1940s tank car questions


ed_mines
 

Did any customers unload gasoline from a team track or a siding as they
needed it?

Did farm equipment run on gasoline?

Was tank car utilization greater during the winter when petroleum
couldn't be delivered by water?

Ed


water.kresse@...
 

I would guess that the late-1940s, post-WW2 era was a transition time between gas and diesel fuel for running larger farm equipment. Little Ford and Farmall "estate" and "quarter-section farm" tractors stayed gas feed for some time. Wouldn't a local coal yard keep fuels of various types? When did they start distributing home heating oil and running big trucks around to houses and farms? Dad pulled out the coal fired furnace in the very early-50s.

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: "ed_mines" <ed_mines@yahoo.com>
Did any customers unload gasoline from a team track or a siding as they
needed it?

Did farm equipment run on gasoline?

Was tank car utilization greater during the winter when petroleum
couldn't be delivered by water?

Ed


boyds1949 <E27ca@...>
 

A neighbor purchased a diesel Farmall "M" (like the Sunshine kit) in
1948 but that was quite unusual. Allis Chalmers did not indroduce a
diesel farm tractor until 1953 or 54.

In Maryland, the same distributers who provided gasoline to filling
stations also provided gasoline and, later, diesel fuel to farmers.
When "modern" electric pumps were installed at the local gas
stations, the old hand crank jobs were recycled as farm pumps. When
the gasoline station pumps were replaced with more modern versions,
the older electric pumps were installed on the farm tanks.

John King

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, water.kresse@... wrote:

I would guess that the late-1940s, post-WW2 era was a transition
time between gas and diesel fuel for running larger farm equipment.
Little Ford and Farmall "estate" and "quarter-section farm" tractors
stayed gas feed for some time. Wouldn't a local coal yard keep fuels
of various types? When did they start distributing home heating oil
and running big trucks around to houses and farms? Dad pulled out
the coal fired furnace in the very early-50s.

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...>
Did any customers unload gasoline from a team track or a siding as
they
needed it?

Did farm equipment run on gasoline?

Was tank car utilization greater during the winter when petroleum
couldn't be delivered by water?

Ed




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Mark P.
 

Ed,

To answer one question:
Did farm equipment run on gasoline?
Yes. Not sure when diesel engines became popular in tractors (I'm sure someone tried it shortly after van/von Diesel built his first engine [in the 1880s? I'm away from research information now]), but our first diesel was a Ford 4000 in 1964. Dad had a 1948 Farmall C and a 1952 860 Ford that ran on gas, an earlier tractor was a Ford 9N that used gas. Two Allis-Chalmers C's I used when helping a neighbor while growing up were new in 1930 and used gas - he is still farming with them! In checking out the local parades, most of the "antique" tractors seem to be gas. Not a scientific answer, but in my limited experience, gas prevailed until the past 20 or so years. Our combines also ran on gas both at home and when I was on wheat harvest in 1981.

Mark Plank

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Andy Laurent <andy.laurent@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...> wrote:

Did any customers unload gasoline from a team track or a siding as
they
needed it?

Did farm equipment run on gasoline?

Was tank car utilization greater during the winter when petroleum
couldn't be delivered by water?

Ed
Ed, what locale are you modeling?

In the Midwest, retail fuel dealers (typically called "jobbers")
existed in almost every small town with railroad service. The
shortline I model was only 34 miles long, but had 16 bulk oil dealers
in 1950. They were the most common rail customers for bulk fuels.

One of those dealers was located off-line, but did not use a team
track/truck arrangement for their deliveries. They had 3 vertical
storage tanks along a siding, and would unload the tankcar there
(using standard rack/pumps/piping system) and run their truck to/from
those storage tanks. That would be a great "small footprint" industry
to model...a few tanks (gasoline, fuel oil, maybe diesel), an
unloading stand/rack, and a pump house.

This traffic all but dried up on the A&W between 1952 and 1956 as oil
company terminals switched to trucks for short-haul distribution of
petroleum products. Standard Oil was the exception, as they continued
to send bulk fuel on the 50-mile rail routing.

As for winter tank car utilization...I can only guess. Fuel oil usage
would have been higher in the winter (heating), but gasoline demand
was higher in summer (vacations)...so it may have evened out.

Andy Laurent
modeling the Ahnapee & Western Railway in the early 1950s


Perry Scheuerman <perry.scheuerman@...>
 

Ed,
Our 30's vintage John Deere Model D was made to start on gasoline and run on "power fuel" which was more like kerosene than gasoline. Tractor fuel was a special blend made by the refineries. We still made the stuff in the 60's, dyed blue for Nebraska and green for Kansas. I suspect most of the older tractors ran on that stuff. By the 50's new tractors were using gasoline and diesel.
Perry Scheuerman

Mark Plank <tandocrr@mail.com> wrote:
Ed,

To answer one question:
Did farm equipment run on gasoline?
Yes. Not sure when diesel engines became popular in tractors (I'm sure someone tried it shortly after van/von Diesel built his first engine [in the 1880s? I'm away from research information now]), but our first diesel was a Ford 4000 in 1964. Dad had a 1948 Farmall C and a 1952 860 Ford that ran on gas, an earlier tractor was a Ford 9N that used gas. Two Allis-Chalmers C's I used when helping a neighbor while growing up were new in 1930 and used gas - he is still farming with them! In checking out the local parades, most of the "antique" tractors seem to be gas. Not a scientific answer, but in my limited experience, gas prevailed until the past 20 or so years. Our combines also ran on gas both at home and when I was on wheat harvest in 1981.

Mark Plank

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Get a free e-mail account today at www.mail.com!






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Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

Dad had a Farmall F-12 and later and F-14 both from the 1930s. Both
were started on gasoline and, when warmed up, switched to diesel fuel.
The "gas" tank was in two parts, the larger for diesel. Dad always ran
it on gasoline only.
Gene Green


Jared Harper <harper-brown@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...> wrote:

Did any customers unload gasoline from a team track or a siding as
they
needed it?
In small towns in the midwest oil jobbers were often located along the
house track as were other businesses. Each jobber had a stand pipe for
unloading the cars. At Eskridge of Santa Fe's Alma branch stand pipes
for two jobbers were on the house track while the jobbers were along
the main. The oil was piped under the track to tanks. This is not to
say that some jobbers did not get their fuel on team tracks.

Did farm equipment run on gasoline?
During WWII tractors ran on a very low grade of fuel. I'd have to go
to my notes to tell you what it was called. The octane was slightly
higher than kerosene.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Earl Tuson
 

Did farm equipment run on gasoline?
As has already been said, most agricultural tractors built during the period of this list had gasoline motors, which could alternatively run on tractor fuel a.k.a 'distillate' a.k.a tractor vaporising oil (TVO.) However, many early tractors were designed to run on kerosene, and this remained an option for some years. "All fuel" motors were designed to run on any of these fuels. Distillate and kerosene availabilty and use as a motor fuel waned after WW-II, for pricing and technological reasons. Other tractors were equipped for running on propane.

A neighbor purchased a diesel Farmall "M" (like the Sunshine kit) in
1948 but that was quite unusual.�� Allis Chalmers did not indroduce a
diesel farm tractor until 1953 or 54.��
Farmall initially offered a diesel motor in their model MD, with the first one built 1/3/41. Even so, you would still start the motor on gas from a small auxillary tank, and then manually switch it over to diesel. They weren't exceptionally popular (they can be considered rare today.) If you care for numbers, production quantiies for most tractors by year can be found online. There were no "compact diesel" tractors like there are today. Even by the end of the period covered by this list, only the largest tractors were diesel.

Two Allis-Chalmers C's I used when helping a neighbor while growing up were new in 1930
FWIW, the AC C wasn't produced until 1940.

tractordata.com is a pretty good place to start if you want to know what models of tractors might be appropriate for flat car loadings for the year you model. ytmag.com has a lot of information as well. Be aware, however, that there were significant regional differences in what brands and models would be most common or popular.

Earl Tuson
I don't farm with anything younger than me:
'54 Farmall Super C
'55 Farmall 200
'56 Farmall 200 with a mounted bean picker
'67 JD 400


Jim Ogden
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...> wrote:

Did any customers unload gasoline from a team track or a siding as
they
needed it?

Did farm equipment run on gasoline?

Was tank car utilization greater during the winter when petroleum
couldn't be delivered by water?

Ed
Hi Ed,

Like most early tractors, Ford's 9N and its successor the (virutally
identical for modeling purposes) postwar 8N both had gasoline engines
( a newer model often had a lower number number in typcial Henry Ford
logic). They could be worked on by a shadetree mechanic more easily
than a diesel.

I'm fairly many farmers would go to a trackside fuel dealer (rather
than a team track) most Saturdays (often their only weekly trip into
town) to fill up gas cans to take back to the farm since the fuel
consumption on these tractors on a 40 acre farm was not that much and
you didn't plow every day. I'd get one of the Athearn model A Ford
trucks and have HO military style war surplus gas cans or 55 gallon
oil drums. Often the fuel dealer was the same outfit who sold seed
in the spring, supplies, new plow blades and even acted as brokers for
mules or new tractors. So I doubt the team track idea would be that
common, but a tiny unloading facility with tanks for diesel, gasoline,
and heating oil would not take up too much space on a layout.

Eventually most got their own fuel tanks on their farms and ordered
tax-exempt gasoline which had a dye added so the state could see if
anyone were putting this fuel in their automobiles. You could order
LP gas, gasoline, oil, or diesel from the same fuel dealer and have it
delivered just like in the big cities where people ordered heating oil
for an underground tank.

From what I understand, a lot of local grain co-ops after WWII would
order tank cars of LP gas and there would be a spike in LP gas (or
heating oil in the midwest) in winter. I am fairly certain the dye
fwas added to "refund" gasoline for farm equipment at the fuel dealer.

Jim "Mr. Green Jeans" Ogden
Fort Worth, Texas


rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

During WWII tractors ran on a very low grade of fuel. I'd have to
go
to my notes to tell you what it was called. The octane was
slightly
higher than kerosene.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA
More cars from the Fairfax Agent's seal book. I don't know how badly
Yahoo format will screw the columns up.

DATE TRAIN NO. INTIALS NUMBER CONTENTS
BUSINESS
3/17/1947 73 UTLX 20748 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
5/27/1947 99 DRX 6114 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
5/27/1947 99 UTLX 21364 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
6/10/1947 99 AHPX 9055 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
6/18/1947 73 UTLX 5690 DISTILLATE STANDARD OIL
6/23/1947 73 ARKX 217 DISTILLATE CITY
7/2/1947 73 NATX 16743 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
7/4/1947 73 ARKX 209 DISTILLATE CITY
7/8/1947 99 DRX 6112 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
7/14/1947 73 ARKX 206 DISTILLATE CITY
7/18/1947 73 SHPX 10524 DISTILLATE CITY
7/23/1947 73 GATX 14620 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
7/30/1947 73 ARKX 207 DISTILLATE CITY
8/9/1947 72 SHPX 484 DISTILLATE CITY
8/18/1947 73 UTLX 18605 DISTILLATE STANDARD OIL
9/2/1947 73 UTLX 6470 DISTILLATE STANDARD OIL
9/2/1947 73 UTLX 8478 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
9/3/1947 99 UTLX 74186 DISTILLATE STANDARD OIL
9/11/1947 X620 SHPX 21793 DISTILLATE CITY
9/17/1947 73 UTLX 77249 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
9/22/1947 73 CSOX 1130 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
9/22/1947 73 UTLX 21916 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
9/24/1947 99 UTLX 15609 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
9/27/1947 99 UTLX 20018 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
10/1/1947 73 SHPX 10529 DISTILLATE CITY
10/10/1947 99 WEOX 615 DISTILLATE BUERKLE OIL
10/14/1947 99 GATX 86 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
10/20/1947 73 DRX 6277 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
10/24/1947 99 ARKX 210 DISTILLATE CITY
10/31/1947 99 UTLX 11813 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
11/3/1947 73 KOTX 501 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
11/5/1947 73 SHPX 10574 DISTILLATE CITY
11/7/1947 73 CONX 3528 DISTILLATE CITY
11/14/1947 73 CONX 3545 DISTILLATE CITY
11/14/1947 73 LUX 1114 DISTILLATE CITY
11/14/1947 73 LUX 253 DISTILLATE CITY
11/19/1947 73 PECX 873 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
11/21/1947 73 SHPX 21931 DISTILLATE CITY
11/21/1947 73 UTLX 20701 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
11/25/1947 X547 UTLX 7048 DISTILLATE BUERKLE OIL
12/5/1947 99 UTLX 21315 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
12/19/1947 99 KOTX 882 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
12/20/1947 99 SHPX 21692 DISTILLATE CITY
12/23/1947 99 UTLX 15772 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
12/27/1947 99 KOTX 8251 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
12/31/1947 73 UTLX 21307 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
1/8/1948 99 ARKX 201 DISTILLATE CITY
1/19/1948 73 UTLX 11357 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
1/24/1948 99 SHPX 10524 DISTILLATE CITY
1/27/1948 99 UTLX 15197 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
1/27/1948 99 UTLX 76499 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
2/2/1948 73 GATX 67 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
2/3/1948 99 SHPX 4197 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
2/3/1948 99 SHPX 10565 DISTILLATE CITY
2/16/1948 73 RUTX 8062 DISTILLATE VILLAGE
2/16/1948 73 UTLX 6622 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
2/16/1948 73 UTLX 76464 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
2/27/1948 99 SHPX 21149 DISTILLATE CITY
2/28/1948 99 ROTX 8107 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
3/2/1948 99 SRX 6611 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
3/13/1948 99 SHPX 21616 DISTILLATE CITY
3/17/1948 73 ARKX 222 DISTILLATE CITY
3/19/1948 73 ARKX 224 DISTILLATE LIGHT PLANT
3/23/1948 99 PECX 182 DISTILLATE CITY
4/1/1948 99 OZKX 237 DISTILLATE ?
4/5/1948 99 UTLX DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
4/7/1948 99 ARKX 201 DISTILLATE LIGHT PLANT
4/19/1948 73 CSOX 5427 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
4/19/1948 73 EORX 5269 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
4/21/1948 99 ARKX 210 DISTILLATE CITY
4/30/1948 ? ARKX 215 DISTILLATE CITY
4/30/1948 ? GATX 5546 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
5/3/1948 73 UTLX 21401 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
5/10/1948 ? ARKX 217 DISTILLATE CITY
5/10/1948 ? KOTX 8703 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
5/12/1948 99 DRX 6561 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
5/21/1948 73 DRX 6437 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
5/25/1948 99 NATX 5050 DISTILLATE CITY
5/25/1948 99 SHPX 10579 DISTILLATE CITY
5/29/1948 99 ARKX 203 DISTILLATE CITY
5/29/1948 99 NATX 3728 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
6/4/1948 73 NATX 5750 DISTILLATE LIGHT PLANT
6/14/1948 73 LUX 850 DISTILLATE CITY
6/16/1948 73 CSOX 4150 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
6/16/1948 73 EORX 6387 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
6/19/1948 73 PECX 105 DISTILLATE CITY
6/28/1948 73 LUX 891 DISTILLATE CITY
7/5/1948 73 LUX 279 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
7/14/1948 73 KOTX 8138 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
7/14/1948 73 LUX 850 DISTILLATE CITY


Schuyler Larrabee
 

That sounds right, Al. We moved to "the new house" in early '56 (I was seven). The old house was
oil, used in a converted-from-stoker-fed coal. My dad did the conversion himself - I know that
because of the family joking about how filthy he got while doing that. The new house was gas heat,
and my mother was so happy that she did not have to deal with oil soot anymore . . .

I know that the coal and oil were delivered by rail behind steam to Binghamton.(Whew!!)


SGL

I would guess that the late-1940s, post-WW2 era was a transition time between gas and diesel fuel
for running larger
farm equipment. Little Ford and Farmall "estate" and "quarter-section farm" tractors stayed gas
feed for some time.
Wouldn't a local coal yard keep fuels of various types? When did they start distributing home
heating oil and running big
trucks around to houses and farms? Dad pulled out the coal fired furnace in the very early-50s.

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: "ed_mines" <ed_mines@yahoo.com <mailto:ed_mines%40yahoo.com> >
Did any customers unload gasoline from a team track or a siding as they
needed it?

Did farm equipment run on gasoline?

Was tank car utilization greater during the winter when petroleum
couldn't be delivered by water?

Ed


Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

Another (only) use for multi-dome tank cars.

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 16, 2008, at 8:03 AM, rockroll50401 wrote:

More cars from the Fairfax Agent's seal book.
A fascinating list for those of us who are interested in tank car
traffic. Some of the reporting marks such as UTLX, GATX, SHPX, and
NATX require no explanation. Others are not so obvious, so I've
identified them below.

I had no idea so much distillate was consumed in the midwest,
presumably mostly by farm and industrial equipment.


AHPX = This one is puzzling. AHPX reporting marks do not appear in any
of the ORERs I have, and I have been unable to find other reporting
marks for which this could plausibly be a misprint.

ARKX = The Arkansas Co., El Dorado, Ark.

CONX = The Continental Oil Co. (Conoco), Pnca City, Okla.

CSOX = The Cities Service Oil Co., New York, NY

DRX = Deep Rock Oil Corp., Chicago, Ill.

EORX = The Cities Service Oil Co. of Delaware (formerly the Eastern Oil
& Refrigeration Co.), Tulsa, Okla.

KOTX = Kanotex Refining Co., Arkansas City, Kans.

LUX = Lion Oil Co., El Dorado, Ark.

OZKX = The Deep Rock Oil Corp., Chicago, Ill. (formerly owned by the
Ozark Car Corp.).

PECX = Pioneer Equipment Co., Oklahoma City, Okla.

ROTX = Misprint for RUTX; see below

RUTX = Root Petroleum Co., El Dorado, Ark.

SRX = Seaboard Refining Co.,Ltd., New Orleans, LA

WEOX = White Eagle Division, Socony-Vacuum Oil Co. (Mobilgas), Kansas
City, MO


Richard Hendrickson


rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

Thanks for looking up the reporting marks Richard. I posted the entire
excel sheet in the files section. There will be a link email. There are
a lot more tank cars. At a glance the cars with gas went to some
different jobbers.

If any of the info is incorrect, please list me know so I can change
it. The original list was made by Sam Sherman.

Clark Propst


Eric
 

Mark Plank wrote:

"Yes. Not sure when diesel engines became popular in tractors (I'm
sure someone tried it shortly after van/von Diesel built his first
engine [in the 1880s? I'm away from research information now]),"

Actually Herbert Akroyd Stuart built and patented the diesel engine
in 1890 and had one running in England by 1891, years before Rudoph
Diesel and and the building of his prototype.

As I understand it early diesel engines had a low horsepower to
weight ratio which made them unsuitable for other than stationary
applications and that's why gas engines were used for electro-motive
railcars at first.

There were a few applications, such as John Froelich who created a
oil engine farm tractor in 1892.


Eric Petersson


Douglas Harding <dharding@...>
 

To follow up with Clark's list from the Fairfax Seal list, I have uploaded a
Excel file <49mstlminburndallascenteroil.xls>. This is a listing of all the
petroleum products delivered in 1949 to two stations on the M&StL, to two
small towns Dallas Center and Minburn, NW of Des Moines, Ia. The list
includes, tank car data, refinery if known, Tim Gilbert created this file
from to information I had compiled. You will note not a drop of diesel,
mostly distilate and gasoline with some fuel oil and lube oil. While this
file only covers 1949, in later years something called "road oil" was
delivered in the summer. This could be one of two products, 1) oil used in
make asphalt as rural roads were being payed a heavy tar like oil, or 2) oil
used to coat gravel roads to hold down the dust in the summer, which might
be waste or used oil.

I have copies of the Station Car record books for both towns from the early
40's to the mid 60's. They show every car delivered, what it contained,
where it was going and where it came from.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org

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2:16 PM


Jack Burgess
 

Doug mentioned:

While this
file only covers 1949, in later years something called "road oil" was
delivered in the summer. This could be one of two products, 1) oil used in
make asphalt as rural roads were being paved a heavy tar like
oil, or 2) oil
used to coat gravel roads to hold down the dust in the summer, which might
be waste or used oil.
Although they may have used a different term in those days, asphalt pavement
is produced with asphalt which, unlike common lubricating oil, must be
heated to around 350 degrees and mixed with aggregate to produce paving
asphalt. While waste or used oil might have been used to spray on gravel
roads, it wouldn't be very effective in the long run. I suspect that "road
oil" was actually a lower grade of asphalt that would be heated and sprayed
onto the gravel. As the road oil cooled, it would bind the gravel together,
creating a smooth surface as well as reducing dust. One of the problems of
gravel roads where speeds are higher is that the gravel is continually
pushed to the center and edges of the road, resulting in the need for
continual grading to maintain the surface; in the snow belt, that uneven
surface will really deteriorate during the winter. In addition, failure to
maintain a gravel road will eventually result in a "washboard" surface.
Grading the surface to produce a good cross-section and then applying road
oil can eliminate a lot of maintenance problems.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Chet French <cfrench@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Jack Burgess" <jack@...> wrote:

Doug mentioned:

While this
file only covers 1949, in later years something called "road oil"
was
delivered in the summer. This could be one of two products, 1)
oil used in
make asphalt as rural roads were being paved a heavy tar like
oil, or 2) oil
used to coat gravel roads to hold down the dust in the summer,
which might
be waste or used oil.
Although they may have used a different term in those days, asphalt
pavement
is produced with asphalt which, unlike common lubricating oil, must
be
heated to around 350 degrees and mixed with aggregate to produce
paving
asphalt. While waste or used oil might have been used to spray on
gravel
roads, it wouldn't be very effective in the long run. I suspect
that "road
oil" was actually a lower grade of asphalt that would be heated and
sprayed
onto the gravel. As the road oil cooled, it would bind the gravel
together,
creating a smooth surface as well as reducing dust. One of the
problems of
gravel roads where speeds are higher is that the gravel is
continually
pushed to the center and edges of the road, resulting in the need
for
continual grading to maintain the surface; in the snow belt, that
uneven
surface will really deteriorate during the winter. In addition,
failure to
maintain a gravel road will eventually result in a "washboard"
surface.
Grading the surface to produce a good cross-section and then
applying road
oil can eliminate a lot of maintenance problems.

Several years ago, I posted two lists of all inbound loads for
Staunton, IL on the ITC, from 1944 to 1951. These lists included
many cars of liquid asphalt (road oil) which were shipped out of the
Roxana and Wood River refineries. The lists can be found in messages
10627 and 10656.

Chet French
Dixon, IL


Earl Tuson
 

This is a listing of all the
petroleum products delivered in 1949 to two stations on the M&StL, to two
small towns Dallas Center and Minburn, NW of Des Moines, Ia. The list
includes, tank car data, refinery if known, Tim Gilbert created this file
from to information I had compiled. You will note not a drop of diesel,
mostly distilate and gasoline with some fuel oil and lube oil. While this
file only covers 1949, in later years something called "road oil" was
delivered in the summer.
The loaded tank car records in the 1929-30 B&M wheel report I have been working on certainly do not capture such a complete picture as the data Doug provided. However, the car loadings (from some 1600 line entries) below offer a somewhat different picture from a different part of the country and during an earlier era:

Marks No. Lading Destination
PFTX 208 Molasses St Albans VT
CSRX 1326 Fuel Oil Barton VT
CSRX 1514 Fuel Oil Norwich VT
GATX 18743 Gasoline Barre VT
UTLX 16079 Gasoline North Woodstock NH
UTLX 20482 Gasoline Concord NH
UTLX 24516 Gasoline North Woodstock NH
UTLX 27964 Gasoline Ashland NH
UTLX 35249 Gasoline Concord NH
GATX 18725 Kero Barre VT
UTLX 13911 Pet Oil Nashua NH
UTLX 29826 Pet Oil Nashua NH

No house car loadings of drummed products show in the records, although some cars were carrying empty drums or barrels- I have no idea if those had been used for petroleum products. Smaller quantites of lubricating products and such were surely hauled LCL, but we have little way to quantify that.

Earl Tuson