The best lighting for kit-building.


Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Continuing a pleasant custom, I have been building resin kits at our summer home. I used to build them on the porch (a la Bill Darnaby), but the afternoon zephyrs prevailing in this country eventually caused me to retire to a cozy corner.

A continuing problem that increasingly plagues my modeling is poor lighting- lighting that no matter how bright creates blinding shadows and stark contrasts that commonly stretches 5 minute tasks into maddening and quite tedious marathons.

I ask the good kit builders on this list what ideal portable shadowless lighting, or lighting arrangements that they are finding ideal for their kit building work stations? Keep in mind that older eyes require higher light levels, and they are unable to accommodate to light level changes very well.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA


jerryglow2
 

I used to host a small group of modelers to meet at my shop, go out
to dinner, then come back to build our own models at "work stations"
around the room. One of them brought his own Ott light in a briefcase
and set it up for himself. I believe these are available commercially
and the bulb itself from Champ Decals.

Jerry Glow

&#92;--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Denny Anspach <danspach@...> wrote:

Continuing a pleasant custom, I have been building resin kits at
our
summer home. I used to build them on the porch (a la Bill
Darnaby),
but the afternoon zephyrs prevailing in this country eventually
caused
me to retire to a cozy corner.

A continuing problem that increasingly plagues my modeling is
poor
lighting- lighting that no matter how bright creates blinding
shadows
and stark contrasts that commonly stretches 5 minute tasks into
maddening and quite tedious marathons.

I ask the good kit builders on this list what ideal portable
shadowless lighting, or lighting arrangements that they are
finding
ideal for their kit building work stations? Keep in mind that
older
eyes require higher light levels, and they are unable to
accommodate
to light level changes very well.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA


Raymond Young
 

Jerry,

For my aging eyes (79), an Ott light is not enough.  I have found that a 100 watt quartz light on a parallelogram extension works much better.  It also allows me to extend the light to cover the floor to find those tiny parts that escape attachment.  Heat is generated, but the light should be turned off when not needed.

A large desk-mounted magnifying glass supplements my Opti-Visor for close-up work.

Virgil Young
Amarillo, TX

----- Original Message ----
From: jerryglow2 <jerryglow@comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, September 22, 2008 8:17:18 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: The best lighting for kit-building.


I used to host a small group of modelers to meet at my shop, go out
to dinner, then come back to build our own models at "work stations"
around the room. One of them brought his own Ott light in a briefcase
and set it up for himself. I believe these are available commercially
and the bulb itself from Champ Decals.

Jerry Glow

&#92;--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, Denny Anspach <danspach@.. .> wrote:

Continuing a pleasant custom, I have been building resin kits at
our
summer home. I used to build them on the porch (a la Bill
Darnaby),
but the afternoon zephyrs prevailing in this country eventually
caused
me to retire to a cozy corner.

A continuing problem that increasingly plagues my modeling is
poor
lighting- lighting that no matter how bright creates blinding
shadows
and stark contrasts that commonly stretches 5 minute tasks into
maddening and quite tedious marathons.

I ask the good kit builders on this list what ideal portable
shadowless lighting, or lighting arrangements that they are
finding
ideal for their kit building work stations? Keep in mind that
older
eyes require higher light levels, and they are unable to
accommodate
to light level changes very well.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Manfred Lorenz
 

Ott-Lights are, I believe, fluorescent lamps. These have the
advantage of spreading the emitted light over a larger surface. Which
is good for the eyes too. For enlargement needing deteil work with a
loupe or so I use a flexible lamp with a 60 Watt bulb that I can pull
down to the work. There are large loupes with lights included which I
have but have not put up yet.

To simulate this effect outdoors why not put up a natural (not white)
canvas sail across the porch. That would tone down the brightness of
the sun and distribute it more evenly. Also a good protection against
sunburn, methinks.

Manfred

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "jerryglow2" <jerryglow@...> wrote:

I used to host a small group of modelers to meet at my shop, go out
to dinner, then come back to build our own models at "work
stations"
around the room. One of them brought his own Ott light in a
briefcase
and set it up for himself. I believe these are available
commercially
and the bulb itself from Champ Decals.

Jerry Glow

&#92;--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Denny Anspach <danspach@> wrote:

Continuing a pleasant custom, I have been building resin kits at
our
summer home. I used to build them on the porch (a la Bill
Darnaby),
but the afternoon zephyrs prevailing in this country eventually
caused
me to retire to a cozy corner.

A continuing problem that increasingly plagues my modeling is
poor
lighting- lighting that no matter how bright creates blinding
shadows
and stark contrasts that commonly stretches 5 minute tasks into
maddening and quite tedious marathons.

I ask the good kit builders on this list what ideal portable
shadowless lighting, or lighting arrangements that they are
finding
ideal for their kit building work stations? Keep in mind that
older
eyes require higher light levels, and they are unable to
accommodate
to light level changes very well.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA


Tim O'Connor
 

Ott lights are just full-spectrum bulbs. I have one too, a small flip-open
desk light. Such bulbs are easy to find nowadays for almost any ordinary
flourescent fixture. I prefer 'indoor' flourescents that skew the light more
towards the red end of the spectrum.

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: "jerryglow2" <jerryglow@comcast.net>
I used to host a small group of modelers to meet at my shop, go out
to dinner, then come back to build our own models at "work stations"
around the room. One of them brought his own Ott light in a briefcase
and set it up for himself. I believe these are available commercially
and the bulb itself from Champ Decals.

Jerry Glow


Tim O'Connor
 

Denny

I don't know how "portable" you want, but I use swing-arm lights that
clamp to my work table. These are 200w Halogens with a low-hi mode
switch. I also have a magnifier light that takes a compact flourescent
(don't want to burn myself getting that close). Neither one cost much,
I think I got them both at Staples. The Halogens are quite tall, so the
top of my head doesn't get cooked...

Tim O'

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: Denny Anspach <danspach@macnexus.org>

I ask the good kit builders on this list what ideal portable
shadowless lighting, or lighting arrangements that they are finding
ideal for their kit building work stations? Keep in mind that older
eyes require higher light levels, and they are unable to accommodate
to light level changes very well.

Denny


Jared Harper <harper-brown@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Raymond Young <rayvirg@...> wrote:
A large desk-mounted magnifying glass supplements my Opti-Visor for
close-up work.


Without my Optivisor I would have to give up model railroading.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Douglas Harding <dharding@...>
 

Denny, I also have one of the Ott-Lite, the one on the swing arm, it works great. I also have on my work bench two regular swing
arm lamp fixtures with "DayLight" brand curly bulbs that screw into a regular socket. Daylight is a brand from England that emits
a wonderful light similar to the Ott-Lite brand. They are available at Hobby Lobby, in the sewing section. While at Hobby Lobby,
in the same sewing section, look for Mag-Eyes - a magnifying device that is similar to an Opti-visior, but does not have the
"visor" effect. You can look up and over the Mag-Eyes to look at plans, the tool box, etc.

If you are still at Okoboji, come on over and I will show you what I used, down in my dark basement where there is no natural
lighting.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I use a swing-arm fixture with a 13w compact flourescent lamp screwed
into it. The compact flourescent "bulb" gives off a lot less heat
than a standard light bulb.

So far, at the age of 48, I'm lucky enough not to need anything
brighter, but higher-wattage compact flourescents are readily
available.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, timboconnor@... wrote:

Denny

I don't know how "portable" you want, but I use swing-arm lights
that
clamp to my work table. These are 200w Halogens with a low-hi mode
switch. I also have a magnifier light that takes a compact
flourescent
(don't want to burn myself getting that close). Neither one cost
much,
I think I got them both at Staples. The Halogens are quite tall, so
the
top of my head doesn't get cooked...

Tim O'

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: Denny Anspach <danspach@...>

I ask the good kit builders on this list what ideal portable
shadowless lighting, or lighting arrangements that they are
finding
ideal for their kit building work stations? Keep in mind that
older
eyes require higher light levels, and they are unable to
accommodate
to light level changes very well.

Denny


lnnrr <lnnrr@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Denny Anspach <danspach@...> wrote:
Denny, I use a clamp-on magnifying lamp of the sort that has
a circular fluorescent blub around the lens. As nearly shadow-free
as you can ask. A 60W halogen stands off to one side for those
extra-bright moments and sometimes I use it as a side-light under
the main lens. Both came from a sewing store.
I find that at my post-retirement age, a goodly amount of general
room lights is also needful. Otherwise when I need to look away from
the workbench, I waste time waiting for eyes to adjust.
I also have a special set of workbench glasses, apart from my regular
reading glasses. The workbench glasses are the same prescription
on top as my reading glasses are on the bottom. The lower part of
the workbench glasses are extra close focus. Not to replace
Opti-visors, but just to get closer than my readers allow. Like
checking to make sure your airline anglecock brackets are properly
bolted in place. (GRIN)
Chuck Peck
A continuing problem that increasingly plagues my modeling is
poor
lighting- lighting that no matter how bright creates blinding
shadows
and stark contrasts that commonly stretches 5 minute tasks into
maddening and quite tedious marathons.

I ask the good kit builders on this list what ideal portable
shadowless lighting, or lighting arrangements that they are
finding
ideal for their kit building work stations? Keep in mind that
older
eyes require higher light levels, and they are unable to
accommodate
to light level changes very well.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA