FMYX 101, 102 and 103.


cdnrailmarine <cdnrailmarine@...>
 

Hello:

Wondering if anyone can offer information and/or photos of the following three tanks cars listed in the 1954 OER?

FMYX 101, 102 and 103.

Per the Offical Equipment Register:
Report movement and mileage to:
Owner (non shipper) North end of Great Northern Dock foot of Campbell Avenue Vancouver, BC Canada.

FM Yorke was a tugboat company operating in the Vancouver area that specilized in rail-barge towing, building in the 1960's two self propelled car ferries. This company later became part of Seaspan.

Cars are all "TM"s, with 102 and 103 having heater coils.

I am wondering if these cars may have been used to transport oil from the Vancouver area refineries to the FM Yorke dock?

Appreciate any information, thanks Ross McLeod Calgary


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Apr 13, 2009, at 7:50 AM, cdnrailmarine wrote:

Wondering if anyone can offer information and/or photos of the
following three tanks cars listed in the 1954 OER?

FMYX 101, 102 and 103.

Per the Offical Equipment Register:
Report movement and mileage to:
Owner (non shipper) North end of Great Northern Dock foot of
Campbell Avenue Vancouver, BC Canada.

FM Yorke was a tugboat company operating in the Vancouver area that
specilized in rail-barge towing, building in the 1960's two self
propelled car ferries. This company later became part of Seaspan.

Cars are all "TM"s, with 102 and 103 having heater coils.

I am wondering if these cars may have been used to transport oil
from the Vancouver area refineries to the FM Yorke dock?




















Ross, The likely (though not by any means the only) explanation is
that F. M. Yorke's tugboats were diesel powered and the tank cars
were used to supply them with diesel fuel. The advantage of Yorke
owning their own cars rather than having fuel delivered in cars owned
by or leased by the fuel supplier is that the cars could stand idle
while storing fuel for future use without incurring charges.

Richard Hendrickson


Doug Rhodes
 

The presence of heater coils is a strong hint that these cars were used for heavy fuel oil, also known as bunker C.

In the steam era, Vancouver refineries were operated to produce an unusually large proportion of heavy fuel oil compared to other petroleum products, to supply railway locomotives, the CPR boats and other shipping at a very favourable price. At least some older tugboats also used bunker C as a fuel.

So it seems possible that it was not diesel fuel but heavy fuel oil in at least the two cars with heater coils. Richard's logic would apply about why they owned their own cars. I don't have documentation handy, but it would not be surprising if FM Yorke supplied their boats directly from the tank cars used as intermediate term storage, rather than having separate fuel tanks at their wharf.

Doug Rhodes
Victoria BC

----- Original Message -----
From: Richard Hendrickson
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, April 13, 2009 9:25 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] FMYX 101, 102 and 103.





On Apr 13, 2009, at 7:50 AM, cdnrailmarine wrote:

> Wondering if anyone can offer information and/or photos of the
> following three tanks cars listed in the 1954 OER?
>
> FMYX 101, 102 and 103.
>
> Per the Offical Equipment Register:
> Report movement and mileage to:
> Owner (non shipper) North end of Great Northern Dock foot of
> Campbell Avenue Vancouver, BC Canada.
>
> FM Yorke was a tugboat company operating in the Vancouver area that
> specilized in rail-barge towing, building in the 1960's two self
> propelled car ferries. This company later became part of Seaspan.
>
> Cars are all "TM"s, with 102 and 103 having heater coils.
>
> I am wondering if these cars may have been used to transport oil
> from the Vancouver area refineries to the FM Yorke dock?
>

Ross, The likely (though not by any means the only) explanation is
that F. M. Yorke's tugboats were diesel powered and the tank cars
were used to supply them with diesel fuel. The advantage of Yorke
owning their own cars rather than having fuel delivered in cars owned
by or leased by the fuel supplier is that the cars could stand idle
while storing fuel for future use without incurring charges.

Richard Hendrickson


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Apr 13, 2009, at 10:13 AM, Doug Rhodes wrote:

The presence of heater coils is a strong hint that these cars were
used for heavy fuel oil, also known as bunker C.

In the steam era, Vancouver refineries were operated to produce an
unusually large proportion of heavy fuel oil compared to other
petroleum products, to supply railway locomotives, the CPR boats
and other shipping at a very favourable price. At least some older
tugboats also used bunker C as a fuel.

So it seems possible that it was not diesel fuel but heavy fuel oil
in at least the two cars with heater coils.











Doug is quite right about this, and I should have thought of it when
I posted my own suggestion. Keep in mind, of course, that so far no
one has come up with anything resembling documentation, so we're all
engaging in sheer speculation.

Richard Hendrickson