two questions


Clark Propst <cepropst@...>
 

#1 How did the "dreadnaught" end get it's name?

#2 What the heck is part 32 on the Tichy AB brake sprue?

As always thanks for any answers,
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Clark,

This might be of some help understanding from where the term originated: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreadnought . In general, the manufacturers of railroad specialties like car ends and roofs like macho-sounding names: Dreadnaught, Indestructible, Viking, etc. Pure marketing. I'm sure Richard will jump in here shortly with more specific information.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Clark Propst wrote:

#1 How did the "dreadnaught" end get it's name?

#2 What the heck is part 32 on the Tichy AB brake sprue?

As always thanks for any answers,
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa




------------------------------------

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Charlie Vlk
 

This may be obviouos, but the term "dreadnaught" was applied to the first battleships developed by England prior to (and somewhat leading to) the first world war.
The term means fear nothing.... it didn't work out to be the ultimate weapon as we know from subsequent history.
I am pretty sure the marketers lifted the term from what was around the turn of the century through the twenties a hot technolorgy.
Charlie Vlk


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Apr 23, 2009, at 10:51 AM, Clark Propst wrote:

#1 How did the "dreadnaught" end get it's name?

From the British battleship Dreadnought which, when it was built in
1906, was a major advance in warship design and was thought at the
time to be impregnable.

#2 What the heck is part 32 on the Tichy AB brake sprue?



A ratchet and lever style hand brake.

Richard Hendrickson


Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I used this part on a CN 40' steel frame car. At NMRA AP judging, I was fortuante that one judge knew what it was. The other judge was going to deduct points for the car having no brake wheel. A lesson learnt that I should be more careful in filling out the judging form next time!

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:


#2 What the heck is part 32 on the Tichy AB brake sprue?



A ratchet and lever style hand brake.

Richard Hendrickson





Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Steve Lucas wrote:
I used this part on a CN 40' steel frame car. At NMRA AP judging, I was fortuante that one judge knew what it was. The other judge was going to deduct points for the car having no brake wheel. A lesson learnt that I should be more careful in filling out the judging form next time!
Yes, ANYTHING out of the ordinary should be called out, and if possible documented with a photo (Xerox copy will suffice). Judges cannot know all prototypes, and will appreciate help--and will of course avoid judging errors!

Tony Thompson former Chief Judge, PCR, NMRA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705
thompson@...


Bruce Smith
 

On Thu, April 23, 2009 8:49 pm, Steve Lucas wrote:
I used this part on a CN 40' steel frame car. At NMRA AP judging, I was
fortuante that one judge knew what it was. The other judge was going to
deduct points for the car having no brake wheel. A lesson learnt that I
should be more careful in filling out the judging form next time!
Or not bother with a system where you have to teach the so called "judges"
what is correct so that they can turn around and "judge" your work... and
where at least 75% of them have no clue what the rules for reweigh or
repack stencils were, and I hazard more than 90% do not know that the LT
WT and Load Limit have to add up to a specific number for a specific
journal/axle size (except, of course where the Load Limit is starred)...

It IS heartening to see that at least part of the Prototype movement has
finally caught the attention of the NMRA contest folks... in Hartford,
they are actually encouraging models, even incomplete models, be brought
for display (and acting as if display only and judging of built up "kits"
is something new!).

Me? I'm content to bring my models to Prototype Rails and the like, where
the only "judges" I care about know what a lever handbrake is (except
apparently for Clark... but I still care about his opinion <VBG>), and
where someone who doesn't is free to ask.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn AL


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bruce Smith wrote:
Or not bother with a system where you have to teach the so called "judges" what is correct so that they can turn around and "judge" your work... and where at least 75% of them have no clue what the rules for reweigh or repack stencils were, and I hazard more than 90% do not know that the LT WT and Load Limit have to add up to a specific number for a specific journal/axle size (except, of course where the Load Limit is starred)...
Gosh, Bruce, sounds like you're the very guy to volunteer to judge in your region . . . and if you do, I'll wager you find it's tougher than you thought.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


tmolsen@...
 

Tony is right in regard to documenting work done on contest models for NMRA model contests. Unfortunately, the judges do not always read everything.

Many years ago a friend of mine entered a brass PRR N8 Class Cabin Car (caboose for the initiated) that had inductive trainphone antenna on the roof which many of the pool cabins had.

He had completely rebuilt a Gem Models N8 and also replaced he stock antenna with a scratch built one, including the receivers that went with it. He also spent a lot of time meticulously documenting everything that he did to this car.

He received an honorable mention with the citation that it was a great model, but the handrails on the roof were "extremely oversized"! So much for documentation. Works only if the person doing the judging reads the sheet accompanying the model!

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@...


Marty McGuirk
 

In fairness to the guys handling the contest room for the NMRA Convention in Hartford certainly did acknowledge the prototype modeling meets when they discussed the "radical" changes to the contest - which now features "An Afternoon of Meet the Modeler, Photographer, & Crafter", a "morning after" meet the judges review of the models after they've been judged, a kit-based model contest, a popular vote contest etc . . .

Sounds like they're trying to take the best parts of the National Narrow Gauge Convention "contest" and the various Proto meets and combine them into one thing.

Not sure it will work, but at least someone at the NMRA Contest is trying Something . . .

Marty


Marty McGuirk
 

I'm curious about something. HMS Dreadnought was spelled with an "o" while the railcar component - ie., "Dreadnaught ends" is usually spelled with an "a" - making it hard to see how one is directly related to the other. (Unless it's a British/American English thing).

The first "Dreadnought," built in 1553, was named with the idea her crew would "Dread nought" - in other words, fear nothing.

The 1906 Dreadnought was the first battleship to have her entire main battery in large guns with a smaller secondary battery - previously similar-sized ships would have had more, but smaller guns. She was also the first warship with a steam turbine, (and used super-heaters, like railroad locomotives) a propulsion system that became standard until surplanted by gas turbines in the 1970s/80s.

Marty

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Apr 23, 2009, at 10:51 AM, Clark Propst wrote:

#1 How did the "dreadnaught" end get it's name?

From the British battleship Dreadnought which, when it was built in
1906, was a major advance in warship design and was thought at the
time to be impregnable.

#2 What the heck is part 32 on the Tichy AB brake sprue?



A ratchet and lever style hand brake.

Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tom Olsen wrote:
Tony is right in regard to documenting work done on contest models for NMRA model contests. Unfortunately, the judges do not always read everything.

. . . So much for documentation. Works only if the person doing the judging reads the sheet accompanying the model!
Tom, you are right, of course, but I will observe that over a number of years judging, in any particular contest it was not uncommon for there to be at least one entrant with a "Novel," a huge document with exquisite quantities of information, mostly text. Now judging takes a few hours in a contest with reasonable entries; no one, and I repeat, NO ONE, during that process can sit down for 20 or 30 minutes to read such a tome.
The key word is "succinct," which means brief but complete. Entrants have to learn to edit their material down to a minimum. To say, "Gee, I submitted meticulous documentation of everything I did," will not get the job done.
We are getting off freight cars, though of course such cars usually make up one of the larger entry groups in NMRA contests.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


cj riley <cjriley42@...>
 

--- On Fri, 4/24/09, cvsne <mjmcguirk@...> wrote:
<I'm curious about something. HMS Dreadnought was spelled with an "o" while the railcar component - ie., "Dreadnaught ends" is usually spelled with an "a" - making it hard to see how one is directly related to the other. (Unless it's a British/American English thing).>


While I am many years removed from speaking Canadian, which is somewhat close to "real English", I would confirm it is a British/ American thing.CJ Riley


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Marty McGuirk wrote:
I'm curious about something. HMS Dreadnought was spelled with an "o" while the railcar component - ie., "Dreadnaught ends" is usually spelled with an "a" - making it hard to see how one is directly related to the other. (Unless it's a British/American English thing).
Nope. The "nought" form is just more archaic, probably taken from the name of the original ship. Even the _Shorter Oxford English Dictionary_ contains both spellings and says the usual form is "naught." Both words have the same root in Old English.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


barrybennetttoo <Barrybennetttoo@...>
 

Nought, spelt with the 'o', is the word describing the number that you guys
refer to as zero, although the wider use of computers has brought zero into
greater use.



There is also a common usage variant of nought/naught in use the the
northern part of England which is 'nowt', meaning nothing or none. The
derivation is fairly obvious.



All of which takes us even further away from freight cars.



Barry Bennett

Coventry, England.

-------Original Message-------



From: Anthony Thompson

Date: 24/04/2009 20:16:13

To: STMFC@...

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: two questions









Marty McGuirk wrote:

I'm curious about something. HMS Dreadnought was spelled with an "o"
while the railcar component - ie., "Dreadnaught ends" is usually
spelled with an "a" - making it hard to see how one is directly
related to the other. (Unless it's a British/American English thing).


Nope. The "nought" form is just more archaic, probably taken

from the name of the original ship. Even the _Shorter Oxford English

Dictionary_ contains both spellings and says the usual form is

"naught." Both words have the same root in Old English.



Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...

Publishers of books on railroad history


pgrace
 

Just on an aside Dreadnought was by 1914 the flagship of a battleship squadron.

Patrick Grace

barrybennetttoo wrote:


Nought, spelt with the 'o', is the word describing the number that you guys
refer to as zero, although the wider use of computers has brought zero into
greater use.

There is also a common usage variant of nought/naught in use the the
northern part of England which is 'nowt', meaning nothing or none. The
derivation is fairly obvious.

All of which takes us even further away from freight cars.

Barry Bennett

Coventry, England.

-------Original Message-------

From: Anthony Thompson

Date: 24/04/2009 20:16:13

To: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: two questions

Marty McGuirk wrote:

I'm curious about something. HMS Dreadnought was spelled with an "o"
while the railcar component - ie., "Dreadnaught ends" is usually
spelled with an "a" - making it hard to see how one is directly
related to the other. (Unless it's a British/American English thing).
Nope. The "nought" form is just more archaic, probably taken

from the name of the original ship. Even the _Shorter Oxford English

Dictionary_ contains both spellings and says the usual form is

"naught." Both words have the same root in Old English.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@... <mailto:thompson%40signaturepress.com>

Publishers of books on railroad history




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Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Barry Bennett wrote:
Nought, spelt with the 'o', is the word describing the number that you guys refer to as zero, although the wider use of computers has brought zero into greater use.
Actually, Barry, the _Oxford English Dictionary_ is quite clear that the two spellings have ENTIRELY the same meanings. Both spellings can be used to mean "zero." The version with "o" is just an older form.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Tim O'Connor
 

Imagine my torment in my Mathematical Logic class when
my English teaching assistant would sprinkle the words
"nought" (zero) and "not" (meaning logical negation)
throughout his lecture. My class notes were a nightmare
to decipher.

Tim O'Connor

At 4/24/2009 06:25 PM Friday, you wrote:
Barry Bennett wrote:
Nought, spelt with the 'o', is the word describing the number that
you guys refer to as zero, although the wider use of computers has
brought zero into greater use.
Actually, Barry, the _Oxford English Dictionary_ is quite clear
that the two spellings have ENTIRELY the same meanings. Both spellings
can be used to mean "zero." The version with "o" is just an older form.

Tony Thompson


Marty McGuirk
 

--- In STMFC@..., P Grace <pgrace@...> wrote:

Just on an aside Dreadnought was by 1914 the flagship of a battleship
squadron.

Patrick Grace
I'm sure Dreadnought was a battleship squadron flag well before that - and by WWI she was already considered outdated by other battleships, which by then were referred to as "Dreadnoughts".

Now, before we all get tossed Herr Brock's jail a freight car question -

"Dreadnaught" ends were a trade name or brand name of a freight car component so-named to imply strength, and toughness - as the general use of the word had come to imply. Correct?



Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Marty McG. wrote:
"Dreadnaught" ends were a trade name or brand name of a freight car component so-named to imply strength, and toughness - as the general use of the word had come to imply. Correct?
Presumably. Around the turn of the 20th century, substantial steel things, especially when liberally riveted, were often called "battleships." I guess it was that era's word for "awesome."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history