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LIFE - Trainscapes 1950: View from a train window.


Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Somebody may have already posted this, but there is a series of 40-odd *color* pictures on Google/LIFE titled: "Trainscapes 1950: View from a train window." A number of RELEVANT frieght shippers are featured, as well a steam era fright car or two.

One in particular was this Koppers Coke retail facility. Who would buy coke on a retail scale?
http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?q=trainscapes+1950+source:life&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dtrainscapes%2B1950%2Bsource:life%26hl%3Den&imgurl=e67ae0d61d79f076

KL


David Smith
 

It was used for home heating ("Through research, Koppers became the largest
producer of house-heating coke" -
http://www.koppers.com/htm/OurCo_Heri_OldBD.html) Presumably, it could also
have been used in commercial boilers/heating plants.

Dave Smith

On Mon, Dec 22, 2008 at 9:07 PM, Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@verizon.net> wrote:

Somebody may have already posted this, but there is a series of 40-odd
*color* pictures on Google/LIFE titled: "Trainscapes 1950: View from a train
window." A number of RELEVANT frieght shippers are featured, as well a steam
era fright car or two.

One in particular was this Koppers Coke retail facility. Who would buy coke
on a retail scale?

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?q=trainscapes+1950+source:life&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dtrainscapes%2B1950%2Bsource:life%26hl%3Den&imgurl=e67ae0d61d79f076

KL




--
David L. Smith
Da Vinci Science Center
Allentown, PA
http://www.davinci-center.org

Please consider the environment before printing this email.

Everything that needs to be said has already been said. But since no one was
listening, everything must be said again. -- Andre Gide


Don Worthy
 

Oh man, yea. There are some terrific shots in that group. There is one shot that shows a yellow OB box car with the "jar" painted on the door. I'm not sure what it was called but, I'm sure that type car has been talked about on this site.
There are some great shots for scenery help.

--- On Mon, 12/22/08, Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@verizon.net> wrote:

From: Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@verizon.net>
Subject: [STMFC] LIFE - Trainscapes 1950: View from a train window.
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, December 22, 2008, 9:07 PM






Somebody may have already posted this, but there is a series of 40-odd *color* pictures on Google/LIFE titled: "Trainscapes 1950: View from a train window." A number of RELEVANT frieght shippers are featured, as well a steam era fright car or two.

One in particular was this Koppers Coke retail facility. Who would buy coke on a retail scale?
http://images. google.com/ hosted/life/ l?q=trainscapes+ 1950+source: life&prev= /images%3Fq% 3Dtrainscapes% 2B1950%2Bsource: life%26hl% 3Den&imgurl= e67ae0d61d79f076

KL


bill_d_goat
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Don Worthy <don_worthy@...> wrote:

Oh man, yea. There are some terrific shots in that group. There is
one shot that shows a yellow OB box car with the "jar" painted on the
door. I'm not sure what it was called but, I'm sure that type car has
been talked about on this site.
That was Muncie & Western car, called The Ball Line. Muncie was the
home of the maker of the glass jars used for home 'canning' that was
common back then. They are still made so I guess it's still done
Bill Williams


Norman+Laraine Larkin <lono@...>
 

Coke was used as home heating fuel in New England up into the 50s until it was supplanted by oil. Glendale Coal & Coke was a large retailer where I lived.
Norm Larkin

----- Original Message -----
From: Kurt Laughlin
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, December 22, 2008 9:07 PM
Subject: [STMFC] LIFE - Trainscapes 1950: View from a train window.


Somebody may have already posted this, but there is a series of 40-odd *color* pictures on Google/LIFE titled: "Trainscapes 1950: View from a train window." A number of RELEVANT frieght shippers are featured, as well a steam era fright car or two.

One in particular was this Koppers Coke retail facility. Who would buy coke on a retail scale?
http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?q=trainscapes+1950+source:life&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dtrainscapes%2B1950%2Bsource:life%26hl%3Den&imgurl=e67ae0d61d79f076

KL


William Bryk <wmbryk@...>
 

Please forgive the slightly off-topic touch, but I remember my grandfather
receiving a ton of anthracite from Hudson Coal (the former subsidiary of the
Delaware & Hudson Company, which also ran a railroad), which the dump truck
propelled down the chute from the street into the cellar for the the
furnace. This was when we were still living in Waterford, New York, around
1958-59, when I was three or four years old, and I recall that both my
grandfather and my father knew how to shovel coal into the furnace to ensure
a good fire. My father promised to teach me (because even then I knew that
I had to be a fireman before I could become an engineer), but then we
switched to oil heat.

Regards,
William Bryk

On Tue, Dec 23, 2008 at 5:45 PM, Norman+Laraine Larkin <lono@comcast.net>wrote:

Coke was used as home heating fuel in New England up into the 50s until
it was supplanted by oil. Glendale Coal & Coke was a large retailer where I
lived.
Norm Larkin

----- Original Message -----
From: Kurt Laughlin
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, December 22, 2008 9:07 PM
Subject: [STMFC] LIFE - Trainscapes 1950: View from a train window.

Somebody may have already posted this, but there is a series of 40-odd
*color* pictures on Google/LIFE titled: "Trainscapes 1950: View from a train
window." A number of RELEVANT frieght shippers are featured, as well a steam
era fright car or two.

One in particular was this Koppers Coke retail facility. Who would buy coke
on a retail scale?

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?q=trainscapes+1950+source:life&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dtrainscapes%2B1950%2Bsource:life%26hl%3Den&imgurl=e67ae0d61d79f076

KL







Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

Norm,
 
         Can you recall the green & black trucks backed over a sidewalk, pouring coal into an array of chutes into the basement of a building, or home? Rarely modeled scene of a common delivery practice. Thanks for the memory, and the modeling idea.
 
Fred Freitas

--- On Tue, 12/23/08, Norman+Laraine Larkin <lono@comcast.net> wrote:

From: Norman+Laraine Larkin <lono@comcast.net>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] LIFE - Trainscapes 1950: View from a train window.
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, December 23, 2008, 5:45 PM






Coke was used as home heating fuel in New England up into the 50s until it was supplanted by oil. Glendale Coal & Coke was a large retailer where I lived.
Norm Larkin

----- Original Message -----
From: Kurt Laughlin
To: STMFC@yahoogroups. com
Sent: Monday, December 22, 2008 9:07 PM
Subject: [STMFC] LIFE - Trainscapes 1950: View from a train window.

Somebody may have already posted this, but there is a series of 40-odd *color* pictures on Google/LIFE titled: "Trainscapes 1950: View from a train window." A number of RELEVANT frieght shippers are featured, as well a steam era fright car or two.

One in particular was this Koppers Coke retail facility. Who would buy coke on a retail scale?
http://images. google.com/ hosted/life/ l?q=trainscapes+ 1950+source: life&prev= /images%3Fq% 3Dtrainscapes% 2B1950%2Bsource: life%26hl% 3Den&imgurl= e67ae0d61d79f076

KL



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Norman+Laraine Larkin <lono@...>
 

I can, Fred. As a 10-year old kid living in a three decker, I was always around when the coal delivery was made (usually mid-late afternoon). There were three coal bins in the basement (and three boilers), and each was filled on separate schedules. I was usually covered in coal dust watching the fill. The bituminous coal eventually changed to coke, and finally the landlord switched to oil. The summer between my freshman and sophomore years in college (1956) I worked Eastern Gas and Fuel in Everett, Mass. on the coke ovens. EG&F was served by both B&A and B&M. The B&A shipped a 30-40 car coke train out every day; the B&M shipped 20-30 loads. The shipped coke went mainly to retailers and foundries in New England. It was a large coke making facility which supplied a merchant pig blast furnace (in the plant), and it exported surplus coke to Europe.
Regards, Norm Larkin

----- Original Message -----
From: Frederick Freitas
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, December 24, 2008 10:13 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] LIFE - Trainscapes 1950: View from a train window.


Norm,

Can you recall the green & black trucks backed over a sidewalk, pouring coal into an array of chutes into the basement of a building, or home? Rarely modeled scene of a common delivery practice. Thanks for the memory, and the modeling idea.

Fred Freitas

--- On Tue, 12/23/08, Norman+Laraine Larkin <lono@comcast.net> wrote:

From: Norman+Laraine Larkin <lono@comcast.net>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] LIFE - Trainscapes 1950: View from a train window.
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, December 23, 2008, 5:45 PM

Coke was used as home heating fuel in New England up into the 50s until it was supplanted by oil. Glendale Coal & Coke was a large retailer where I lived.
Norm Larkin

----- Original Message -----
From: Kurt Laughlin
To: STMFC@yahoogroups. com
Sent: Monday, December 22, 2008 9:07 PM
Subject: [STMFC] LIFE - Trainscapes 1950: View from a train window.

Somebody may have already posted this, but there is a series of 40-odd *color* pictures on Google/LIFE titled: "Trainscapes 1950: View from a train window." A number of RELEVANT frieght shippers are featured, as well a steam era fright car or two.

One in particular was this Koppers Coke retail facility. Who would buy coke on a retail scale?
http://images. google.com/ hosted/life/ l?q=trainscapes+ 1950+source: life&prev= /images%3Fq% 3Dtrainscapes% 2B1950%2Bsource: life%26hl% 3Den&imgurl= e67ae0d61d79f076

KL