A Purpose For Frt Car Distribution Studies. Was: Re: Re:Fwd: Re: F


Cyril Durrenberger
 

The very large Texaco refinery in Port Arthur was built in 1902. The equally large Gulf refinery next door in Port Arthur was built in 1901. These were two of the large refineries in the US for many years and still produce large quantities today. Add the large Mobil refinery in Beaumont and some others in the golden triangle. This is normally called southeast Texas. Then there was the large Humble (later Exxon) refinery in Baytown built in about 1905 to refine in part the crude from the Humble oil field discovered in 1904. This has always been one of Exxon's largest refineries. All of these companies had large fleets of tank cars, some of which were leased, depending on the era on is modeling.

I suggest you read "Early Texas Oil" to get a better idea of the oil and gas production and refinery operations in Texas. A similar book on "Early Oklahoma Oil" will provide data for Oklahoma.

Reminds me of one comment on another list of someone saying it never rained in Texas. He had changed planes once in El Paso, on the other end of the state, and that was his only experience in the state.

Cyril Durrenberger

devansprr <devans1@...> wrote:
--- In STMFC@..., "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

Incidentally, I note that two of the 35 trains in my frt conductor's
book
contain a few Sinclair tank cars. One with 59 [ 63% ] and one with 52 [
42% ]. Based on max train lengths of 35 cars, that means I will need
22 SDRX
tank cars. I have [ gasp ] 5.
Something tells me...

Mike Brock
Mike,

With all of the discussion I have lost track - your conductor book is
UP main in WY post war?

Modeling WWII I'm trying to keep track of which would be the likely
reporting marks on tank trains that ran over the PRR in the east.

Plus, I was under the impression that during this era that a lot of
the refining was north of the gulf - closer to Oklahoma, northern TX,
Kansas, and even eastern Colorado? Gulf coast refining flourished
later after drilling started in the gulf??

Bruce, don't forget that one of the key WWII refineries was Sun oil's
high-octane av-gas refinery in Marcus Hook, PA (between Wilmington DE
and Philly) - I think the crude came over tunnel hill, then down
through Columbia to the DC-Philly main, and then ran north through
Wilmington. Sun's hi-octane fuel was thought to be a major technical
breakthrough in suporting high altitude, super-charged aircraft. I
think I've seen at least one picture of such a train near Wilmington
in an old High Line. What I do not know is if the finished product was
loaded onto ships at Marcus Hook (on the Delaware), or moved by rail
up to the NYC port area.

Sorry if this is getting too far off topic. Being a relative newcomer,
should this type of info be on the Opsig group? Not that relevant to
building freight cars.

Dave Evans


Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Dave Evans writes:

"With all of the discussion I have lost track - your conductor book is
UP main in WY post war?"

April 1949.

"Sorry if this is getting too far off topic. Being a relative newcomer,
should this type of info be on the Opsig group? Not that relevant to
building freight cars."

The STMFC's scope include's many aspects of frt cars other than their construction...including their operation. From the STMFC rules:

"The objectives
include the sharing of
information about North American, standard gauge railroad freight cars
including their operation,
distribution and the various techniques of building
models of them. Discussions about the cargos of freight cars are permitted
but only as they are directly associated with a freight car. Emphasis is to
be placed on the study of the prototype with
a goal of producing models of them with as great a degree of accuracy as
possible."

As far as the Opsig group is concerned, that's up to you and that group. I have nothing to do with it.

Mike Brock


devansprr
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

Incidentally, I note that two of the 35 trains in my frt conductor's
book
contain a few Sinclair tank cars. One with 59 [ 63% ] and one with 52 [
42% ]. Based on max train lengths of 35 cars, that means I will need
22 SDRX
tank cars. I have [ gasp ] 5.
Something tells me...

Mike Brock
Mike,

With all of the discussion I have lost track - your conductor book is
UP main in WY post war?

Modeling WWII I'm trying to keep track of which would be the likely
reporting marks on tank trains that ran over the PRR in the east.

Plus, I was under the impression that during this era that a lot of
the refining was north of the gulf - closer to Oklahoma, northern TX,
Kansas, and even eastern Colorado? Gulf coast refining flourished
later after drilling started in the gulf??

Bruce, don't forget that one of the key WWII refineries was Sun oil's
high-octane av-gas refinery in Marcus Hook, PA (between Wilmington DE
and Philly) - I think the crude came over tunnel hill, then down
through Columbia to the DC-Philly main, and then ran north through
Wilmington. Sun's hi-octane fuel was thought to be a major technical
breakthrough in suporting high altitude, super-charged aircraft. I
think I've seen at least one picture of such a train near Wilmington
in an old High Line. What I do not know is if the finished product was
loaded onto ships at Marcus Hook (on the Delaware), or moved by rail
up to the NYC port area.

Sorry if this is getting too far off topic. Being a relative newcomer,
should this type of info be on the Opsig group? Not that relevant to
building freight cars.

Dave Evans