MILW double-sheathed box cars


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

According to the Milwaukee's 1937 freight car diagram book, 500000-502954, built 1913, and 92482-93480, built 1912. Let me know if you'd like me to email you a copy of the diagram.
Thanks, I'd appreciate that. I know the dimensions from the ORER but can use the additional info of a diagram.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


al_brown03
 

The 1/43 ORER gives the series as MILW 500000-502954, 795 cars. The 1/53 ORER shows a single car left: MILW 502055. There's a photo of MILW 500219 in Krause and Crist's NYO&W book, p 95, in a Middletown & Unionville train.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Awhile back I dug through a lot of material to identify a group
of MILW DS box cars, but now cannot find the full sheet of notes. All
I can find is a note (intended as a pointer to the full note sheet)
saying that these were MILW 500000 to about 502000. Can anyone confirm
if these are the right cars? And if not, what were they?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

These boxcars were ubiquitous, but seldom photographed. These were the boxcars that were largely replaced by the large orders of SS cars in the late twenties, and they were to be completely retired by the production of the welded ribside cars in the late thirties. For all intents and purposes those cars whose lives were then extended by WWII service all but completely disappeared when the war ended. A very few lasted as late as 1953.

The diagram books do depict the breadth and variety of these cars. Richard Hendrickson has the best collection of photos that I know of. Most visual information otherwise has to be gained by close inspection of photographs where these cars are only an incidental subject. Some of the close details can be determined by inspection of the many photos that the Milwaukee shops took of their new-building lightweight "Hiawatha" passenger cars. On the next assembly line in full view were an entire line of the double sheathed cars being converted into flangers and MOW-type cars.

Denny


Ray Breyer
 

Hi Tony,
 
According to the Milwaukee's 1937 freight car diagram book, 500000-502954, built 1913, and 92482-93480, built 1912. Let me know if you'd like me to email you a copy of the diagram.
 
Regards,
 
Ray Breyer

--- On Sun, 4/5/09, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
Subject: [STMFC] MILW double-sheathed box cars
To: STMFC@...
Date: Sunday, April 5, 2009, 12:22 AM

Awhile back I dug through a lot of material to identify a group
of MILW DS box cars, but now cannot find the full sheet of notes. All
I can find is a note (intended as a pointer to the full note sheet)
saying that these were MILW 500000 to about 502000. Can anyone confirm
if these are the right cars? And if not, what were they?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history




------------------------------------

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Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Awhile back I dug through a lot of material to identify a group of MILW DS box cars, but now cannot find the full sheet of notes. All I can find is a note (intended as a pointer to the full note sheet) saying that these were MILW 500000 to about 502000. Can anyone confirm if these are the right cars? And if not, what were they?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history