Freight cars equipped with covers.


Allen Rueter
 

Besides cut steel sheet/Tin plate, what else is transported in covered gons,
after WWII, in the mid west.
I'm more curious about covered low side gons, that seems to low, for coiled steel.
(or were coils laid on their sides, eye to the sky)

--
Allen Rueter - ex Gary Works mill rat.
StLouis MO


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Allen Rueter wrote:
Besides cut steel sheet/Tin plate, what else is transported in covered gons, after WWII, in the mid west.
I'm more curious about covered low side gons, that seems to low, for coiled steel. (or were coils laid on their sides, eye to the sky)
Not coils that I'm aware of. SP added covers for shipment of aluminum shapes and plate.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Tim O'Connor
 

Coils could be small -- there is an interior shot of N&W 72180
that shows two parallel coil troughs running the length of the
car, and the roof is only as high as the car sides.

At 3/31/2009 08:29 PM Tuesday, you wrote:
Allen Rueter wrote:
Besides cut steel sheet/Tin plate, what else is transported in
covered gons, after WWII, in the mid west.
I'm more curious about covered low side gons, that seems to low, for
coiled steel. (or were coils laid on their sides, eye to the sky)
Not coils that I'm aware of. SP added covers for shipment of
aluminum shapes and plate.

Tony Thompson


Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Some businesses could only handle small coils (the largest coils weighed >10
tons and had to be handled by special forklifts or overhead cranes); tin can
manufacturers, users that manufactured small products that utilized small
pieces of pressed steel, like salt & pepper shaker makers or pressed steel
toy makers did not need gigantic coils. It was not until the auto and
appliance industries started clamoring for larger coils that the RRs had to
answer with taller gons, then skid & cover gons. There were, and continue to
be, many users of small coil. Much of it is now shipped on pallets in box
cars.



Box car shipment of medium to large coils had always been marginally viable.
I have some photos taken by the PRR that show what kind of damage even
medium-sized coils did to box car interiors. I put some of these photos in
the STMFC files. Despite retro-fitting box cars with steel linings to handle
coils, numerous railroads went to skids & covers in the mid-50's to both
handle the new 72" coils, and to use friction (skid vs floor) to dissipate
energy.



Gons with covers could only handle small coils. An extended side/end gon
with covers could handle larger coils, plus bundles of sheet, depending on
the restraints fitted. Finally, cars with skids & covers could handle the
largest coils. Gons with cradles only could handle hot-rolled coil that did
not require weather protection. The PRR had all of them.



It appears that only hot-rolled coil was laid "eye up". Too much damage
could be done to high-quality cold-rolled sheet when trying to unload it if
you did not load it with the eye to the side. My friend that worked at USS
Irvin had a lot of stories about coil mishaps.



Elden Gatwood







________________________________

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tim
O'Connor
Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 12:48 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re:Freight cars equipped with covers.




Coils could be small -- there is an interior shot of N&W 72180
that shows two parallel coil troughs running the length of the
car, and the roof is only as high as the car sides.

At 3/31/2009 08:29 PM Tuesday, you wrote:
Allen Rueter wrote:
Besides cut steel sheet/Tin plate, what else is transported in
covered gons, after WWII, in the mid west.
I'm more curious about covered low side gons, that seems to low, for
coiled steel. (or were coils laid on their sides, eye to the sky)
Not coils that I'm aware of. SP added covers for shipment of
aluminum shapes and plate.

Tony Thompson


CJ Riley
 

--- On Wed, 4/1/09, Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@usace.army.mil> wrote:

From: Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@usace.army.mil>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re:Freight cars equipped with covers.
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, April 1, 2009, 8:04 AM











It appears that only hot-rolled coil was laid "eye up".

Too much damage could be done to high-quality cold-rolled sheet when trying to unload it if you did not load it with the eye to the side. My friend that worked at USS Irvin had a lot of stories about coil mishaps.


My Dad liked to tell stories about the J&L mill when a visiting customer of high enough rank was on tour, the last roller would be tightened down, causing the quickly moving sheet behind it to shoot up to the ceiling in a mess of random coils before the line could be stopped. Then some poor SOB would have to cut the ness apart with torches to get the line rolling again. I always hoped they didn't do this often.CJ Riley
from a J&L family


Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

From my 1961 ORER (probably also relevant to pre-1961 traffic), some non-steel, non-tin, GBR/GBSR cargoes:

NYC - GBSR, aluminum billets
SOU - GBSR, aluminum and steel mill products
C&O - GBR, Army tank engines
NKP - GBSR, special loading
ATSF - GBR, AEC material

There were several GBSRs that were used for coils on pallets.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Allen Rueter

Besides cut steel sheet/Tin plate, what else is transported in covered gons,
after WWII, in the mid west.
I'm more curious about covered low side gons, that seems to low, for coiled steel.
(or were coils laid on their sides, eye to the sky)


water.kresse@...
 

In the late-50s the C&O started experimenting with gons with wooden skided troughs for smaller steel coils (48" diameter or so).  These had various canvass (yes) and steel covers.  The unions crane operators wouldn't remove and properly stow the cavass covers like todays truck drivers do, so crane removed steel covers became the standard . . . . and they helped to lose more business for the railroads.  On thicker guages they might ship the steel coils less any covers . . . just separated by blocks of wood.



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: "Kurt Laughlin" <fleeta@verizon.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, April 2, 2009 8:08:20 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re:Freight cars equipped with  covers.

From my 1961 ORER (probably also relevant to pre-1961 traffic), some
non-steel, non-tin, GBR/GBSR cargoes:

NYC - GBSR, aluminum billets
SOU - GBSR, aluminum and steel mill products
C&O - GBR, Army tank engines
NKP - GBSR, special loading
ATSF - GBR, AEC material

There were several GBSRs that were used for coils on pallets.

KL


----- Original Message -----
From: Allen Rueter

Besides cut steel sheet/Tin plate, what else is transported in covered gons,
after WWII, in the mid west.
I'm more curious about covered low side gons, that seems to low, for coiled
steel.
(or were coils laid on their sides, eye to the sky)


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Al Kresset wrote:
In the late-50s the C&O started experimenting with gons with wooden skided troughs for smaller steel coils (48" diameter or so) . . . On thicker guages they might ship the steel coils less any covers . . . just separated by blocks of wood.
The thicker gauge material is largely hot-rolled and will ordinarily see further processing, thus less concern about scratches, dents and rust. Any gauge near final use thickness will be shipped with protection.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


water.kresse@...
 

That is correct.  The coils were not even wrapped in paper in many cases.



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: "Anthony Thompson" <thompson@signaturepress.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, April 2, 2009 9:28:21 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re:Freight cars equipped with  covers.

Al Kresset wrote:
In the late-50s the C&O started experimenting with gons with wooden  
skided troughs for smaller steel coils (48" diameter or so) . . . On  
thicker guages they might ship the steel coils less any covers . . .  
just separated by blocks of wood.
      The thicker gauge material is largely hot-rolled and will  
ordinarily see further processing, thus less concern about scratches,  
dents and rust. Any gauge near final use thickness will be shipped  
with protection.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Dave Nelson
 

Allen Rueter wrote:
Besides cut steel sheet/Tin plate, what else is transported in
covered gons, after WWII?
I know the Western Pacific once did an experiment shipping plate glass in a
covered gon. They delivered cullet.

Dave Nelson