Patent Model of Railroad Truck


Marty McGuirk
 

Currently up for auction on eBay (no, it's not my auction and I have no idea
who's it is) is an unusual truck patent, along with the concept model.

You can see it here:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=220450004938

Patent applicant is a Mr. Walther Chalfent of Brownsville, PA and the truck has an unusual double sideframe design (essentially, there are sideframes on both sides of the wheels. The patent application dates from just before World War I - 1915-16.

From the side the sideframes look similar to more contemporary trucks, but no specific features that scream "here is the origins of "XX" truck can be readily identified from the images with the auction. I'd say most likely this is an interesting concept that proved unworkable, too costly, or unreliable and therefore never got beyond the patent/prototype stage.

Thought some of the truck historians on this list would be interested and perhaps some may know better than I if anything came of this design - or the patent applicant.

Marty McGuirk


Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

Quite a high asking price for such a crude model. I suppose that the reserve price may be what it is due to the patent documentation that comes with the model.

As for this patent being issued "just before WWI", that threw this Canadian for a loop. The UK, Canada, and Australia (a few citizens of each are on this list) were involved in WWI from 1914-18.

Steve Lucas
Ingersoll, Ontario, Canada.

--- In STMFC@..., "cvsne" <mjmcguirk@...> wrote:

Currently up for auction on eBay (no, it's not my auction and I have no idea
who's it is) is an unusual truck patent, along with the concept model.

You can see it here:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=220450004938

Patent applicant is a Mr. Walther Chalfent of Brownsville, PA and the truck has an unusual double sideframe design (essentially, there are sideframes on both sides of the wheels. The patent application dates from just before World War I - 1915-16.

From the side the sideframes look similar to more contemporary trucks, but no specific features that scream "here is the origins of "XX" truck can be readily identified from the images with the auction. I'd say most likely this is an interesting concept that proved unworkable, too costly, or unreliable and therefore never got beyond the patent/prototype stage.

Thought some of the truck historians on this list would be interested and perhaps some may know better than I if anything came of this design - or the patent applicant.

Marty McGuirk


Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

No axles (2 wheels axles) and double bearings on each wheel may have made it dead in the water. Very expensive to maintain in 1914.

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Marty McGuirk
 

Okay . . . "before the U.S. entry into WWI."



But what do I know, my grandfathers' were both behind barricades in Dublin and Cork in 1916 . . .

----- Original Message -----
From: "Steve Lucas" <stevelucas3@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, July 15, 2009 10:20:19 AM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Patent Model of Railroad Truck








Quite a high asking price for such a crude model. I suppose that the reserve price may be what it is due to the patent documentation that comes with the model.

As for this patent being issued "just before WWI", that threw this Canadian for a loop. The UK, Canada, and Australia (a few citizens of each are on this list) were involved in WWI from 1914-18.

Steve Lucas
Ingersoll, Ontario, Canada.

--- In STMFC@... , "cvsne" <mjmcguirk@...> wrote:

Currently up for auction on eBay (no, it's not my auction and I have no idea
who's it is) is an unusual truck patent, along with the concept model.

You can see it here:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=220450004938

Patent applicant is a Mr. Walther Chalfent of Brownsville, PA and the truck has an unusual double sideframe design (essentially, there are sideframes on both sides of the wheels. The patent application dates from just before World War I - 1915-16.

From the side the sideframes look similar to more contemporary trucks, but no specific features that scream "here is the origins of "XX" truck can be readily identified from the images with the auction. I'd say most likely this is an interesting concept that proved unworkable, too costly, or unreliable and therefore never got beyond the patent/prototype stage.

Thought some of the truck historians on this list would be interested and perhaps some may know better than I if anything came of this design - or the patent applicant.

Marty McGuirk



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


SUVCWORR@...
 

The patent documentation may be the excuse for the high price but it is an expired patent and the documentation can be obtained from the US Patent and Trademark Office for the cost of duplicating and shipping if you take the time to search the US patents on line and find the patent number.? I would venture that would be far less than the current asking price on Ebay.

Rich Orr

-----Original Message-----
From: Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wed, Jul 15, 2009 10:20 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Patent Model of Railroad Truck










Quite a high asking price for such a crude model. I suppose that the reserve
price may be what it is due to the patent documentation that comes with the
model.

As for this patent being issued "just before WWI", that threw this Canadian for
a loop. The UK, Canada, and Australia (a few citizens of each are on this list)
were involved in WWI from 1914-18.

Steve Lucas
Ingersoll, Ontario, Canada.

--- In STMFC@..., "cvsne" <mjmcguirk@...> wrote:

Currently up for auction on eBay (no, it's not my auction and I have no idea
who's it is) is an unusual truck patent, along with the concept model.

You can see it here:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=220450004938

Patent applicant is a Mr. Walther Chalfent of Brownsville, PA and the truck
has an unusual double sideframe design (essentially, there are sideframes on
both sides of the wheels. The patent application dates from just before World
War I - 1915-16.

From the side the sideframes look similar to more contemporary trucks, but no
specific features that scream "here is the origins of "XX" truck can be readily
identified from the images with the auction. I'd say most likely this is an
interesting concept that proved unworkable, too costly, or unreliable and
therefore never got beyond the patent/prototype stage.

Thought some of the truck historians on this list would be interested and
perhaps some may know better than I if anything came of this design - or the
patent applicant.

Marty McGuirk



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