Sergent Engineering couplers (was Kadee 158s)


Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

Comments, please.

There are, apparently, at least two who have converted to Sergent Engineering couplers. Clearly the Sergent couplers are somewhat more expensive but appearance should be quite a bit better than even the so-called "scale" couplers from other manufacturers.

Is scale appearance worth the extra cost or are there other benefits as well?

From what has been said on this forum and the information on the Sergent Engineering web site (much improved since the last time I visited), it seems there would be an increase in the realism of the brakeman's duties on a model railroad. Since, on model railroads, the local takes far too long to make its run when compared to the time it takes the "hot shot" to get from one end of the layout to the other, would the Sergent couplers speed up or slow down the local's progress?

With Sergent couplers all uncoupling and most coupling would have to take place within fairly easy reach from the aisle. Is there a remote uncoupling possibility with Sergents?

Gene Green


William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Gene,

I have found that operations... local switching and way freights...
move at a slower pace than switching with other coupler systems. And
you are correct that the operations must be within easy reach of the
aisle. This means that the train is assembled for the evening's
operations on the on-stage portion of the layout and then backed off-
stage to the staging track complete.

My layout is a switching layout based upon the end of an eastern
Kansas ATSF branch line. Service is a single train down the line and
return to the junction daily except Sunday. With such an operation
there is no "hot shot" to worry about. My train is a mixed train
powered by a motorcar. All consists are less than 1,000 tons.

Hope that the above provides some answers.

-- Bill Keene
Irvine, CA

On Jun 20, 2009, at 6:55 AM, Gene Green wrote:



Comments, please.

There are, apparently, at least two who have converted to Sergent
Engineering couplers. Clearly the Sergent couplers are somewhat more
expensive but appearance should be quite a bit better than even the
so-called "scale" couplers from other manufacturers.

Is scale appearance worth the extra cost or are there other benefits
as well?

From what has been said on this forum and the information on the
Sergent Engineering web site (much improved since the last time I
visited), it seems there would be an increase in the realism of the
brakeman's duties on a model railroad. Since, on model railroads,
the local takes far too long to make its run when compared to the
time it takes the "hot shot" to get from one end of the layout to
the other, would the Sergent couplers speed up or slow down the
local's progress?

With Sergent couplers all uncoupling and most coupling would have to
take place within fairly easy reach from the aisle. Is there a
remote uncoupling possibility with Sergents?

Gene Green



Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

Just to stir the pot (VBG) how do you uncouple passenger cars with Sergents? I know, this is a freight car list so we don't care!

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Jon Miller says:



Just to stir the pot (VBG) how do you uncouple passenger cars with Sergents? I know, this is a freight car list so we don't care!
But, note that we include head end cars in the STMFC.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Jerry <jrs060@...>
 

Gene, I think you, and the group, might enjoy watching some videos done
by Tim Warris of Bronx Terminal fame that should give you a little better
understanding on the Sargents and how they work. Have a look!

http://www.bronx-terminal.com/?cat=43

And yes, someone has come up with a magnet blade that will uncouple a
Sargent under a passenger or express car diaphragm or buffer! And everyone
should know, you can't do that with a skewer stick.

Happiness, Jerry Stewart

Woodstock, Ill.

--- In STMFC@..., "Gene Green" <bierglaeser@...> wrote:

Comments, please.

There are, apparently, at least two who have converted to Sergent Engineering couplers. Clearly the Sergent couplers are somewhat more expensive but appearance should be quite a bit better than even the so-called "scale" couplers from other manufacturers.

Is scale appearance worth the extra cost or are there other benefits as well?

From what has been said on this forum and the information on the Sergent Engineering web site (much improved since the last time I visited), it seems there would be an increase in the realism of the brakeman's duties on a model railroad. Since, on model railroads, the local takes far too long to make its run when compared to the time it takes the "hot shot" to get from one end of the layout to the other, would the Sergent couplers speed up or slow down the local's progress?

With Sergent couplers all uncoupling and most coupling would have to take place within fairly easy reach from the aisle. Is there a remote uncoupling possibility with Sergents?

Gene Green


octoraro1@...
 

The question is whether there is remote uncoupling possibility with the Sergent couplers.  I can't imagine how.  As I understand the principle, a tiny metal ball keeps the knuckle closed.  The magnet held above the coupler raises the ball out of its seat so the knuckle will open.

--- On Sat, 6/20/09, Gene Green <bierglaeser@...> wrote:


From: Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Sergent Engineering couplers (was Kadee 158s)
To: STMFC@...
Date: Saturday, June 20, 2009, 9:55 AM








Comments, please.

There are, apparently, at least two who have converted to Sergent Engineering couplers. Clearly the Sergent couplers are somewhat more expensive but appearance should be quite a bit better than even the so-called "scale" couplers from other manufacturers.

Is scale appearance worth the extra cost or are there other benefits as well?

From what has been said on this forum and the information on the Sergent Engineering web site (much improved since the last time I visited), it seems there would be an increase in the realism of the brakeman's duties on a model railroad. Since, on model railroads, the local takes far too long to make its run when compared to the time it takes the "hot shot" to get from one end of the layout to the other, would the Sergent couplers speed up or slow down the local's progress?

With Sergent couplers all uncoupling and most coupling would have to take place within fairly easy reach from the aisle. Is there a remote uncoupling possibility with Sergents?

Gene Green


Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., octoraro1@... wrote:

The question is whether there is remote uncoupling possibility with the Sergent couplers.  I can't imagine how.  As I understand the principle, a tiny metal ball keeps the knuckle closed.  The magnet held above the coupler raises the ball out of its seat so the knuckle will open.
Sergent used to sell "remote uncoupler", it was a U shaped casting that held a little rare earth magnet. This was to be placed on top of the coupler while the cars were still in reach, and kept the locking ball raised. The car to be spotted was then pushed to where it needed to go, and the uncoupler came back with the car doing the pushing, where it was retrieved and went back in the switchman's pocket. For some reason I don't see it on the Sergent web site anymore.

Dennis


Jared Harper <harper-brown@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., William Keene <wakeene@...> wrote:

Gene,

I have found that operations... local switching and way freights...
move at a slower pace than switching with other coupler systems. And
you are correct that the operations must be within easy reach of the
aisle. This means that the train is assembled for the evening's
operations on the on-stage portion of the layout and then backed off-
stage to the staging track complete.

My layout is a switching layout based upon the end of an eastern
Kansas ATSF branch line. Service is a single train down the line and
return to the junction daily except Sunday. With such an operation
there is no "hot shot" to worry about. My train is a mixed train
powered by a motorcar. All consists are less than 1,000 tons.

Hope that the above provides some answers.
I am modeling a one train a day Santa Fe branchline on a shelf. I will be using Sergents. My operations will be the same as Bill's.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Jared Harper <harper-brown@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Jon Miller" <atsf@...> wrote:

Just to stir the pot (VBG) how do you uncouple passenger cars with
Sergents? I know, this is a freight car list so we don't care!
Jon,
On my Santa Fe Alma branch layout I will only have one passenger car so I don't care. If you use Sergents on passenger cars you will just need to experiment with uncoupling from a different angle.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Jared Harper <harper-brown@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

Jon Miller says:



Just to stir the pot (VBG) how do you uncouple passenger cars with
Sergents? I know, this is a freight car list so we don't care!
But, note that we include head end cars in the STMFC.
We do?
Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

Many thanks to Bill Keene, Jared Harper, Jon Miller, octoraro1948 (do not know your name. Sorry.), Tim O'Connor, Dennis Storzek, Denny Anspach, Schuyler Larrabee, Tony Thompson and Clark Propst for information or just plain opinions about Sergent couplers as well as the various Kadee and Accumate couplers under this subject heading and "Re: Kadee 158s." Especial thanks to Jerry Stewart for referring me to videos done by Tim Warris of Bronx Terminal fame. I have a lot to think about.

At present I'm pretty well committed to Kadee 5s and 58s but I see some experimentation in my future.

Gene Green
Headed to Santa Fe country.