Tichy Georgia SS rebuild


armprem
 

Correct me if I am wrong,but the roof on the Tichy car is
incorrect.Speedwitch has an accurate version of this car.Armand Premo


Tom or Gail Madden <tgmadden@...>
 

Correct me if I am wrong,but the roof on the Tichy car is
incorrect.Speedwitch has an accurate version of this car.Armand Premo
That was a special run Ted did for attendees at his first private freight car modeling seminar. He had a second batch done, but I think he sold all of those. They're not shown on his web site, and I think there were only 60 altogether.

Tom Madden


Don Worthy
 

hey guys
could I ask "what should the roof look like for the Georgia car?" Maybe something I could scratch build or modify.
Thank you for any help
Don Worthy
Ivey, Ga.

Tom or Gail Madden <tgmadden@...> wrote:
> Correct me if I am wrong,but the roof on the Tichy car is
incorrect.Speedwitch has an accurate version of this car.Armand Premo
That was a special run Ted did for attendees at his first private freight
car modeling seminar. He had a second batch done, but I think he sold all of
those. They're not shown on his web site, and I think there were only 60
altogether.

Tom Madden






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Tom Madden <tgmadden@...>
 

Don Worthy wrote:

hey guys
could I ask "what should the roof look like for the Georgia car?"
Maybe something I could scratch build or modify.
Thank you for any help
Don Worthy
Ivey, Ga.
Here's a photo of a spare body casting done from Ted's pattern:
http://home.att.net/~pullmanproject/Georgia.jpg

Hope this helps.

Tom Madden


Bruce Smith
 

On Jan 28, 2008, at 11:09 PM, Tom Madden wrote:

Don Worthy wrote:

hey guys
could I ask "what should the roof look like for the Georgia car?"
Maybe something I could scratch build or modify.
Thank you for any help
Don Worthy
Ivey, Ga.
Here's a photo of a spare body casting done from Ted's pattern:
http://home.att.net/~pullmanproject/Georgia.jpg

Hope this helps.
It might be easier to model the home made welded roof ;^) To do that, I just shaved off all of the seam caps on the Tichy roof. You can lightly scribe or even use 0.010" styrene rod or half round (albeit oversized) to model the weld beads if you like.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
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Scott Pitzer
 

--- In STMFC@..., Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:
It might be easier to model the home made welded roof ;^) To do
that, I just shaved off all of the seam caps on the Tichy roof. You
can lightly scribe or even use 0.010" styrene rod or half round
(albeit oversized) to model the weld beads if you like.
=========================================================
That's what I intend to do, and fairly soon (a local shop cut the price
because no one builds kits anymore.)
But how many weld seams should there be?

Scott Pitzer


Bruce Smith
 

On Jan 29, 2008, at 8:21 AM, Scott Pitzer wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:
It might be easier to model the home made welded roof ;^) To do
that, I just shaved off all of the seam caps on the Tichy roof. You
can lightly scribe or even use 0.010" styrene rod or half round
(albeit oversized) to model the weld beads if you like.
=========================================================
That's what I intend to do, and fairly soon (a local shop cut the price
because no one builds kits anymore.)
But how many weld seams should there be?

Scott Pitzer
Scott,

Its hard to tell from photos. The panels appear to overlap at the seams by several inches, but the joints look relatively smooth. That's why I did not bother to model the joints at all <G>. It also appears that the running board supports were mounted on the seams. That makes sense, since the area is twice as thick, and more than likely overlies a carline. Unlike the radial roof, which has narrow end panels, all of the panels appear to be the same width. I count 13 running board supports, 2 at each end and 11 intermediate, so there are most likely 12 panels in the welded roof.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I'd like to know as well, so that I can correct the inacurracy on the
Tichy model.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "Scott Pitzer" <scottp459@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., Bruce Smith <smithbf@> wrote:
It might be easier to model the home made welded roof ;^) To do
that, I just shaved off all of the seam caps on the Tichy roof.
You
can lightly scribe or even use 0.010" styrene rod or half round
(albeit oversized) to model the weld beads if you like.
=========================================================
That's what I intend to do, and fairly soon (a local shop cut the
price
because no one builds kits anymore.)
But how many weld seams should there be?

Scott Pitzer


Don Worthy
 

I want to thank Tom and Bruce for this help. I do need to ask one more question, although.
It looks to be easier to build the cars that Bruce speaks of but, what were the car numbers that used this "smooth" roof?....for lack of the true name.
Thanks again to both of you
Don Worthy
Ivey, Ga.
Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

On Jan 29, 2008, at 8:21 AM, Scott Pitzer wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:
It might be easier to model the home made welded roof ;^) To do
that, I just shaved off all of the seam caps on the Tichy roof. You
can lightly scribe or even use 0.010" styrene rod or half round
(albeit oversized) to model the weld beads if you like.
=========================================================
That's what I intend to do, and fairly soon (a local shop cut the
price
because no one builds kits anymore.)
But how many weld seams should there be?

Scott Pitzer
Scott,

Its hard to tell from photos. The panels appear to overlap at the
seams by several inches, but the joints look relatively smooth.
That's why I did not bother to model the joints at all <G>. It also
appears that the running board supports were mounted on the seams.
That makes sense, since the area is twice as thick, and more than
likely overlies a carline. Unlike the radial roof, which has narrow
end panels, all of the panels appear to be the same width. I count
13 running board supports, 2 at each end and 11 intermediate, so
there are most likely 12 panels in the welded roof.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0






---------------------------------
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Frank Greene
 

It might be easier to model the home made welded roof ;^) To do
that, I just shaved off all of the seam caps on the Tichy roof. You
can lightly scribe or even use 0.010" styrene rod or half round
(albeit oversized) to model the weld beads if you like.
Bruce
There are 4 or 5 of the GA Road rebuilds sitting on blocks at Midsouth Supply in Mableton, GA (GA 19555, homemade roof, is identifiable from the street). I haven't examined them up close, but at least one appears to have the radial Hutchins roof while the others I could see from the street have flat panel, welded seam roofs.

Frank Greene
Memphis, TN


Bruce Smith
 

On Jan 29, 2008, at 11:26 AM, Don Worthy wrote:

I want to thank Tom and Bruce for this help. I do need to ask one more question, although.
It looks to be easier to build the cars that Bruce speaks of but, what were the car numbers that used this "smooth" roof?....for lack of the true name.
Thanks again to both of you
Don Worthy
Ivey, Ga.
From photos, with reweigh dates:

#19580 - silver (1948)
#19695 - red (1951)
#19712 - red (1954)
#19715 - silver (1951?)

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


gd3006
 

There is another surviving car in East Point, original number not known.
It has been sprayed brown and given L&N reporting marks -for some
strange reason- but but was silver/black upon its arrival in that
location, so I am told. The roof on this car is a welded lap seam.
The are 11 laps 6" in width, centered above the original carlines,
for a total of 12 panels. Panel width varies somewhat, as the carline
spacing is not uniform. The laps are at a higher level than the balance
of the roof, so cementing strips to the model's roof would be more
effective than trying to simulate weld beads.
I've driven by Midsouth Supply, but never noticed those cars. I'll have
to pay attention next time...
Graham Dean


Charles Hladik
 

Al,
John Johnson a PRR fan and extremely excellent modeler uses some form of
foil for his roof and seams. I've seen the results, fantastic.
JJ doesn't have/use a computer but is usually at Napierville, you may be
able to catch up with him there or in the contest room at the NMRA MER
conventions.
Good luck,

Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division
NMRA L5756




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al_brown03
 

After sanding the original carlines all the way off the roof, I decided
to model the weld overlaps. I used strips, whose difficulty is their
thickness. The styrene strips I found (thinnest Evergreen sells)
are .010" thick, which is about a scale 7/8" in HO. But if I understand
correctly, the extra thickness at the overlaps should be the thickness
of the roof sheet, since two are overlapped there. Poking through
the '22 CBC, I find thicknesses of 1/8" or so; an HO scale 1/8" is
about .0014". That's *thin*! So I glued strips down and sanded them
until they started to catch on the sandpaper, but I still think they're
over scale thickness. I hope to bring the car to Cocoa Beach next year,
and y'all can decide if I made convincing weld overlaps or if they just
look like wider flatter carlines.

If I were doing another one, I'd sand the original carlines down until
they were barely visible and smooth their edges with a little putty. I
may do it, just to see if it works.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@..., "gd3006" <gbd99@...> wrote:

There is another surviving car in East Point, original number not
known.
It has been sprayed brown and given L&N reporting marks -for some
strange reason- but but was silver/black upon its arrival in that
location, so I am told. The roof on this car is a welded lap seam.
The are 11 laps 6" in width, centered above the original carlines,
for a total of 12 panels. Panel width varies somewhat, as the carline
spacing is not uniform. The laps are at a higher level than the
balance
of the roof, so cementing strips to the model's roof would be more
effective than trying to simulate weld beads.
I've driven by Midsouth Supply, but never noticed those cars. I'll
have
to pay attention next time...
Graham Dean


al_brown03
 

Hi Armand --

After rebuilding there were two roofs (rooves?): a radial roof, and a
home-made welded roof. For discussion and pictures please see
Culotta, "Steam Era Freight Cars Reference Manual, vol 1", pp 42-43.
The Tichy model has the original USRA roof, which (as you point out)
doesn't correctly represent either rebuilt roof; the discussion on
this thread a month ago, which my recent comment continues, was about
modifying the USRA roof to represent the welded roof.

Looking on the Speedwitch web site, perhaps I'm looking in the wrong
place but I don't see a model of this car.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@..., "armprem1" <armprem@...> wrote:

Correct me if I am wrong,but the roof on the Tichy car is
incorrect.Speedwitch has an accurate version of this car.Armand
Premo


al_brown03
 

My bad! I wrote a new reply to the first message in the thread. I plead
idiocy.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., "armprem1" <armprem@...> wrote:

Correct me if I am wrong,but the roof on the Tichy car is
incorrect.Speedwitch has an accurate version of this car.Armand Premo


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Al, Evergreen isn't the only source of styrene. Go to Staples, and look for the report covers.
Very carefully bend one over your fingernail, or some other sharp surface. If it goes cloudy at the
stress, it's clear styrene, and these are typically about .004" thick. Some are .005". And one
report cover will hold your needs for years.

SGL

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of al_brown03
Sent: Friday, February 29, 2008 10:50 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Tichy Georgia SS rebuild

After sanding the original carlines all the way off the roof, I decided
to model the weld overlaps. I used strips, whose difficulty is their
thickness. The styrene strips I found (thinnest Evergreen sells)
are .010" thick, which is about a scale 7/8" in HO. But if I understand
correctly, the extra thickness at the overlaps should be the thickness
of the roof sheet, since two are overlapped there. Poking through
the '22 CBC, I find thicknesses of 1/8" or so; an HO scale 1/8" is
about .0014". That's *thin*! So I glued strips down and sanded them
until they started to catch on the sandpaper, but I still think they're
over scale thickness. I hope to bring the car to Cocoa Beach next year,
and y'all can decide if I made convincing weld overlaps or if they just
look like wider flatter carlines.

If I were doing another one, I'd sand the original carlines down until
they were barely visible and smooth their edges with a little putty. I
may do it, just to see if it works.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "gd3006" <gbd99@...> wrote:

There is another surviving car in East Point, original number not
known.
It has been sprayed brown and given L&N reporting marks -for some
strange reason- but but was silver/black upon its arrival in that
location, so I am told. The roof on this car is a welded lap seam.
The are 11 laps 6" in width, centered above the original carlines,
for a total of 12 panels. Panel width varies somewhat, as the carline
spacing is not uniform. The laps are at a higher level than the
balance
of the roof, so cementing strips to the model's roof would be more
effective than trying to simulate weld beads.
I've driven by Midsouth Supply, but never noticed those cars. I'll
have
to pay attention next time...
Graham Dean



Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I have to wonder if 20# bond paper strips would work for the carlines-
-they would be far thinner at about .003" thick. I have used solvent
applied through paper to bond it to styrene before. I should try
this on my Tichy SS rebuild, where that peaked roof is really nagging
me now that I know that it's wrong.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "al_brown03" <abrown@...> wrote:

After sanding the original carlines all the way off the roof, I
decided
to model the weld overlaps. I used strips, whose difficulty is
their
thickness. The styrene strips I found (thinnest Evergreen sells)
are .010" thick, which is about a scale 7/8" in HO. But if I
understand
correctly, the extra thickness at the overlaps should be the
thickness
of the roof sheet, since two are overlapped there. Poking through
the '22 CBC, I find thicknesses of 1/8" or so; an HO scale 1/8" is
about .0014". That's *thin*! So I glued strips down and sanded them
until they started to catch on the sandpaper, but I still think
they're
over scale thickness. I hope to bring the car to Cocoa Beach next
year,
and y'all can decide if I made convincing weld overlaps or if they
just
look like wider flatter carlines.

If I were doing another one, I'd sand the original carlines down
until
they were barely visible and smooth their edges with a little
putty. I
may do it, just to see if it works.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.