California Despatch Line-Roma Wine reefer


rdietrichson
 

Hey all,
I'm trying to build a model of the subject car using the Clover House
dry transfer set In the car construction notes it says the car had
wood sheathed sides and ends, but makes no mention of the type of roof
this car had. The same instruction notes that the car had a steel
underbody,
but does not tell if it was a straight frame or fishbelly. This
lettering set dates from the 30's, but how long did it last? Any help
with these questions or photos of prototype cars would be greatly
appreciated.
Rick Dietrichson
Wilmington, NC


Tim O'Connor
 

Rick

Building it... how? Do you have a photo, or drawings? I ask because
this was one of the schemes Red Caboose put out for their R-30-12
non-ice (bunkerless) reefers, but I somehow doubt those were really
prototypical...

Tim O'Connor

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: "rdietrichson" <Rdietrichson@ec.rr.com>
Hey all,
I'm trying to build a model of the subject car using the Clover House
dry transfer set In the car construction notes it says the car had
wood sheathed sides and ends, but makes no mention of the type of roof
this car had. The same instruction notes that the car had a steel
underbody,
but does not tell if it was a straight frame or fishbelly. This
lettering set dates from the 30's, but how long did it last? Any help
with these questions or photos of prototype cars would be greatly
appreciated.
Rick Dietrichson
Wilmington, NC


rdietrichson
 

Tim,
That's the $64 question! I model in N scale so potentially I could start with a MicroTrains wood sheathed 40' reefer, and use either a straight or fishbelly underframe, but I don't have a clue as to what type of roof the car had. The MicroTrains car has a wood sheathed roof, with ice hatches that can be removed.
Rick

----- Original Message -----
From: timboconnor@comcast.net
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, October 07, 2008 12:51 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] California Despatch Line-Roma Wine reefer


Rick

Building it... how? Do you have a photo, or drawings? I ask because
this was one of the schemes Red Caboose put out for their R-30-12
non-ice (bunkerless) reefers, but I somehow doubt those were really
prototypical...

Tim O'Connor

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: "rdietrichson" <Rdietrichson@ec.rr.com>
> Hey all,
> I'm trying to build a model of the subject car using the Clover House
> dry transfer set In the car construction notes it says the car had
> wood sheathed sides and ends, but makes no mention of the type of roof
> this car had. The same instruction notes that the car had a steel
> underbody,
> but does not tell if it was a straight frame or fishbelly. This
> lettering set dates from the 30's, but how long did it last? Any help
> with these questions or photos of prototype cars would be greatly
> appreciated.
> Rick Dietrichson
> Wilmington, NC


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Rick Dietrichson wrote:
I'm trying to build a model of the subject car using the Clover House dry transfer set In the car construction notes it says the car had wood sheathed sides and ends, but makes no mention of the type of roof this car had. The same instruction notes that the car had a steel underbody, but does not tell if it was a straight frame or fishbelly.
Most of the 41 cars CDLX bought from PFE were R-30-5 and -6 cars, which had wood roofs. Their underframes were straight center sills with only the slightest deepening in the center, FAR from what modelers call "fishbelly" design. There is a drawing of the R-30-6 design on page 82 of the PFE book. CDLX did buy a few later cars from PFE also.

This lettering set dates from the 30's, but how long did it last? Any help with these questions or photos of prototype cars would be greatly appreciated.
As clearly and thoroughly documented in the new book, Billboard Refrigerator Cars, these fancy schemes were first outlawed from being applied in 1934 and existing ones could not be interchanged after 1937.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
. . . this was one of the schemes Red Caboose put out for their R-30-12 non-ice (bunkerless) reefers, but I somehow doubt those were really prototypical...
The Red Caboose schemes were based on actual cars discovered in the Sierra, as we have discussed a couple of times on this list.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


coronadoscalemodels
 

For anyone interested, one of the California Despatch ex-PFE reefers,
(class R-30-5)that was converted to a Roma Wine car, is now at
Railtown, in Jamestown, Calif, on the Sierra RR. In 1933-35, 41 cars
went to the CDLX (#277-317) for wine service, ice bunks removed, 6
tanks with roof filler hatches installed, and leased and lettered for
different wineries.. The car at Jamestown is ex-Pickering Lbr. Co.
MW24, who bought the car from CDLX at an unknown date. After donation
to the Sierra, the reefer doors were replaced by boxcar doors for movie
work. The car has 6 roof hatches spaced along one side of the roof
only, now covered on the outside by roof sheathing. (All this
informaiton from Kyle Wyatt, of the Calif. State RR Museum). None is
this is shown in the new billboard reefer book, which gives the
impression that billboard reefers were rarely seen in the West. But
then, a wine car isn't a reefer anymore anyway.

Stan Schwedler


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Rick Dietrichson wrote:
That's the $64 question! I model in N scale so potentially I could start with a MicroTrains wood sheathed 40' reefer, and use either a straight or fishbelly underframe, but I don't have a clue as to what type of roof the car had. The MicroTrains car has a wood sheathed roof, with ice hatches that can be removed.
Perfect! The ice bunkers were removed, but not always the hatches (in fact, more hatches were sometimes added along the roof to fill the glass-lined tanks inside).

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Tim O'Connor
 

Tony

I simply meant the R-30-12 was not appropriate. As someone
pointed out, the prototype was a rebuilt R-30-5, a different car.

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@signaturepress.com>
Tim O'Connor wrote:
. . . this was one of the schemes Red Caboose put out for their
R-30-12 non-ice (bunkerless) reefers, but I somehow doubt those were
really prototypical...
The Red Caboose schemes were based on actual cars discovered in
the Sierra, as we have discussed a couple of times on this list.

Tony Thompson


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
I simply meant the R-30-12 was not appropriate. As someone pointed out, the prototype was a rebuilt R-30-5, a different car.
Yes, you're correct, and I was among those pointing out the right class.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history