Cudahy meat reefers


Jerry <jrs060@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Douglas Harding" <dharding@...> wrote:
Garth, PHP is railroad talk for "Packing House Products" and could mean anything
coming out of a packing house, which we more
commonly think of as a slaughter house. The "packing" term comes from early meat
processors packing their products in barrels for
shipment. And the "Uncle Sam" moniker came from an early meat packer (1818 I think)
who stamped barrels of meat destined for the
army "US".

PHP could be hanging meat carcasses, cans of lard or hams. It could be bacon or boxed
meat. It possibly even refers to the various
by-products as well.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org
Doug, the term PHP comes from the STCC (Standard Transportation Commodity
Codes) or "Stick Code", as we used to call them, daily report sheets. All the STCC on the
waybills were grouped into numerical categories on the daily report, and all you had
to do was tally the loading into the appropriate grouping according to it's number code.
You see you had to keep track of carloadings and report it daily, and almost all the
Packing House Products fell into this one category. Railroaders just got into the habit
of abbreviating everything that came out of a packer as PHP, and this is how it became
so common on list and teletype reports.

Happiness, Jerry Stewart

Woodstock, Illinois


Jerry <jrs060@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Douglas Harding" <dharding@...> wrote

" We all would have been better served if Atlas had chosen the General American car or
another builder who supplied cars to many meat packer car fleets. "

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org

Boy Doug, I'll second that one! The cars that the General American wood car division
built and leased to numerous packers would be the best choice for a plastic kit
manufacture wanting to do a meat reefer. I know a bunch of people that would also be
interested in see this one done including myself. Many colorful logos as will as
different packers are appropriate for the car.

Happiness, Jerry Stewart

Woodstock, Illinois


Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Schuyler,

The quote is exactly as it is on the page. I assumed "No." meant "north". It seem obvious to me, so I didn't comment.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:


-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC Garth G. Groff

Cudahy Packing Co. is listed as "No. Salt Lake (Not in S.L. Switching
Yard Limit)".
Garth, unless you typo'd a period instead of a t, I'm suggesting here that "No." means North, as in
North Salt Lake. Or does that not make sense?

SGL




Douglas Harding <dharding@...>
 

Garth, PHP is railroad talk for "Packing House Products" and could mean anything coming out of a packing house, which we more
commonly think of as a slaughter house. The "packing" term comes from early meat processors packing their products in barrels for
shipment. And the "Uncle Sam" moniker came from an early meat packer (1818 I think) who stamped barrels of meat destined for the
army "US".

PHP could be hanging meat carcasses, cans of lard or hams. It could be bacon or boxed meat. It possibly even refers to the various
by-products as well.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Schuyler Larrabee
 

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC Garth G. Groff

Cudahy Packing Co. is listed as "No. Salt Lake (Not in S.L. Switching
Yard Limit)".
Garth, unless you typo'd a period instead of a t, I'm suggesting here that "No." means North, as in
North Salt Lake. Or does that not make sense?

SGL


Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Richard,

Excellent! I'm sure you are right. Some entries for similar destinations in the list use "meat products". Probably depended on who typed up the entries. Fuel dealers have the same sort of inconsistency with "pet. products" or "gas and oil".

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

richtownsend@netscape.net wrote:

"PHP" likely means packing house products.


Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


Richard Townsend
 

"PHP" likely means packing house products.


Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Storzek" <destorzek@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Brian J Carlson" <brian@> wrote:

Patrick Cudahy reefers were leased from NRC. I didn't see the photo
in the
NRC section that Dennis mentioned but maybe he was talking about the
Billboard Reefer book, which I do not own.

Do I have this correct?
Correct, although photos of the NRC cars with the Patrick Cudahy
banner herald have been published elsewhere. Note that this was used
before the company name was officially changed from Cudahy Brothers
Co. to Patrick Cudahy Co.; Patrick Cudahy was one of their brand names.

Dennis
Brian,

Just to add a bit more, If you have access to Classic Freight Cars,
Vol. 3 by John Henderson, there is a color photo of NMCX 2133 with the
Patrick Cudahy banner logo. NMCX was an additional reporting mark
assigned to Northern Refrigerator Line, Inc. according to the January
1958 ORER, this is a nominal 40' (41'-5")wood sheathed car with steel
roof and ends, last re-weighed CUD. 6-59, if I'm interpreting the
halftone dots correctly. Small letterinG to the left of the door
states PATRICK CUDAHY CO. LESSOR.

The B&W photo in the Hendrickson / Kaminski Is of NRC 2217, leased to
CUDAHY BROTHERS CO. last reweighed CUD. 4-36 Interestingly, the paint
scheme is exactly the same as the car photographed 23 years later, not
to say that the banner logos didn't disappear for a while after 1938.
I unfortunately do not have an earlier ORER with a listing for this
car; it must post-date the 1292 copy in the office. It appears in all
respects to be the same as the car with the 1956 re-weight.

Now for the kicker. The car with the 1959 re-weight only has two
hinges per door leaf.

Dennis


Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Dave and John,

I have Western Pacific Circular No. 167-E, a list of all shippers on the WP, SN, and TS, plus other roads where there might be local interchange. My copy is circa 1957.

Cudahy Packing Co. is listed as "No. Salt Lake (Not in S.L. Switching Yard Limit)". The commodity is abbreviated "PHP", but this not defined. The plant was jointly switched by the WP, "DRG", and UP. Its capacity was 9 cars.

Another Cudahy location is listed in San Francisco at 1423 Sansome Street. The commodity is again "PHP". The plant was on the tracks of the State Belt Railroad, and the track held just 2 cars.

Finally, there was a Cudahy plant listed in Oakland at 3rd and Alice Streets. Again "PHP". This facility was switched by the WP itself, and had a capacity of 1 car.

There are other meat companies which had their own reefers listed, including Swift and John Morrel..

Plenty of uses for meat reefers here.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff



Dave Nelson wrote:

John Hile wrote:


In the late 20's Cudahy is listed as having packing facilities in:
Fresno, Los Angeles, Oakland, San Bernardino, and San Francisco per
an ATSF Shipper's guide of the era.
In the steam era Cudahy's main slaughterhouse was in Salt Lake City and they
shipped beef and lamb sides to the west coast where the packing facilities
cut them up for deliveries to the local retail market. IIRC they also had
something in Denver but at this moment I do not recall if it was just
another packing house or a full slaughterhouse operation.

The Oakland packing house, and I think the one in San Francisco too, had
rail service provided by the WP.

Dave Nelson


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 7, 2008, at 5:26 AM, Donald B. Valentine wrote:

....Again,
however, does anyone know of an accurate source of decals (or dry
transfers) for such a car in the post WW II period? They do not have
to be for Cudahy, just a four hinge door car that can be made from
the Atlas model.






Clover House set 8916-1 for the Cudahy cars.


Richard Hendrickson


Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

By golly, Brian is correct. I could have looked at any number of
different ORERs in my collection and found exactly the information
Brian gives below. But I didn't. I wonder where I did get the bogus
information? Oh, I remember! Off the internet. Burned again!
Gene Green

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Brian J Carlson" <brian@...> wrote:

Ok, what I think I know based on the posts. Cudahy Reefers with CRLX
reporting marks were owned by the Cudahy Packing company of East
Chicago (In

(Gene Green added " ... also in 1950, 1951 and 1953.")

1957). The Sunshine kit 24.17 is for these cars.
Also, this means the intro paragraph on page 27 of Gene Green's
"Refrigerator Car Color Guide" from Morning Sun is incorrect since
he
attributes the CRLX reporting marks to Patrick Cudahy of Wisconsin.

Patrick Cudahy reefers were leased from NRC. I didn't see the photo
in the
NRC section that Dennis mentioned but maybe he was talking about the
Billboard Reefer book, which I do not own.

Do I have this correct?

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Roger Hinman <rhinman@...>
 

the four hinges per door was marketed as a URECO product in the
twenties and highlighted in a Railway Age ad for URECO as being used
on the recent rebuilding of the older MDT cars for ERDX
service. These same cars later went into private packer service with a
couple of examples in the Billboard book.

John Greene even found a picture of a standard MDT car built in 1923
rebuilt with the four hinge door( my guess is that was a repair)

The eight hinge design must have had issues since all the MDT cars
that used it were later rebuilt with six hinges in the 1920s; only the
Rutland and possibly a second hand user
kept the eight hinge cars after the 1920s.

Roger Hinman

On Dec 7, 2008, at 8:26 AM, Donald B. Valentine wrote:

Thanks for both of your very helpful responses Doug, and to
Richard and Dennis as well. Looks like I have another book to
purchase....after still another bookcase is purchased! While not
surprised that early reefers were tried with only four hinges per
door, it has always surprised me that someone would have reverted to
that practice AFTER 1900, by which time the obvious problems with
only four should have been well documented. Both the NYC and Rutland
(due to NYC control at the time) utilized MDT constructed reefers
that went the opposite way. These cars used EIGHT hinges per door
and, like the four hinge variety, are quite distictive because of it.
I don't have to have a Cudahy car but am interested in having a four
hinge car for the variety and simply wished to have it "right". Some
reworking is not beyond possibility to do so. I was not, however,
even aware that this item had been retooled to utilize working doors.
While I've always been a proponent of operable doors on HO scale box
cars we will have to see how they work out on a reefer. Again,
however, does anyone know of an accurate source of decals (or dry
transfers) for such a car in the post WW II period? They do not have
to be for Cudahy, just a four hinge door car that can be made from
the Atlas model.

I would certainly agree that Atlas could have picked a more common
meat reefer to model and also wish they had. While there are several
of Marty Lofton's "meat fleet" and the Red Caboose Mather cars on
hand there is still the issue of limtied time and trying to model the
whole railroad. Aw well, if I live to 110.......

Thanks again, Don Valentine

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Douglas Harding" <dharding@...> wrote,
in part:

Four hinges were not as odd as we think, they were found on many
reefers, esp in early years. Manufactures moved to the six hinge
design because it added security that a door would remain in place
if a hinge broke or failed, ie screws pulled out of rotted
wood, enroute.
SNIP

The Atlas model appears to be correct, for one prototype.
Unfortunately they choose a car apparently used by only one company,
than decided it needed operating doors and ice hatches like it's
larger O scale brethren. This lead to oversized hinges. I laid in
a stock of Grandt Line reefer hinges and intend to modify part of
my Atlas reefer fleet by gluing the doors shut and adding new
hinges, 3 per side. Atlas offered the car in a variety of paint
schemes, the schemes appear to be accurate, but none to my
knowledge were used on the Cudahy car, which is why I bought a
bunch of undecs. We all would have been better served if Atlas had
chosen the General American car or another builder who supplied
cars to many meat packer car fleets.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Thanks for both of your very helpful responses Doug, and to
Richard and Dennis as well. Looks like I have another book to
purchase....after still another bookcase is purchased! While not
surprised that early reefers were tried with only four hinges per
door, it has always surprised me that someone would have reverted to
that practice AFTER 1900, by which time the obvious problems with
only four should have been well documented. Both the NYC and Rutland
(due to NYC control at the time) utilized MDT constructed reefers
that went the opposite way. These cars used EIGHT hinges per door
and, like the four hinge variety, are quite distictive because of it.
I don't have to have a Cudahy car but am interested in having a four
hinge car for the variety and simply wished to have it "right". Some
reworking is not beyond possibility to do so. I was not, however,
even aware that this item had been retooled to utilize working doors.
While I've always been a proponent of operable doors on HO scale box
cars we will have to see how they work out on a reefer. Again,
however, does anyone know of an accurate source of decals (or dry
transfers) for such a car in the post WW II period? They do not have
to be for Cudahy, just a four hinge door car that can be made from
the Atlas model.

I would certainly agree that Atlas could have picked a more common
meat reefer to model and also wish they had. While there are several
of Marty Lofton's "meat fleet" and the Red Caboose Mather cars on
hand there is still the issue of limtied time and trying to model the
whole railroad. Aw well, if I live to 110.......

Thanks again, Don Valentine



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Douglas Harding" <dharding@...> wrote,
in part:

Four hinges were not as odd as we think, they were found on many
reefers, esp in early years. Manufactures moved to the six hinge
design because it added security that a door would remain in place
if a hinge broke or failed, ie screws pulled out of rotted
wood, enroute.
SNIP

The Atlas model appears to be correct, for one prototype.
Unfortunately they choose a car apparently used by only one company,
than decided it needed operating doors and ice hatches like it's
larger O scale brethren. This lead to oversized hinges. I laid in
a stock of Grandt Line reefer hinges and intend to modify part of
my Atlas reefer fleet by gluing the doors shut and adding new
hinges, 3 per side. Atlas offered the car in a variety of paint
schemes, the schemes appear to be accurate, but none to my
knowledge were used on the Cudahy car, which is why I bought a
bunch of undecs. We all would have been better served if Atlas had
chosen the General American car or another builder who supplied
cars to many meat packer car fleets.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 6, 2008, at 7:01 PM, Brian J Carlson wrote:

Ok, what I think I know based on the posts. Cudahy Reefers with CRLX
reporting marks were owned by the Cudahy Packing company of East
Chicago (In
1957). The Sunshine kit 24.17 is for these cars.
Also, this means the intro paragraph on page 27 of Gene Green's
"Refrigerator Car Color Guide" from Morning Sun is incorrect since he
attributes the CRLX reporting marks to Patrick Cudahy of Wisconsin.

Patrick Cudahy reefers were leased from NRC. I didn't see the photo
in the
NRC section that Dennis mentioned but maybe he was talking about the
Billboard Reefer book, which I do not own.

Do I have this correct?













Yes.

Richard Hendrickson


Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Brian J Carlson" <brian@...> wrote:

Patrick Cudahy reefers were leased from NRC. I didn't see the photo
in the
NRC section that Dennis mentioned but maybe he was talking about the
Billboard Reefer book, which I do not own.

Do I have this correct?
Correct, although photos of the NRC cars with the Patrick Cudahy
banner herald have been published elsewhere. Note that this was used
before the company name was officially changed from Cudahy Brothers
Co. to Patrick Cudahy Co.; Patrick Cudahy was one of their brand names.

Dennis


Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

Ok, what I think I know based on the posts. Cudahy Reefers with CRLX
reporting marks were owned by the Cudahy Packing company of East Chicago (In
1957). The Sunshine kit 24.17 is for these cars.
Also, this means the intro paragraph on page 27 of Gene Green's
"Refrigerator Car Color Guide" from Morning Sun is incorrect since he
attributes the CRLX reporting marks to Patrick Cudahy of Wisconsin.

Patrick Cudahy reefers were leased from NRC. I didn't see the photo in the
NRC section that Dennis mentioned but maybe he was talking about the
Billboard Reefer book, which I do not own.

Do I have this correct?

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Roger Hinman <rhinman@...>
 

They were definitely two separate companies although genetically
connected back in the nineteenth century. When I did my pitch on NRC
last year, my opening slide
was called "Cudahy Confusion" to explain this before anyone raised
their hand

Roger Hinman

On Dec 6, 2008, at 12:38 AM, Brian J Carlson wrote:

OK now I am confused. I thought the Sunshine meat reefer for Cudahy
was for
the Wisconsin meat packers. The CRLX cars were Cudahy Car Lines and
were
owned by the Cudahy packing Company in Wisconsin. These cars often
came east
on the NKP.
Are there two separate Cudahy meat packing companies? The emails
make is
sound like there were different corporations.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY
----- Original Message -----
From: "Anthony Thompson" <thompson@signaturepress.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, December 05, 2008 7:21 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Cudahy meat reefers

But remember there was also a Patrick Cudahy, Inc. (successor to
the Cudahy Brothers company) located in Wisconsin, also in the meat
business. Nearby today is the town of Cudahy, Wisconsin (those other
Cudahy people gave rise to the town of Cudahy, California).


Dave Nelson
 

Tok, so we have the history of Patrick Cudahy, now the other company --
Cudhay Packing of Omaha -- which has this history:

The Irish-born Cudahy brothers started working in the Milwaukee meat
business in the early 1860s; there they met Philip Armour, whom they
followed to Chicago during the 1870s. In the years that followed, the
Cudahys operated small packing plants in Chicago. In 1887, with Armour's
backing, Michael Cudahy and his brothers started an Armour-Cudahy packing
plant in Omaha, Nebraska. The Cudahy Packing Co. was created in 1890, when
Michael bought Armour's interest. Over the next 30 years, the company added
branches across the country, including a cleaning products plant at East
Chicago, Indiana, built in 1909. In 1911, the company's headquarters were
transferred from Omaha to Chicago. By the mid-1920s, Cudahy was one of the
nation's leading food companies, with over $200 million in annual sales and
13,000 employees around the country. Although it was hard hit by the Great
Depression, the company still employed about 1,000 Chicago-area residents
during the mid-1930s. Following World War II, the company moved its
headquarters first to Omaha and, in 1965, to Phoenix, where it took the name
Cudahy Co. During the 1970s, after it was purchased by General Host, Cudahy
was dismantled.
=====================

Now according to my copy of Moody's Industrial's, 1947 edition, the
Armour-Cudahy Packing Company purchased the Jersey City packing plants of
the Nagle Packing Co in 1919, opened large plants in St Paul MN in 1925, San
Diego in 1930, Denver in 1933, Albany GA in 1936. The also owned and
operated the Barry Machinery Co of Chicago, Dow Cheese (WI), Bissel Leather
(MA), The American Salt Company, location unk., and finally it lists the Old
Dutch Cleanser facilities in England and Australia.

Brand names of Puritan, Rex, Gold Coin, Sunlight, and Old Ducth Cleanser.

65 branch houses across the US and overseas.

More details: Slaughter Houses in South Side Omaha, Kansas City, Souix City,
Wichita, North Salt Lake, St Paul, San Diego, Denver, Albany GA.

Other important plants include East Chicao IN -- soap, cleanser, wool
pullery AND reefer construction and repair shops. Leewood TN, refine
vegetable oils; Toronto ON, cleanser; Lyons KS, salt mine. Produce
collection points at Washington Court House, OH, Victoria TX, Fairmount ND,
Neosho MO, New Ulm MN, Alma NE, Fond du Lac WI.

As of the August 1945, the company owns 975 reefers, has 150 more on order,
and 45 tankcars.
==============

So taking all that into consideration, IMO it's reasonable to assume one
might see cars owned by this company moving in and out of major urban
locations anywhere in the US.

There are some discreptencies with what Doug Harding posted. Nothing
significant... Just some variation, perhaps due to the dates of the sources.

Also, Moody's does not list the Patrick Cudahy Company... But that is
probably on account the that company had not sold bonds into the securities
markets.

Further, the 1940 ORER clearly connects the CRLX and COTX car marks with the
Cudahy Packing Company and cites East Chicago IN as the place to send repair
and destroyed notices, with GATX on record as handling interchange and
milage reports.

I think that should clear up a few questions.

Dave Nelson


SUVCWORR@...
 

Dave:

Would you kindly post your file in the group files? None of the columns
lined up the state and city were all in the first two columns.

Thanks.

Rich Orr

In a message dated 12/6/2008 10:05:44 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
dharding@nethtc.net writes:

Sorry, I get the digest version, so am always 24 hours behind ... but I will
see what I can add to the discussion about the Cudahy
meat company. Most of what I have is for the Cudahy Packing Co, based in
Omaha/Chicago. However there were two different
companies, one based in Wisconsin (Cudahy Brothers later renamed Patrick
Cudahy) and the Cudahy Co. (started in Omaha, later HQ
moved to Chicago). A history of Patrick Cudahy can be found at
www.patrickcudahy.com

From Cudahy Packing Co. "yearbooks"
Started in 1890 by Michael & Edward Cudahy, first packing plant in South
Omaha, Neb.
1892 added packing plants in Los Angeles & Sioux City
1900 Kansas City
1906 Wichita, Kansas
1916 Salt Lake City
1919 purchased Nagle Packing Co of Detroit MI and Jersey City NJ
1925 purchased former Farmer's Terminal Packing Co at Newport MN (near St.
Paul)
1930 Charles S. Hardy plant at San Diego acquired (one of the oldest on the
west coast)
1947 Purchased Tovrea Packing in Phoenix, AZ

Branch houses, different from produce stations, were warehouses where
carcasses where shipped, then stored and processed into
chops, steaks, roasts, etc.
in 1926 Open branch houses in: St. Petersburg & Orlando Fla,; Washington DC,
Norfolk VA; Atlanta GA; Georgia and Havana, Cuba;
In 1928 100 new reefers built in Cudahy's Calumet Ind shops
Branch Houses added in 1930: Passaic NJ (rebuilt), Sioux City Ia, Portland Me

Produce (eggs & diary) Stations at:
Washington Court House, Ohio
Sioux City, Ia
Evansville, Wis
Alma, Neb
Davenport, Ia
Fairmount, ND
Memphis, Tenn
Neosho, MO
New Ulm, Minn
Superior, Wis
Winfield, Ia
Granite Falls, Minn added in 1930

Cudahy was also famous for Old Dutch Cleanser: made from volcanic deposits.
Most meat packers were involved with cleaners and soap
products, they were part of the by-products industry for meat packers and
provided additional revenue.

Here is information from a Spreadsheet I keep, sorry about the spacing, it
has five columns, but I think you will be able to
figure it out.

Cudahy Packing Co., Chicago ILL 1931
Packing Plants (10) Branch Houses (78) Produce Plants Old Dutch
Cleanser Plants
State City City City City
AL Birmingham
AL Mobile
AL Montgomery
AR Little Rock
CA Los Angeles
CA Los Angeles
CA San Diego
CA Fresno
CA San Francisco
CT Bridgeport
CT New Haven
CT Waterbury
FL Jacksonville
FL Miami
FL Orlando
FL Pensacola
FL Tampa
GA Atlanta
GA Macon
GA Savannah
IA Sioux City
IA Clinton
IA Davenport
IA Sioux City
IA Winfield
IL Aurora
IL Bloomington
IL Elgin
IL Joliet
IL Peoria
IL Quincy
IL Rockford
IL So. Chicago
IL Springfield
IN Calumet (East Chicago)
KS Wichita
KS Topeka
KS Fredonia
KS Wichita
LA Alexandria
LA Monroe
LA New Orleans
LA Shreveport
MA Boston
MA Fall River
MA Holyoke
MA Lawrence
MA Lowell
MA Worcester
ME Portland
MI Detroit
MN St. Paul
MN Duluth
MN Minneapolis
MN Granite Falls
MN Wadena
MN New Ulm
MO Kansas City
MO Neosho
MS Vicksburg
ND Fairmont
NE Omaha
NE Alma
NE Omaha
NH Nashua
NJ Atlantic City
NJ Jersey City
NJ Passaic
NJ Newark
NY Brooklyn
NY NYC
OH Washington C.H.
OH Youngstown
PA Braddock
PA Charleroi
PA McKeesport
PA New Castle
PA Beaver Falls
PA Pittston
PA Scranton
PA Philadelphia
RI Providence
TN Memphis
TN Chattanooga
UT North Salt Lake
VA Norfolk
WI Fond Du Lac
Washington D.C.
Sydney, Australia
Toronto, Canada
Auckland, New Zealand
Havana, Cuba

Hope this answers a few of the questions about the Cudahy meat packing co
mpanies.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


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SUVCWORR@...
 

In a message dated 12/6/2008 1:46:36 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
thompson@signaturepress.com writes:

Brian Carlson wrote:
OK now I am confused. I thought the Sunshine meat reefer for Cudahy
was for the Wisconsin meat packers. The CRLX cars were Cudahy Car
Lines and were owned by the Cudahy packing Company in Wisconsin. These
cars often came east
on the NKP. Are there two separate Cudahy meat packing companies? The
emails make is sound like there were different corporations.
Brian, I'm no expert on the meat industry, but I believe there
WERE two separate Cudahy companies, one called Cudahy Brothers and
later Patrick Cudahy Inc., based in Wisconsin, the other called Cudahy
Packing, based in Omaha. Someone more knowledgeable than me about
details should chime in here and give us the whole story.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


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