taking out broken drill bits, was "Drill Bits and MiniMate"


Claude Quesnelle
 

All,

I'm sure you've read my last posts asking about the Dremel Work Station and MiniMite held in the hand (drilling "freehand"). The reason for this interest: I have a locomotive shell that I was working on, using a #80 in a pin vice to drill out holes for hand grabs and, as luck would have it, or maybe cause I didn't have a steady hand :-(, said bit broke into the piece, with very little sticking out. Either I develop a steadier hand or get a drill press. But, back to the loco shell. Does anyone have any tips or tricks on how to extract that broken bit? When I say there isn't much sticking out, I can run my finger over it and there is hardly any catch, some yes, but not much.

Thanks

Claude


Rod Miller
 

This works on brass models. I don't know what will happen
with your diecast boiler. You might want to experiment first.
Perhaps others have more information on diecast.

I remove all ferrous parts and then immerse the brass
part with the embedded broken screw/drill in a solution of
salt water, highly concentrated. Takes a few days, and will
damage paint.

There is a faster method using IIRC alum. Hopefully someone
will chime in with info on it.

Rod

Quesnelle, Claude wrote:

All,
I'm sure you've read my last posts asking about the Dremel
Work Station and MiniMite held in the hand (drilling
"freehand"). The reason for this interest: I have a
locomotive shell that I was working on, using a #80 in a pin
vice to drill out holes for hand grabs and, as luck would have
it, or maybe cause I didn't have a steady hand :-(, said bit
broke into the piece, with very little sticking out. Either I
develop a steadier hand or get a drill press. But, back to
the loco shell. Does anyone have any tips or tricks on how to
extract that broken bit? When I say there isn't much sticking
out, I can run my finger over it and there is hardly any
catch, some yes, but not much.
Thanks
Claude


Victor Bitleris
 

Hi Claude,
So far, I have been very fortunate and have been able to retrieve these little broken pieces whenever I have done this in a cast locomotive. A plastic one should be easy, you may be able to pull it through on the inside? A cast one is more difficult, because likely it did not go through. There are two things you may wish to try. 1. using magnifiers, see if you can back it out slowly with a scriber. Once (If) you get it to the point where you have any purchase on it at all, get some very small tight closing pliers and using magnifiers, try to grab the drill and back it out with a twisting motion. You may need to do this several times. If it actually starts to move, it is just a matter of perseverance and it will come out. 2. If, on the other hand, if it just gets rounded off and loses any ability to grab it, then the only thing I know of is to make a small hole adjacent to the piece and get it out using a scriber or something like that. Of course, you will need to fill in the hole and start again. I find it is not too bad to fill in a hole in a cast locomotive. I drill the offending area out and tap it with either, an 00-90, 0-80, 0r 1-72, whichever is the smallest tap that will work. I try the brass screw in the newly tapped hole to make sure it is good, then I put some Tix flux on the screw, heat it up, put some solder to it and as soon as the solder starts to liquify, you want to screw it in right away. You get one shot at this, so it is best to leave the soldering iron on the side of the scerew and screw it in while heating up. Trust me, when done this way it isn't coming out, even if you heat it again. File it down, mark and proceed to make a new hole.

Vic Bitleris
Raleigh, NC



To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
From: brossard77@yahoo.ca
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2009 15:08:30 -0500
Subject: [STMFC] taking out broken drill bits, was "Drill Bits and MiniMate"





















All,



I'm sure you've read my last posts asking about the Dremel Work Station and MiniMite held in the hand (drilling "freehand"). The reason for this interest: I have a locomotive shell that I was working on, using a #80 in a pin vice to drill out holes for hand grabs and, as luck would have it, or maybe cause I didn't have a steady hand :-(, said bit broke into the piece, with very little sticking out. Either I develop a steadier hand or get a drill press. But, back to the loco shell. Does anyone have any tips or tricks on how to extract that broken bit? When I say there isn't much sticking out, I can run my finger over it and there is hardly any catch, some yes, but not much.



Thanks



Claude






















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Steve SANDIFER
 

If you have been around a commercial machine shop, you know that they usually do machine work with cutting/cooling oils involved. The oils cool the pieces, wash out the cuttings, preserve the cutting surfaces, give smoother cuts and lubricate the tools. When working on a brass casting (like an old PFM cast caboose) or an old cast metal diesel, use a quality cutting oil on your drill and feed it very very slowly, cleaning out the hole from time to time. Otherwise you are guaranteed to snap a drill.

----------------------------------------------------------------
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@sbcglobal.net
Home: 12027 Mulholland Dr., Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX
77025, 713-667-9417
Personal: http://www.geocities.com/stevesandifer2000/index
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----- Original Message -----
From: Rod Miller
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2009 3:40 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] taking out broken drill bits, was "Drill Bits and MiniMate"


This works on brass models. I don't know what will happen
with your diecast boiler. You might want to experiment first.
Perhaps others have more information on diecast.

I remove all ferrous parts and then immerse the brass
part with the embedded broken screw/drill in a solution of
salt water, highly concentrated. Takes a few days, and will
damage paint.

There is a faster method using IIRC alum. Hopefully someone
will chime in with info on it.

Rod

Quesnelle, Claude wrote:
> All,
>
> I'm sure you've read my last posts asking about the Dremel
> Work Station and MiniMite held in the hand (drilling
> "freehand"). The reason for this interest: I have a
> locomotive shell that I was working on, using a #80 in a pin
> vice to drill out holes for hand grabs and, as luck would have
> it, or maybe cause I didn't have a steady hand :-(, said bit
> broke into the piece, with very little sticking out. Either I
> develop a steadier hand or get a drill press. But, back to
> the loco shell. Does anyone have any tips or tricks on how to
> extract that broken bit? When I say there isn't much sticking
> out, I can run my finger over it and there is hardly any
> catch, some yes, but not much.
>
> Thanks
>
> Claude


Bob Jones <bobjonesmodels@...>
 

Hi , Use alum by heating some water , mix in the alum , and submerge the area with the drill bit in it . Leave it until the bubbles stop coming up , and the bit will be gone . Keeping the water warm shortens the time . Alum is available in the spice section of most supermarkets . Bob Jones , Ct

----- Original Message -----
rom: Rod Miller
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: 3/3/2009 4:42:01 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] taking out broken drill bits, was "Drill Bits and MiniMate"


This works on brass models. I don't know what will happen
with your diecast boiler. You might want to experiment first.
Perhaps others have more information on diecast.

I remove all ferrous parts and then immerse the brass
part with the embedded broken screw/drill in a solution of
salt water, highly concentrated. Takes a few days, and will
damage paint.

There is a faster method using IIRC alum. Hopefully someone
will chime in with info on it.

Rod

Quesnelle, Claude wrote:
All,

I'm sure you've read my last posts asking about the Dremel
Work Station and MiniMite held in the hand (drilling
"freehand"). The reason for this interest: I have a
locomotive shell that I was working on, using a #80 in a pin
vice to drill out holes for hand grabs and, as luck would have
it, or maybe cause I didn't have a steady hand :-(, said bit
broke into the piece, with very little sticking out. Either I
develop a steadier hand or get a drill press. But, back to
the loco shell. Does anyone have any tips or tricks on how to
extract that broken bit? When I say there isn't much sticking
out, I can run my finger over it and there is hardly any
catch, some yes, but not much.

Thanks

Claude