"Different" flat load


Dick
 

Don't know if the loads were for trestle bends or not.

HOWEVER, with a load that stretches across 3 flat cars (2nd load also), this
consist would be restricted to track with big radius curves. Knowing the
load is 120 foot long, we can almost assume that the flat cars are 50 footers.

I have seen restrictions up to 240 foot radius curves (23 deg) wether
coupled or not on special flat cars only 72 foot long. This consist may have had
even bigger restrictions and a dispatchers nightmare on selecting track
routes.

Dick Kashdin
Clarence, NY

In a message dated 9/28/2008 11:20:01 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
devans1@... writes:




While checking out the ice platform at monroe, I decided to browse the
other 400+ railroad pictures. Mostly tunnel construction along the GN
- amazing photos and a gold mine if you were modeling that line in the
late '20's early 30's. Lots of GN head-end power.

Not a lot of freight car pix, but this one caught my eye as something
I have never seen modeled. Everyone seems to be doing naval guns and
big structural steel as multi-car flat loads, but this is different:

_http://content.http://content.http://cohttp://contehttp://contenhttp://c&<WBR
CISOPTR&<WBR>CISO&<WBR>R_
(http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/pickett&CISOPTR=1385&CISOBOX=1&REC=20)

Hopefully the link works. If not, the neg number is Pickett 4473.

I wonder if these were for trestle bents?

Dave Evans







**************Looking for simple solutions to your real-life financial
challenges? Check out WalletPop for the latest news and information, tips and
calculators. (http://www.walletpop.com/?NCID=emlcntuswall00000001)


devansprr
 

While checking out the ice platform at monroe, I decided to browse the
other 400+ railroad pictures. Mostly tunnel construction along the GN
- amazing photos and a gold mine if you were modeling that line in the
late '20's early 30's. Lots of GN head-end power.

Not a lot of freight car pix, but this one caught my eye as something
I have never seen modeled. Everyone seems to be doing naval guns and
big structural steel as multi-car flat loads, but this is different:

http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/pickett&CISOPTR=1385&CISOBOX=1&REC=20

Hopefully the link works. If not, the neg number is Pickett 4473.

I wonder if these were for trestle bents?

Dave Evans


Charles Morrill
 

One wonders what the Ford Motor Co. was going to do with such logs in New Jersey? In 1929?
Charlie

----- Original Message -----




Not a lot of freight car pix, but this one caught my eye as something
I have never seen modeled. Everyone seems to be doing naval guns and
big structural steel as multi-car flat loads, but this is different:

http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/pickett&CISOPTR=1385&CISOBOX=1&REC=20

Hopefully the link works. If not, the neg number is Pickett 4473.

I wonder if these were for trestle bents?

Dave Evans


Steve Stull
 

--- On Sun, 9/28/08, devansprr <devans1@...> wrote:From: devansprr <devans1@...>Subject: [STMFC] "Different" flat loadTo: STMFC@...: Sunday, September 28, 2008, 8:19 AMhttp://content. lib.washington. edu/cdm4/ item_viewer. php?CISOROOT= /pickett& CISOPTR=1385& CISOBOX=1& REC=20 Hopefully the link works. If not, the neg number is Pickett 4473. I wonder if these were for trestle bents? Dave EvansHi Dave;Caption of the photo says they are 120' pilings going to a Ford Motor Plant in New Jersey.Neat photos on that site.Steve M Stull




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


SaltNPepper WhoKnows <saltnpepper69@...>
 

The reason we never see this kind of a load modeled is because
the tightness of our curves compared to the prototype don't allow the overhang.

It would make a neat model for a very large club layout, but even there my
guess is, it would have to be static.

I am betting that these loads were troublesome to the real railroads too..... :-)

Loren Martell



To: STMFC@...: badlands@...: Sun, 28 Sep 2008 11:00:44 -0500Subject: Re: [STMFC] "Different" flat load

One wonders what the Ford Motor Co. was going to do with such logs in New Jersey? In 1929?Charlie----- Original Message ----- >> Not a lot of freight car pix, but this one caught my eye as something> I have never seen modeled. Everyone seems to be doing naval guns and> big structural steel as multi-car flat loads, but this is different:>> http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/pickett&CISOPTR=1385&CISOBOX=1&REC=20>> Hopefully the link works. If not, the neg number is Pickett 4473.>> I wonder if these were for trestle bents?>> Dave Evans>





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Steve Stull
 

--- On Sun, 9/28/08, Charles Morrill <badlands@...> wrote:From: Charles Morrill <badlands@...>Subject: Re: [STMFC] "Different" flat loadTo: STMFC@...: Sunday, September 28, 2008, 9:00 AMOne wonders what the Ford Motor Co. was going to do with such logs in New Jersey? In 1929? CharlieHi Charlie;Perhaps they were column pilings for a new facility being built.Steve M Stull




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Robert kirkham
 

That's interesting. I've seen similar loads also destined for Ford Motor Co. on the CPR and GNR, both near Vancouver, B.C. They must have been buying everywhere. See related photos at the Vancouver Public Library site: <http://www3.vpl.vancouver.bc.ca/spe/histphotos/photos-search.htm> and search for 3692, 5941, 5941A, 4098, 4098A, 4098C. Now that kind of buying surge would surely skew your freight car distribution in New Jersey or Eastern USA wouldn't it! (personally, while the captions mention New Jersey, I could see those being a reference to the head office, and the actual destination could be the Rouge Plant or some other behemoth - can't recall when those were built.

Rob Kirkham

--------------------------------------------------
From: "devansprr" <devans1@...>
Sent: Sunday, September 28, 2008 8:19 AM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] "Different" flat load

While checking out the ice platform at monroe, I decided to browse the
other 400+ railroad pictures. Mostly tunnel construction along the GN
- amazing photos and a gold mine if you were modeling that line in the
late '20's early 30's. Lots of GN head-end power.

Not a lot of freight car pix, but this one caught my eye as something
I have never seen modeled. Everyone seems to be doing naval guns and
big structural steel as multi-car flat loads, but this is different:

http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/pickett&CISOPTR=1385&CISOBOX=1&REC=20

Hopefully the link works. If not, the neg number is Pickett 4473.

I wonder if these were for trestle bents?

Dave Evans




------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

They are labeled "pilings" so a guess would be that they were building something on soft ground in New Jersey.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Charles Morrill

One wonders what the Ford Motor Co. was going to do with such logs in New
Jersey? In 1929?


rfederle@...
 

Pilings can be used for trestle work AND piers. Perhaps Ford was building or adding to a pier for shipping products.

Robert Federl
---- Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...> wrote:

They are labeled "pilings" so a guess would be that they were building
something on soft ground in New Jersey.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Charles Morrill

One wonders what the Ford Motor Co. was going to do with such logs in New
Jersey? In 1929?


Don Worthy
 

Hey, that may not have been that unusual. I have a film clip with a load like that on the Central of Georgia Railway around 1955. The only difference is that the Central's load looks like the poles were de-barked and were creosoted.
One of the fellow model railroaders in Gordon, Ga., has modeled it. Darn thing looks good and goes though 28" curves with no trouble.
 
Thanks for the photo
Don Worthy
Ivey, Ga.

--- On Sun, 9/28/08, devansprr <devans1@...> wrote:

From: devansprr <devans1@...>
Subject: [STMFC] "Different" flat load
To: STMFC@...
Date: Sunday, September 28, 2008, 11:19 AM






While checking out the ice platform at monroe, I decided to browse the
other 400+ railroad pictures. Mostly tunnel construction along the GN
- amazing photos and a gold mine if you were modeling that line in the
late '20's early 30's. Lots of GN head-end power.

Not a lot of freight car pix, but this one caught my eye as something
I have never seen modeled. Everyone seems to be doing naval guns and
big structural steel as multi-car flat loads, but this is different:

http://content. lib.washington. edu/cdm4/ item_viewer. php?CISOROOT= /pickett& CISOPTR=1385& CISOBOX=1& REC=20

Hopefully the link works. If not, the neg number is Pickett 4473.

I wonder if these were for trestle bents?

Dave Evans


gary laakso
 

These are the 41 foot NP flats that W&R just imported in the 69000-69999 series. They have two trussrods inside their fish sills and were built in 1903 by Standard Steel Car Co.

gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
vasa0vasa@...

----- Original Message -----
From:
To: STMFC@...
Sent: 9/28/2008 12:20:46 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] "Different" flat load


Don't know if the loads were for trestle bends or not.

HOWEVER, with a load that stretches across 3 flat cars (2nd load also), this
consist would be restricted to track with big radius curves. Knowing the
load is 120 foot long, we can almost assume that the flat cars are 50 footers.

I have seen restrictions up to 240 foot radius curves (23 deg) wether
coupled or not on special flat cars only 72 foot long. This consist may have had
even bigger restrictions and a dispatchers nightmare on selecting track
routes.

Dick Kashdin
Clarence, NY


In a message dated 9/28/2008 11:20:01 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
devans1@... writes:

While checking out the ice platform at monroe, I decided to browse the
other 400+ railroad pictures. Mostly tunnel construction along the GN
- amazing photos and a gold mine if you were modeling that line in the
late '20's early 30's. Lots of GN head-end power.

Not a lot of freight car pix, but this one caught my eye as something
I have never seen modeled. Everyone seems to be doing naval guns and
big structural steel as multi-car flat loads, but this is different:

_http://content.http://content.http://cohttp://contehttp://contenhttp://c&<WBR
CISOPTR&<WBR>CISO&<WBR>R_
(http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/pickett&CISOPTR=1385&CISOBOX=1&REC=20)

Hopefully the link works. If not, the neg number is Pickett 4473.

I wonder if these were for trestle bents?

Dave Evans

**************Looking for simple solutions to your real-life financial
challenges? Check out WalletPop for the latest news and information, tips and
calculators. (http://www.walletpop.com/?NCID=emlcntuswall00000001)


al_brown03
 

Quoting Mohowski's book on the NYS&W, p 60: "Ford Motor Company
constructed an assembly plant in 1929 at Edgewater[, N.J.] ... . The
factory was second in importance only to that at Dearborn, Michigan.
Vehicles could be loaded directly onto deep draft vessels for
shipment to domestic and foreign ports." The plant is pictured in
Krause and Crist, "Susquehanna", p 24; I would guess the pilings were
for a pier.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@..., <rfederle@...> wrote:

Pilings can be used for trestle work AND piers. Perhaps Ford was
building or adding to a pier for shipping products.

Robert Federl
---- Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...> wrote:
They are labeled "pilings" so a guess would be that they were
building
something on soft ground in New Jersey.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Charles Morrill

One wonders what the Ford Motor Co. was going to do with such
logs in New
Jersey? In 1929?


Tim O'Connor
 

Dave

It says they're headed to Ford Motor Co in New Jersey. I wonder
if they are intended for aircraft spars, since at that time Ford
was in the airplane business...

Tim O'Connor

While checking out the ice platform at monroe, I decided to browse the
other 400+ railroad pictures. Mostly tunnel construction along the GN
- amazing photos and a gold mine if you were modeling that line in the
late '20's early 30's. Lots of GN head-end power.

Not a lot of freight car pix, but this one caught my eye as something
I have never seen modeled. Everyone seems to be doing naval guns and
big structural steel as multi-car flat loads, but this is different:

http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/pickett&CISOPTR=1385&CISOBOX=1&REC=20

Hopefully the link works. If not, the neg number is Pickett 4473.

I wonder if these were for trestle bents?

Dave Evans


benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
"It says they're headed to Ford Motor Co in New Jersey. I wonder
if they are intended for aircraft spars, since at that time Ford
was in the airplane business..."

Negative. All of the Ford aircraft were all-metal designs.
http://www.fordtrimotor.org/vars.php?p=n7
http://www.fordtri-motor.com/


Ben Hom


mcindoefalls
 

--- In STMFC@..., "al_brown03" <abrown@...> wrote:

"Ford Motor Company
constructed an assembly plant in 1929 at Edgewater[, N.J.] . . .
Vehicles could be loaded directly onto deep draft vessels for
shipment to domestic and foreign ports." . . . I would guess the
pilings were for a pier.

Possibly, but the Edgewater plant was built on filled-in tidal flats
adjacent to the Hudson River. When erecting a large structure on such
a site, pilings would be driven down to bedrock to provide firm
support for the building.

Walt Lankenau


Jack Mullen
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Charles Morrill" <badlands@...> wrote:

One wonders what the Ford Motor Co. was going to do with such logs
in New
Jersey? In 1929?
Charlie
It's a load of piling, which could be destined for use in a foundation
or a pier.
Jack Mullen


Ron Smith <rpsmith@...>
 

There were Huge Logs shipped by Rail, to Glacier Park on the GN, for the Uprights of the Glacier Park Hotel. They had to arrive with the Bark intact. There is quite a display on this, in the GN Glacier Park Hotel, lots of Photos. The Hotel is a true Marvel.
Ron Smith
Carman UPRR

----- Original Message -----
From: Rob Kirkham
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, September 28, 2008 9:13 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] "Different" flat load


That's interesting. I've seen similar loads also destined for Ford Motor
Co. on the CPR and GNR, both near Vancouver, B.C. They must have been
buying everywhere. See related photos at the Vancouver Public Library site:
<http://www3.vpl.vancouver.bc.ca/spe/histphotos/photos-search.htm> and
search for 3692, 5941, 5941A, 4098, 4098A, 4098C. Now that kind of buying
surge would surely skew your freight car distribution in New Jersey or
Eastern USA wouldn't it! (personally, while the captions mention New
Jersey, I could see those being a reference to the head office, and the
actual destination could be the Rouge Plant or some other behemoth - can't
recall when those were built.

Rob Kirkham

--------------------------------------------------
From: "devansprr" <devans1@...>
Sent: Sunday, September 28, 2008 8:19 AM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] "Different" flat load

> While checking out the ice platform at monroe, I decided to browse the
> other 400+ railroad pictures. Mostly tunnel construction along the GN
> - amazing photos and a gold mine if you were modeling that line in the
> late '20's early 30's. Lots of GN head-end power.
>
> Not a lot of freight car pix, but this one caught my eye as something
> I have never seen modeled. Everyone seems to be doing naval guns and
> big structural steel as multi-car flat loads, but this is different:
>
> http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/pickett&CISOPTR=1385&CISOBOX=1&REC=20
>
> Hopefully the link works. If not, the neg number is Pickett 4473.
>
> I wonder if these were for trestle bents?
>
> Dave Evans
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>


rfederle@...
 

Clearances would be the biggest issue. As long as a set uf "Bunk" pivot and the other adjacent "bunk" wouldd slide slightly should negotiate turns OK.

Robert Federle
---- Don Worthy <don_worthy@...> wrote:

Hey, that may not have been that unusual. I have a film clip with a load like that on the Central of Georgia Railway around 1955. The only difference is that the Central's load looks like the poles were de-barked and were creosoted.
One of the fellow model railroaders in Gordon, Ga., has modeled it. Darn thing looks good and goes though 28" curves with no trouble.
 
Thanks for the photo
Don Worthy
Ivey, Ga.

--- On Sun, 9/28/08, devansprr <devans1@...> wrote:

From: devansprr <devans1@...>
Subject: [STMFC] "Different" flat load
To: STMFC@...
Date: Sunday, September 28, 2008, 11:19 AM






While checking out the ice platform at monroe, I decided to browse the
other 400+ railroad pictures. Mostly tunnel construction along the GN
- amazing photos and a gold mine if you were modeling that line in the
late '20's early 30's. Lots of GN head-end power.

Not a lot of freight car pix, but this one caught my eye as something
I have never seen modeled. Everyone seems to be doing naval guns and
big structural steel as multi-car flat loads, but this is different:

http://content. lib.washington. edu/cdm4/ item_viewer. php?CISOROOT= /pickett& CISOPTR=1385& CISOBOX=1& REC=20

Hopefully the link works. If not, the neg number is Pickett 4473.

I wonder if these were for trestle bents?

Dave Evans


















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


rfederle@...
 

Wow...I need to watch where my fingers go on that keyboard.

Sorry about the spelling.

Robert Federle
---- rfederle@... wrote:

Clearances would be the biggest issue. As long as a set uf "Bunk" pivot and the other adjacent "bunk" wouldd slide slightly should negotiate turns OK.

Robert Federle
---- Don Worthy <don_worthy@...> wrote:
Hey, that may not have been that unusual. I have a film clip with a load like that on the Central of Georgia Railway around 1955. The only difference is that the Central's load looks like the poles were de-barked and were creosoted.
One of the fellow model railroaders in Gordon, Ga., has modeled it. Darn thing looks good and goes though 28" curves with no trouble.
 
Thanks for the photo
Don Worthy
Ivey, Ga.

--- On Sun, 9/28/08, devansprr <devans1@...> wrote:

From: devansprr <devans1@...>
Subject: [STMFC] "Different" flat load
To: STMFC@...
Date: Sunday, September 28, 2008, 11:19 AM






While checking out the ice platform at monroe, I decided to browse the
other 400+ railroad pictures. Mostly tunnel construction along the GN
- amazing photos and a gold mine if you were modeling that line in the
late '20's early 30's. Lots of GN head-end power.

Not a lot of freight car pix, but this one caught my eye as something
I have never seen modeled. Everyone seems to be doing naval guns and
big structural steel as multi-car flat loads, but this is different:

http://content. lib.washington. edu/cdm4/ item_viewer. php?CISOROOT= /pickett& CISOPTR=1385& CISOBOX=1& REC=20

Hopefully the link works. If not, the neg number is Pickett 4473.

I wonder if these were for trestle bents?

Dave Evans


















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Charles Morrill" <badlands@...> asked:
One wonders what the Ford Motor Co. was going to do with such logs in
New
Jersey? In 1929?
At one time Ford had a plant in Edgewater, NJ which was located on the
Hudson River. Maybe they used those logs as pilings.

Ed