hand brake locations.


Eric Carlson <etcengineer2000@...>
 

Group,

This is most likely a easy question but I can not find the answer. I am
wondering when did it become out-lawed to have the brake wheel on the
top of the car? I am modeling the early 50s and wonder if I need to
switch my cars over. Thanks

Eric Carlson


Robert <riverob@...>
 

My notes indicate that high mount hand brakes were prohibited on new
cars after 1/1/67. High brakes on existing equipment lasted well
into the 80s, at least.

In the early 50's very few cars with high ends would have low brakes.

Rob Simpson




--- In STMFC@..., "Eric Carlson" <etcengineer2000@...>
wrote:

Group,

This is most likely a easy question but I can not find the answer.
I am wondering when did it become out-lawed to have the brake wheel
on the top of the car? I am modeling the early 50s and wonder if I
need to switch my cars over. Thanks

Eric Carlson


Larry Jackman <Ljack70117@...>
 

I left the Santa Fe in 1955 and there were still staff brakes above the roof then.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@...

On Jan 2, 2009, at 9:27 AM, Eric Carlson wrote:

Group,

This is most likely a easy question but I can not find the answer. I am
wondering when did it become out-lawed to have the brake wheel on the
top of the car? I am modeling the early 50s and wonder if I need to
switch my cars over. Thanks

Eric Carlson


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Bruce Smith
 

"What we've got here is failure to communicate"

I believe that the original question referred to the standard position of
horizontal shaft brakewheels in the steam era (high) versus the current
standard position (low), although it could easily have been asking for the
transition from vertical shaft to horizontal shaft... As noted earlier,
the former was well beyond the scope of this list. The latter is less
clear. I'm not sure that there was a specific ban on vertical shaft
handbrakes in the era covered by this list, as I do not see anything in
the AAR interchange listing in the group files. There were some related
rules, such as the requirement for geared handbrakes on new or rebuilt
cars circa 1937, but I will note that there were some vertical shaft
geared handbrakes...

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

On Fri, January 2, 2009 9:42 am, Larry Jackman wrote:
I left the Santa Fe in 1955 and there were still staff brakes above
the roof then.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@...

On Jan 2, 2009, at 9:27 AM, Eric Carlson wrote:

Group,

This is most likely a easy question but I can not find the answer.
I am wondering when did it become out-lawed to have the brake wheel on the
top of the car? I am modeling the early 50s and wonder if I need to
switch my cars over. Thanks

Eric Carlson


Ron Smith <rpsmith@...>
 

Rob,
There are still a few High Hand Brakes on older cars to this day.
Ron Smith
Carman UPRR

----- Original Message -----
From: Robert
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, January 02, 2009 6:51 AM
Subject: [STMFC] hand brake locations.


My notes indicate that high mount hand brakes were prohibited on new
cars after 1/1/67. High brakes on existing equipment lasted well
into the 80s, at least.

In the early 50's very few cars with high ends would have low brakes.

Rob Simpson

--- In STMFC@..., "Eric Carlson" <etcengineer2000@...>
wrote:
>
> Group,
>
> This is most likely a easy question but I can not find the answer.
I am wondering when did it become out-lawed to have the brake wheel
on the top of the car? I am modeling the early 50s and wonder if I
need to switch my cars over. Thanks
>
> Eric Carlson






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Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jan 2, 2009, at 7:58 AM, Bruce Smith wrote:

....I'm not sure that there was a specific ban on vertical shaft
handbrakes in the era covered by this list, as I do not see
anything in
the AAR interchange listing in the group files. There were some
related
rules, such as the requirement for geared handbrakes on new or rebuilt
cars circa 1937, but I will note that there were some vertical shaft
geared handbrakes...







Correct. I believe the last box cars built with non-geared vertical
staff hand brakes, at least for a major railroad, were the GN
50000-50999 series double wood sheathed cars, delivered late in
1937. Later GN cars of the same design had geared hand brakes. And,
yes, there were geared vertical staff brakes, e.g. the Klassing
Safety hand brake fitted to many Mather cars in the late 1930s and
1940s.

Richard Hendrickson


Bill Vaughn
 

About 1966 if memory serves me right.  Same time as roof walks were gone on new cars.  However high brake wheels lasted a long time after 1966.

--- On Fri, 1/2/09, Eric Carlson <etcengineer2000@...> wrote:

From: Eric Carlson <etcengineer2000@...>
Subject: [STMFC] hand brake locations.
To: STMFC@...
Date: Friday, January 2, 2009, 6:27 AM






Group,

This is most likely a easy question but I can not find the answer. I am
wondering when did it become out-lawed to have the brake wheel on the
top of the car? I am modeling the early 50s and wonder if I need to
switch my cars over. Thanks

Eric Carlson


















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Tom Madden <tgmadden@...>
 

About 1966 if memory serves me right.  Same time as roof walks were
gone on new cars.  However high brake wheels lasted a long time
after 1966.
Guess it must be a generational thing. Being a senior citizen, I
assumed the original question was about brake wheels on vertical staffs
that stood above the roof walk vs. power hand brakes mounted on the car
ends. Younger folks seem to have assumed the questioner wanted the date
for lowering power hand brakes with the elimination of roof walks. But
then, when someone at the club wants to talk about coalporters, I start
humming "In the Still of the Night", and aluminum-bodied hopper cars
never enter my mind.

If the reference to a certain 20th century composer in that last
sentence eludes you, you really do need to broaden your horizons.

Tom Madden


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tom Madden wrote:
Guess it must be a generational thing. Being a senior citizen, I assumed the original question was about brake wheels on vertical staffs that stood above the roof walk . . .
And you were right, as we subsequently learned.

But then, when someone at the club wants to talk about coalporters, I start humming "In the Still of the Night", and aluminum-bodied hopper cars never enter my mind.
If the reference to a certain 20th century composer in that last sentence eludes you, you really do need to broaden your horizons.
Being perhaps a different sort of senior citizen than Tom, I read that song title and started humming the Five Satins' great doo-wop tune of the same name from 1956 . . . one of the few things that dissatisfy me about my chosen 1953 modeling date is that it's really pre-rock 'n' roll, so I can't use such songs as layout background. Or shouldn't. <g>

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Well, guys, I've heard of all sorts of brake staffs and brake
wheels both on and off this list, some steam era and some not, but
I've never heard of a musician named "coalporter". Cole Porter
certainly but "coalporter" no. Perhaps it depends on where one
learned to spell and whom they had for a teacher. <VBG> I'm with
both of you "In the Still of the Night" but Tony, if you need good
layout backround music how about some Jimmie Rodgers or J.J. Cale!
Jimmie Rodgers is certainly steam era and you could even try the
Jimmie Rodgers Festival in Meridian, MS this summer to get you better
acquainted. As for J.J. Cale some thirty years ago Railfan's Jim Boyd
put together a great slide show with J.J. Cale background music that
worked out very well and really added to the presentation.

Just some thoughts to keep your ears happy, Don Valentine



--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Tom Madden wrote:
Guess it must be a generational thing. Being a senior citizen, I
assumed the original question was about brake wheels on vertical
staffs that stood above the roof walk . . .
And you were right, as we subsequently learned.

But then, when someone at the club wants to talk about
coalporters, I
start humming "In the Still of the Night", and aluminum-bodied
hopper
cars never enter my mind.
If the reference to a certain 20th century composer in that last
sentence eludes you, you really do need to broaden your horizons.
Being perhaps a different sort of senior citizen than Tom,
I
read that song title and started humming the Five Satins' great doo-
wop
tune of the same name from 1956 . . . one of the few things that
dissatisfy me about my chosen 1953 modeling date is that it's
really
pre-rock 'n' roll, so I can't use such songs as layout background.
Or
shouldn't. <g>

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history