Kadee 158s


Clark Propst <cepropst@...>
 

I've replaced the couplers on 50 cars with Kadee 158 scale knuckle 'whisker' couplers and am about to do another 50. But, the local ops guys have trouble uncoupling them with a wood skewer. Is there a better tool to use?
I must say that I'm so busy working on ops switch lists and playing engineer for test ops. I haven't tried my hand...er...skewer on them yet.
I think the whisker springs really enhance the cars tractability
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Steve SANDIFER
 

Try using the skewer to pull the glad hand apart instead of inserting into the coupler jaws.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
From: Clark Propst
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2009 10:07 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Kadee 158s





I've replaced the couplers on 50 cars with Kadee 158 scale knuckle 'whisker' couplers and am about to do another 50. But, the local ops guys have trouble uncoupling them with a wood skewer. Is there a better tool to use?
I must say that I'm so busy working on ops switch lists and playing engineer for test ops. I haven't tried my hand...er...skewer on them yet.
I think the whisker springs really enhance the cars tractability
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Bernd Schroeder
 

or use the uncoupling thingie from Accurail...

http://www.accurail.com/accurail/parts.htm

they also come with the 50pcs packages of the scale size accumates



Bernd

----- Original Message -----
From: <steve.sandifer@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 17, 2009 5:56 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Kadee 158s


Try using the skewer to pull the glad hand apart instead of inserting into the coupler jaws.


rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

That's what they do Steve.
Clark Propst

--- In STMFC@..., <steve.sandifer@...> wrote:

Try using the skewer to pull the glad hand apart instead of inserting into the coupler jaws.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417


pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Some years ago now, somebody sold a manual uncoupling device that you would insert between the two knuckles and give a small twist to uncouple.
The tip had the same shape as a Zulu warrior spear head. I remember it working very well.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "Clark Propst" <cepropst@...> wrote:

I've replaced the couplers on 50 cars with Kadee 158 scale knuckle 'whisker' couplers and am about to do another 50. But, the local ops guys have trouble uncoupling them with a wood skewer. Is there a better tool to use?
I must say that I'm so busy working on ops switch lists and playing engineer for test ops. I haven't tried my hand...er...skewer on them yet.
I think the whisker springs really enhance the cars tractability
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Charles Hladik
 

Pierre,
Go to the nearest McDonalds and abscond with some plastic coffee
stirrers. Cut the "paddle" to a "spearpoint" and viola.
Chuck Hladik

In a message dated 6/17/2009 9:48:10 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
pierre.oliver@... writes:





Some years ago now, somebody sold a manual uncoupling device that you would
insert between the two knuckles and give a small twist to uncouple.
The tip had the same shape as a Zulu warrior spear head. I remember it
working very well.
Pierre Oliver

--- In _STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...) , "Clark
Propst" <cepropst@..c> wrote:

I've replaced the couplers on 50 cars with Kadee 158 scale knuckle
'whisker' couplers and am about to do another 50. But, the local ops guys have
trouble uncoupling them with a wood skewer. Is there a better tool to use?
I must say that I'm so busy working on ops switch lists and playing
engineer for test ops. I haven't tried my hand...er... I must say that
I think the whisker springs really enhance the cars tractability
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Jim Betz
 

Clark,

I build my own uncoupling picks using golf tees. First I sand them into
a wedge/chisel shaped end that is a bit wider than it is deep. Then I sand
the end to a dull rounded point that resembles the shape of a symmetrical
butter knife. Experiment with the size of the wedge - pay attention to the
ratio of the width to the depth. I sand two flat edges on the head of the
tee - to make holding and turning them just a bit easier/more predictable.
Use very gentle to zero downward pressure when turning ... if you push down
too hard it tends to lock/jam the wedge-pick in the couplers and prevent them
from opening.

I have found that the #158s (and all other 'more scale' couplers) are
harder to pick than "old reliable" #5s. And significantly harder if you are
trying to uncouple a #58 size head with a #5 size. When op'ing on layouts
with all/lots of #58 size heads you see more hands grabbing the cars.
Don't get me wrong ... I love the whisker couplers - but find that they
are slightly more likely to not uncouple as easily if the track the coupled
cars are on is anything other than straight. And they don't "play well with
others".

I love the look of them - and the way they stay coupled (they are perhaps
slightly more likely to uncouple when going thru less than perfect track
that has vertical curves in it) - and hate them (relative to #5s) when
uncoupling.

Love-hate relationships ... that's sort of what life is all about? ;-)
- Jim


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jim Betz wrote:
I have found that the #158s (and all other 'more scale' couplers) are harder to pick than "old reliable" #5s. And significantly harder if you are trying to uncouple a #58 size head with a #5 size. When op'ing on layouts
with all/lots of #58 size heads you see more hands grabbing the cars. Don't get me wrong ... I love the whisker couplers - but find that they are slightly more likely to not uncouple as easily if the track the coupled cars are on is anything other than straight. And they don't "play well with others".
Jim, I'd agree entirely with these observations. My feeling is that the biggest problem comes when the two cars to be uncoupled have relatively close coupling, so that it's harder to get the pick in there to do the job. And I have also observed that a #5/#58 or #78 pair is more of a problem that two #58s. But the smaller heads do look great, so I'm sure we're not going back. And as for the occasional problems on curved track, where one or both drawbars have to be nudged to couple, well, that's exactly what happens on the prototype. If anything, we should welcome that little additional bit of accuracy! Just my two cents.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Marty McGuirk
 

--- In STMFC@..., "pierreoliver2003" <pierre.oliver@...> wrote:

Some years ago now, somebody sold a manual uncoupling device that you would insert between the two knuckles and give a small twist to uncouple.
The tip had the same shape as a Zulu warrior spear head. I remember it working very well.
Pierre Oliver
Pierre,

I believe it was Accurail - I have a handful of them.

Yes, they work quite well.

Marty


Schuyler Larrabee
 

I have seen the trusty old McDonald's coffee stirrer used, though with 58s or 158s you have to
narrow the blade a bit. They work pretty well.

SGL

Some years ago now, somebody sold a manual uncoupling device that you would insert between the two
knuckles and
give a small twist to uncouple.
The tip had the same shape as a Zulu warrior spear head. I remember it working very well.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Clark Propst" <cepropst@...>
wrote:

I've replaced the couplers on 50 cars with Kadee 158 scale knuckle 'whisker' couplers and am
about to do another 50.
But, the local ops guys have trouble uncoupling them with a wood skewer. Is there a better tool to
use?
I must say that I'm so busy working on ops switch lists and playing engineer for test ops. I
haven't tried my
hand...er...skewer on them yet.
I think the whisker springs really enhance the cars tractability
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa




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Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Bernd Schroeder" <schroed2.bears@...> wrote:
or use the uncoupling thingie from Accurail...

http://www.accurail.com/accurail/parts.htm <snip>
How does the Accurail "thingie" differ from a skewer?
Gene Green


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Gene Green wrote:
How does the Accurail "thingie" differ from a skewer?
For one thing, in my experience it's far too flexible. And if much force WAS applied, it would simply take on a twist. Unless there was a better version which I never saw, I would urge anyone reading a rave review of this tool to sit down and cool off.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

No one has mentioned the two-magnet uncoupler shaped like lower-case letter "h."

As I recall these were done in red plastic. One would place the lower part of the h so that the glad hands were attracted in opposite directions the same manner as an under track magnet.

That was the theory, anyway. In fact, in actual use the one time I operated on a layout that used them, one side or the other would get too close to a glad hand so the glad hand would attach itself to the magnet. Things went downhill from there.

If someone has used these over a longer period of time can they please say whether or not its use gets any easier with practice?

Gene Green


Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Gene Green" <bierglaeser@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., "Bernd Schroeder" <schroed2.bears@> wrote:
or use the uncoupling thingie from Accurail...

http://www.accurail.com/accurail/parts.htm <snip>
How does the Accurail "thingie" differ from a skewer?
Gene Green
It has shirt pocket clips :-)

Actually, the Accurail "Switchman" was specifically designed to uncouple Accumate couplers; the blade is sized to completely fill the interior space of a pair of Accumates, and when turned they WILL uncouple. Unfortunately, the Kadee knuckle profile is pretty jagged inside, and the Switchman gets hung up just like all the rest of the skewers, coffee stirrers, etc.

Dennis


Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Gene wrote:
No one has mentioned the two-magnet uncoupler shaped like
lower-case letter "h."

As I recall these were done in red plastic. One would place the
lower part of the h so that the glad hands were attracted in
opposite directions the same manner as an under track magnet.

That was the theory, anyway. In fact, in actual use the one time
I operated on a layout that used them, one side or the other
would get too close to a glad hand so the glad hand would attach
itself to the magnet. Things went downhill from there.

If someone has used these over a longer period of time can they
please say whether or not its use gets any easier with practice?
I tried these but they didn't work at all with cars which are close-coupled,
especially house cars. Since I cut off the glad hands on my couplers, it's a
moot point now days. I supply shortened (so they work on my lower deck)
bamboo BBQ skewers and they seemed to work fine, even with #5/#158
combinations.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Gene Green wrote:
No one has mentioned the two-magnet uncoupler shaped like lower-case letter "h."
As I recall these were done in red plastic. One would place the lower part of the h so that the glad hands were attracted in opposite directions the same manner as an under track magnet.
That was the theory, anyway. In fact, in actual use the one time I operated on a layout that used them, one side or the other would get too close to a glad hand so the glad hand would attach itself to the magnet. Things went downhill from there.
If someone has used these over a longer period of time can they please say whether or not its use gets any easier with practice?
I had a couple of these. They also suffered from two additional problems: any steel parts anywhere on a car end, such as grab irons, would vigorously attract the uncoupler. And if the cars were very close coupled, the darn thing didn't even fit between the cars. When conditions were right, it worked okay; otherwise, you needed a second tool. And why carry two?

Tony Thompson
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937;
e-mail: thompsonmarytony@...


Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Gene,

I've used this type of uncoupling device with good results, though it does take a steady hand. I believe it was made by Rix. Mine are white plastic.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Gene Green wrote:

No one has mentioned the two-magnet uncoupler shaped like lower-case letter "h."
As I recall these were done in red plastic. One would place the lower part of the h so that the glad hands were attracted in opposite directions the same manner as an under track magnet.
That was the theory, anyway. In fact, in actual use the one time I operated on a layout that used them, one side or the other would get too close to a glad hand so the glad hand would attach itself to the magnet. Things went downhill from there.

If someone has used these over a longer period of time can they please say whether or not its use gets any easier with practice?

Gene Green


Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Dennis Storzek" <destorzek@...> wrote:

Actually, the Accurail "Switchman" was specifically designed to uncouple Accumate couplers; the blade is sized to completely fill the interior space of a pair of Accumates, and when turned they WILL uncouple. Unfortunately, the Kadee knuckle profile is pretty jagged inside, and the Switchman gets hung up just like all the rest of the skewers, coffee stirrers, etc.

Dennis
I have always cleaned and smoothed the Kadee knuckles with a fine file and then re-blackened them for appearance reasons. I never paid any attention to whether or not doing so would change coupling and uncoupling in any way. That might be worthy of investigation.

Gene Green


Tim O'Connor
 

I've had much better luck with the Accurail device than with
skewers. Also it has a nice clip so it stays in a shirt pocket.
The Kadee tool looks pretty good too. The worst problem is
uncoupling standard Accumates from Kadees... but I'm trying
to replace all the standard size Accumates.

How does the Accurail "thingie" differ from a skewer?
For one thing, in my experience it's far too flexible. And if
much force WAS applied, it would simply take on a twist. Unless there
was a better version which I never saw, I would urge anyone reading a
rave review of this tool to sit down and cool off.

Tony Thompson


Tim O'Connor
 

Gene I do this too. I learned it from my dad in the 1960's.
I think it makes them operate slightly better.

Tim O'Connor

I have always cleaned and smoothed the Kadee knuckles with a fine file and then re-blackened them for appearance reasons. I never paid any attention to whether or not doing so would change coupling and uncoupling in any way. That might be worthy of investigation.
Gene Green