Topics

AMB Wheels Masks


Mike Fortney
 

Finally - a durable, cleanable (acrylic AND solvent-based paints),
flexible wheel mask with a built-in handle. Might not be able to paint
more than four wheelsets at a time, but with the ease of
loading/unloading, one should be able to paint just as many in the
same amount of time as using other, more unwieldy masks. Having less
mask material in the way of the airbrush stream is also a big plus.

http://www.rgspemkt.com/WheelMask.html

Mike Fortney

Disclaimer: Yeah, I'll confess to being one of the culprits nagging
AMB for years to produce this!


jerryglow2
 

I never could get over the use of masks, use of masking tape, etc. I
kept a couple pair of "shop" trucks, put the wheelsets in them and
painted. A pipe cleaner dipped in thinner done immediately cleaned the
treads. It usually even left a thin edge of the weathering on the outer
edge of the tread.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "itc_725" <emfour@...> wrote:

Finally - a durable, cleanable (acrylic AND solvent-based paints),
flexible wheel mask with a built-in handle. Might not be able to paint
more than four wheelsets at a time, but with the ease of
loading/unloading, one should be able to paint just as many in the
same amount of time as using other, more unwieldy masks. Having less
mask material in the way of the airbrush stream is also a big plus.

http://www.rgspemkt.com/WheelMask.html

Mike Fortney

Disclaimer: Yeah, I'll confess to being one of the culprits nagging
AMB for years to produce this!


Tim O'Connor
 

Those AMB wheel masks look great. Modeler's Choice makes
less expensive masks that let you paint 8 at a time. Or
buy 5 sets for the price of 2 AMB sets and paint 40 at a
time instead of 8. (I only say this because generally it
is best to let the wheels dry before removing them from
the mask.)

Most steam era wheel faces were caked with oil or dirt+oil.

http://www.modelerschoice.com/masks.htm

Tim

At 2/6/2009 10:51 AM Friday, you wrote:
I never could get over the use of masks, use of masking tape, etc. I
kept a couple pair of "shop" trucks, put the wheelsets in them and
painted. A pipe cleaner dipped in thinner done immediately cleaned the
treads. It usually even left a thin edge of the weathering on the outer
edge of the tread.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "itc_725" <emfour@...> wrote:

Finally - a durable, cleanable (acrylic AND solvent-based paints),
flexible wheel mask with a built-in handle. Might not be able to paint
more than four wheelsets at a time, but with the ease of
loading/unloading, one should be able to paint just as many in the
same amount of time as using other, more unwieldy masks. Having less
mask material in the way of the airbrush stream is also a big plus.

http://www.rgspemkt.com/WheelMask.html

Mike Fortney

Disclaimer: Yeah, I'll confess to being one of the culprits nagging
AMB for years to produce this!


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 6, 2009, at 10:34 AM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
Those AMB wheel masks look great. Modeler's Choice makes
less expensive masks that let you paint 8 at a time. Or
buy 5 sets for the price of 2 AMB sets and paint 40 at a
time instead of 8. (I only say this because generally it
is best to let the wheels dry before removing them from
the mask.)

Most steam era wheel faces were caked with oil or dirt+oil.










Tim makes a most important point here, especially since the photos on
the AMB website show the wheels in their jig painted a uniform rust
color. Okay for wheels in roller bearing trucks, but definitely NOT
okay on steam era freight cars with solid bearings. Oil leaking past
the primitive seals at the back of the journal boxes ran out onto the
wheel faces, which distributed it all over the underside of the car
and, in stripes, up the ends of adjacent cars. The oil, of course,
collected grime, with the result that the wheel faces were a dirty
dark gray. Wheel backs and axles, on the other hand were a dirty
rust color. Though there is an abundance of photographic evidence
for this, I repeatedly see models of steam era freight cars at RPM
meets or in photos with rusty wheels, though I suppose that's better
than shiny metal wheels popped into the trucks just as they come out
of the box.


Richard Hendrickson


Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

Does anyone have experience with the Modelerschoice mask?

It looks like it would be somewhat more difficult to get an even
coating of paint on the axles and back side of the wheels. Can anyone
comment on this?

On the other hand the Modelerschoice mask would facilitate the black or
gray outside wheel surface while painting the inside and axle some
shade of rust or dust.

http://www.modelerschoice.com/masks.htm

http://www.rgspemkt.com/WheelMask.html

Gene Green


Tim O'Connor
 

Gene, yes I do. You just have to hold the mask in
different orientations to the airbrush, and you can
get complete coverage. And yes I paint the axle and
backs of the wheels a different color (actually more
than one color blend).

Tim O'

At 2/6/2009 04:30 PM Friday, you wrote:
Does anyone have experience with the Modelerschoice mask?

It looks like it would be somewhat more difficult to get an even
coating of paint on the axles and back side of the wheels. Can anyone
comment on this?

On the other hand the Modelerschoice mask would facilitate the black or
gray outside wheel surface while painting the inside and axle some
shade of rust or dust.

http://www.modelerschoice.com/masks.htm

http://www.rgspemkt.com/WheelMask.html

Gene Green


Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
 

Hello Gene,

I've been using the Modelers Choice masks for a couple years now. I find that do have to rotate them to various angles to make sure of good coverage on the axles and backs of the wheels, but it's not hard to do. I'm looking forward to trying the AMB masks though. I'm a great believer in painting wheelsets, so I'm up for anything that looks like it will make that a bit easier. (And yes, I have painted a lot of wheels with a brush, but airbrushing goes much faster.)

So long,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
Model Railroader magazine
asperandeo@mrmag.com
262-796-8776, ext. 461
FAX 262-796-1142


Ned Carey <nedspam@...>
 

I just uploaded two photos of my own home made wheel painting fixture. It may be a while before one of our moderators approve them but they will be in a file named Ned Carey wheel paint tool. The tool has a hinged surface that opens up to install the wheelsets.

With mine I find I can easily paint the inner surfaces a rusty color and the outer surfaces a more grimy black color. The hardest part is cleaning the axel tips off after painting.

From having used several versions of my own tools I suspect the modelers choice tool will not be as easy to use as the AMB version.

Ned Carey


Jim and Lisa Hayes <jimandlisa97225@...>
 

I have the Modeler's Choice tool and the AMB mask looks much easier to use.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon

Ned Carey wrote:

From having used several versions of my own tools I suspect the modelers choice tool will not be as easy to use as the AMB version.
Ned Carey


Mike Fortney
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Ned Carey" <nedspam@...> wrote:
The hardest part is cleaning the axel tips off after painting.



Ned Carey

I've used tiny dingleberries of modeling clay to cap the axle ends for
painting with no problem. When done, smash 'em back into the big ball
of clay for next use. One could also use bits of light-tack masking
tape but do beware of any adhesive residue.

Mike Fortney


Bruce Smith
 

On Fri, February 6, 2009 5:30 pm, itc_725 wrote:
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Ned Carey" <nedspam@...> wrote:
The hardest part is cleaning the axel tips off after painting.



Ned Carey

I've used tiny dingleberries of modeling clay to cap the axle ends for
painting with no problem. When done, smash 'em back into the big ball
of clay for next use. One could also use bits of light-tack masking
tape but do beware of any adhesive residue.

Mike Fortney
Wow, I just paint 'em, stick 'em in a truck, run 'em for a few seconds
and presto(!) they roll just as smooth as if the day they were born... ;^)

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


devansprr
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
wrote:

Tim makes a most important point here, especially since the photos on
the AMB website show the wheels in their jig painted a uniform rust
color. Okay for wheels in roller bearing trucks, but definitely NOT
okay on steam era freight cars with solid bearings. Oil leaking past
the primitive seals at the back of the journal boxes ran out onto the
wheel faces, which distributed it all over the underside of the car
and, in stripes, up the ends of adjacent cars. The oil, of course,
collected grime, with the result that the wheel faces were a dirty
dark gray. Wheel backs and axles, on the other hand were a dirty
rust color. Though there is an abundance of photographic evidence
for this, I repeatedly see models of steam era freight cars at RPM
meets or in photos with rusty wheels, though I suppose that's better
than shiny metal wheels popped into the trucks just as they come out
of the box.


Richard Hendrickson
Richard & Tim,

Pardon the interuption - perhaps a little off-topic. Does this mean
that rails should be grimy on the outside surfaces, but rusty on the
sides facing each other? Stands to reason that oil running off the
face of the wheel ends up on the outside corner of the rail where it
would be squeezed over the outside corner. Not much of the oil would
make it to the inside edge. Ballast dust would quickly glom onto this
oil and kind of set it permanently.

Might the ties and ballast reflect a similar effect? More greasy/grimy
outboard of the rails, and more indicative of other materials on the
inside - e.g. brake shoe dust on down grades, sand on upgrades,
cinders everywhere else?

Good color photos of WWII track work (mainline, not yards) seem to be
rare. Many are below grade, pointed up towards equipment, and the
rails and ties are often in the shadows.

Stands to reason that the appearance of post-journal bearing, post
steam, and post passenger track could be quite different.

Dave Evans


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Dave Evans wrote:
Stands to reason that the appearance of post-journal bearing, post steam, and post passenger track could be quite different.
I'm guessing that you are referring to "post solid bearing," but keep in mind that both roller and solid bearings are journal bearings. The journal is that part of the axle on which the bearing rides.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


devansprr
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Dave Evans wrote:
Stands to reason that the appearance of post-journal bearing, post
steam, and post passenger track could be quite different.
I'm guessing that you are referring to "post solid bearing," but
keep in mind that both roller and solid bearings are journal bearings.
The journal is that part of the axle on which the bearing rides.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history
Tony,

You are correct - I meant post solid bearings

Dave


Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "itc_725" <emfour@...> wrote:

I've used tiny dingleberries of modeling clay to cap the axle ends for
painting with no problem. When done, smash 'em back into the big ball
of clay for next use. One could also use bits of light-tack masking
tape but do beware of any adhesive residue.

Mike Fortney
Thanks to Tim O'Connor, Andy Sperandeo, Ned Carey, Jim Hayes, Mike
Fortney and Bruce Smith for encouraging responses. I am about to make
a purchase. Luckily this is something within my price range.

The Modelers Choice masking device looks better for me since I would
prefer to squirt paint on a large number of wheels and axles at one
time. But either one is better than my two home-made gizmos.

Gene Green


Jack Burgess
 

A couple of years ago, I built a wheelset holder similar to the Modelers
Choice holder but found it difficult to get all of the wheelsets into it
without others falling out. I therefore built one from my own design in
later 2007 or so and an article on it was published in the September 2008
RMC. While it holds only a single wheelset at a time, it does have a way to
cover the axle bearing surfaces. While mine is built from brass shapes, the
AMB model is Plexiglas and holds 4 wheelsets but otherwise they are very
similar designs. The last sentence of my article reads "Maybe a manufacturer
will see the benefits of such a holder and release a commercial version in
the near future that is even better!"

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


W. Lindsay Smith <wlindsays2000@...>
 

I use a drop of Micro Mask liquid on the axle ends
Lindsay Smith
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Ned Carey" <nedspam@...> wrote:

I just uploaded two photos of my own home made wheel painting
SNIP
The hardest part is cleaning the axel tips off after painting.
SNIP> Ned Carey
SNIP


David North <davenorth@...>
 

These are neat. I fabricated some wheel masks out of styrene and PC board
spacers.

To mask the axle ends, I made caps out of shrink wrap tubing, pinching the
outer end with a pair of flat nose pliers.

They are reusable and quick to fit.

Obviously there are different caps for each brand of wheel.

Cheers

Dave


Robert Klostermann <bboots@...>
 

Ned,
Your folder is empty. Can you upload them again.
Bob

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ned Carey" <nedspam@comcast.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, February 06, 2009 4:30 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: AMB Wheels Masks


I just uploaded two photos of my own home made wheel painting fixture. It may be a while before one of our moderators approve them but they will be in a file named Ned Carey wheel paint tool. The tool has a hinged surface that opens up to install the wheelsets.

With mine I find I can easily paint the inner surfaces a rusty color and the outer surfaces a more grimy black color. The hardest part is cleaning the axel tips off after painting.

From having used several versions of my own tools I suspect the modelers choice tool will not be as easy to use as the AMB version.

Ned Carey




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Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

If you look at photos of mainline track in our timeframe, you'll see
that the rails are often oily black to the outside of the track, and
rusty on the inside. This was a result of oil sprayed off wheelsets.
And yes, this oil had leaked from plain bearing journal boxes.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "devansprr" <devans1@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@>
wrote:

Tim makes a most important point here, especially since the photos
on
the AMB website show the wheels in their jig painted a uniform rust
color. Okay for wheels in roller bearing trucks, but definitely NOT
okay on steam era freight cars with solid bearings. Oil leaking past
the primitive seals at the back of the journal boxes ran out onto
the
wheel faces, which distributed it all over the underside of the car
and, in stripes, up the ends of adjacent cars. The oil, of course,
collected grime, with the result that the wheel faces were a dirty
dark gray. Wheel backs and axles, on the other hand were a dirty
rust color. Though there is an abundance of photographic evidence
for this, I repeatedly see models of steam era freight cars at RPM
meets or in photos with rusty wheels, though I suppose that's better
than shiny metal wheels popped into the trucks just as they come out
of the box.


Richard Hendrickson
Richard & Tim,

Pardon the interuption - perhaps a little off-topic. Does this mean
that rails should be grimy on the outside surfaces, but rusty on the
sides facing each other? Stands to reason that oil running off the
face of the wheel ends up on the outside corner of the rail where it
would be squeezed over the outside corner. Not much of the oil would
make it to the inside edge. Ballast dust would quickly glom onto this
oil and kind of set it permanently.

Might the ties and ballast reflect a similar effect? More greasy/grimy
outboard of the rails, and more indicative of other materials on the
inside - e.g. brake shoe dust on down grades, sand on upgrades,
cinders everywhere else?

Good color photos of WWII track work (mainline, not yards) seem to be
rare. Many are below grade, pointed up towards equipment, and the
rails and ties are often in the shadows.

Stands to reason that the appearance of post-journal bearing, post
steam, and post passenger track could be quite different.

Dave Evans