here could answer a question for me.
If I were to detail a RIP track area on my club's layout (whose era is the late 50's), what color would I paint the Oxygen & Acetylene tanks used in the repair of Steam Era Freight Cars?
Gary, each supplier in the U.S. adopts a consistent color code, but variations DO occur. Usually a flammable gas like hydrogen is red, and traditionally oxygen is green, but without standardization one has to rely on the cylinder label. In Europe, acetylene is maroon, but I have seen brown, red and black acetylene tanks.
If you painted your two tanks red and green, or black and green, no one could object.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


michael bishop <goldrod_1@...>
 

Gary,
I was a diesel mechanic/welder for 20 years. Industrial Oxygen cylinders are a medium to dark green and Acetylene are in a black cylinders tank. There was a label placed on the tank which ID the item. Acetylene tanks look different than Oxygen tanks, they had like a crown around the top.
Michael

gary roe <wabashrr@...> wrote:
After a futile attempt to find the answer on the internet, I was hoping someone here could answer a question for me.

If I were to detail a RIP track area on my club's layout (whose era is the late 50's), what color would I paint the Oxygen & Acetylene tanks used in the repair of Steam Era Freight Cars?

Thanks!

gary roe
quincy, illinois








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Ljack70117@...
 

AS Tony Said Oxygen is always a dark green even in the hospital on rip track. Acetylene is always black. If you have your own tanks and they are not these colors they will not fill them for you
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left

On Dec 2, 2007, at 2:34 PM, Richard Brennan wrote:

At 11:25 12/2/2007, gary roe wrote:
After a futile attempt to find the answer on the internet, I was
hoping someone here could answer a question for me.

If I were to detail a RIP track area on my club's layout (whose era
is the late 50's), what color would I paint the Oxygen & Acetylene
tanks used in the repair of Steam Era Freight Cars?
I thought the tanks were color-coded by owner... not by contents?

Is there a journeyman welder in the house???


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------




Yahoo! Groups Links



rfederle@...
 

I have worked in the oilfield (and still do) for 30 years. Oxygen tanks are green and virtually with no exception. It must be said though that the oxygen for breathing air is NOT the same as oxygen used for welding or other industrial purposes.

I have seen acetylene tanks in various colors, with or wiithout the collar around the valve area (depends on the manufacturer). One thing that IS prominent is the shape. Oxygen bottles tend to be a small diameter (10" or so) and tall while acetylene bottles tend to be a larger (roughly 14" or so) diameter and shorter.

If you are modeling the area where you are now located, you might check with an Industrial Gas Supplier to see what color code they use and they maty have some historical info you may be able to use. Its possible some "old timer" around the company may know something.

Robert Federle
---- Ljack70117@... wrote:

AS Tony Said Oxygen is always a dark green even in the hospital on
rip track. Acetylene is always black. If you have your own tanks and
they are not these colors they will not fill them for you
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left




On Dec 2, 2007, at 2:34 PM, Richard Brennan wrote:

At 11:25 12/2/2007, gary roe wrote:
After a futile attempt to find the answer on the internet, I was
hoping someone here could answer a question for me.

If I were to detail a RIP track area on my club's layout (whose era
is the late 50's), what color would I paint the Oxygen & Acetylene
tanks used in the repair of Steam Era Freight Cars?
I thought the tanks were color-coded by owner... not by contents?

Is there a journeyman welder in the house???


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------




Yahoo! Groups Links



Ljack70117@...
 

See Below
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left




On Dec 2, 2007, at 2:47 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

gary roe wrote:
After a futile attempt to find the answer on the internet, I was
hoping someone here could answer a question for me.
If I were to detail a RIP track area on my club's layout (whose era is
the late 50's), what color would I paint the Oxygen & Acetylene tanks
used in the repair of Steam Era Freight Cars?
If you were in the states of NJ, KS and state of Washington they would object. I worked in many places in these states and oxygen was ALWAYS dark green even in the hospitals. Acetylene was ALWAYS Black. By those rules a new person could walk into you shop and KNOW what you had in your tanks. Also your tanks are to be chained to the wall or a cart so they could not fall over. Delivery trucks I have seen only had black and green bottles.
Never worked with other gases or in Europe so do not know about other gases.

If you painted your two tanks red and green, or black and green,
no one could object.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history




Yahoo! Groups Links



rfederle@...
 

Alink to wikipedia may help but it styates "no law in the US regarding color coding"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bottled_gas

Stick with the green for Oxygen and either a red or orange for the acetylene. The hoses for those types of gas bottles are indeed red and green with opposite threads on easch so they can only connect to the proper regulators.

Robert Federle


Rod Miller
 

The tanks 15 feet away in my shop are green (oxy) and red.

Rod


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Larry Jackman wrote:
AS Tony Said Oxygen is always a dark green even in the hospital on rip track. Acetylene is always black. If you have your own tanks and they are not these colors they will not fill them for you
Whether acetylene is black depends on the supplier. When I was working in a research lab, the supplier would not fill anyone's tanks but his own. If you owned one, you could figure out for yourself how to get it filled. It seemed like a bad idea to own one.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

If you owned one, you could figure out for yourself how to
get it filled. It seemed like a bad idea to own one.
As I recall, Linde, one of the dominant industrial gas suppliers, had
two different deals for tanks; rental, and ownership. The pricing of
the gas was different, since the rental fee was included in the price
of a full tank. While under the ownership plan you owned the tank,
Linde would only refill it if it was originally purchased from them.

When I was active out at the railway museum, we purchased welding gas
from both Linde and NCG (National Cylinder Gas) at various times. At
this time and place (Illinois, 1970's) both companies oxygen tanks
were green, and both companies acetylene tanks were black. The oxygen
"bottles" were tall and skinny with the distinctive screw-on valve
covers that everyone instantly recognizes as a welding gas bottle. One
of the suppliers used similar short bottles for acetylene, while the
other used the tanks with the raised rim and no valve cover, which
looked something like a recessed concave head air tank. I guess the
difference was in the working pressure of the bottles; oxygen comes at
2200 PSI, while acetylene is only compressed to something like 200 PSI.

One other detail to note, while current regulations (dating back to
state safety regulations that pre-date OSHA) require the bottles to be
upright and chained, the oxygen bottles will work laying down, and
more than one junk yard would have the oxy bottle laying in the back
of an old beater truck or station wagon. The acetylene, however, HAS
to be standing up, because the gas is dissolved in acetone, IIRC, and
it is not good to have the acetone pour through the regulator into the
torch.

Dennis


Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

Brings me back to my 20s when we built headers for our cars. We rented tanks and they always wrote down the new serial number on the tank and checked the old one in. Not sure if they use serial numbers anymore. I don't remember the colors but do remember the connectors were opposite threads so you couldn't connect the wrong hose to the wrong tank. Do remember the tanks were different sizes.

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Jason Greene <steamlocomotive290@...>
 

I would be careful, my uncle worked for Southern/NS on the RIP track and he noted that NS had gone to MAP gas. While this is not the time you speak of, I know that Oxy-Acetylene is not always the choice for cutting in all locations. Check pictures of yards in the area that you are modeling. You may not beable to gather what gases were being used but you can for sure figure out sizes and ratios for numbers of bottles.

In our shop all the bottles themselves are gray and the screw on caps are color coded. We use Oxy-Acetylene for cutting but we also have natural gas pipped in that is used in the forge and the rosebud for heating large surfaces.

Jason Greene
Steele, AL


Ryan Willobee
 

AS Tony Said Oxygen is always a dark green even in the hospital on
rip track. Acetylene is always black. If you have your own tanks and
they are not these colors they will not fill them for you
Thank you
Larry Jackman
While my tanks I own are green and black as mentioned, I know that the
Tractor Supply Store chain paints all of their tanks blue. If you want them
to refill your tanks, you must purchase their blue tanks.

Ryan Willobee


Walt Gay <waltrail1@...>
 

I know the question was the 50's, but I worked as a carman in the 70's
and the oxygen was orange and the actylene was black with a red collar!

Walt



--- In STMFC@..., RUTLANDRS@... wrote:

Gary,
In the 50's Acetelyne tanks were orange, almost a reefer
orange, and
Oxygen was and is A sort of Floquil Dark Green. Don't forget that
the hoses to
the torch are also those colors, yeah right.
Chuck Hladik



**************************************Check out AOL's list of 2007's
hottest
products.
(http://money.aol.com/special/hot-products-2007?NCID=aoltop00030000000001)


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jason Greene wrote:
In our shop all the bottles themselves are gray and the screw on caps are color coded.
I sure hope the caps have different threads so they can't be matched to the wrong bottle. Otherwise it strikes me as a pretty dangerous arrangement.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


John Hile <john66h@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "gary roe" <wabashrr@...> wrote:

what color would I paint the Oxygen & Acetylene tanks used in the
repair of Steam Era Freight Cars?
Gary,

There was an ANSI standard adopted in 1954 for proper marking and
labeling of tanks: Marking Portable Compressed Gas Containers to
Identify the Material Contained, ANSI Z48.1. It was revised in 1970
and again in 1992 I believe. Not sure if older ANSI docs show up at
used book vendors, eBay, etc.

Also, here is a link to circa 1970 US Army standard for color coding
pipes and tanks. Page 21 makes reference to commercial-owned
cylinders. The Army's color coding scheme is rather complicated, but
it looks as if there may be some cross-over to private sector
practices based on STMFC posts. http://www.wbdg.org/ccb/FEDMIL/std101b.pdf

Finally, here is a link to a DOE Hanford site document with some
government standards on tank marking. It is a more recent document,
but (again) based on others' postings here, there appears to be some
cross-over to vendor-owned cylinders.
http://www.hanford.gov/docs/rl-98-61/chapter10.pdf

John Hile
Blacksburg VA