Freight cars owned are not employed in Interstate Commerce


cdnrailmarine <cdnrailmarine@...>
 

The BC Electric Railway entry in the ORER of October 1926 has the notation "Freight cars owned are not employed in Interstate Commerce" however, under the listing of freight and passenger equipment:

"Freight equipment only in switching service with direct connections."

For anyone wishing to move those old soldiers off line in freight service here is a precedent.

The BC Electric in this listing indicated 419 freight cars in service, 184 Plain Box, 12 Stock, 23 gondolas, 178 flats etc.

Ross McLeod Calgary


railsnw1 <railsnw@...>
 

I think that meens direct connection on BC Electric Lines only. I have seen photos of these cars and most had "BCE" and the number only, no other data that would be required.

Richard Wilkens

--- In STMFC@..., "cdnrailmarine" <cdnrailmarine@...> wrote:



The BC Electric Railway entry in the ORER of October 1926 has the notation "Freight cars owned are not employed in Interstate Commerce" however, under the listing of freight and passenger equipment:

"Freight equipment only in switching service with direct connections."

For anyone wishing to move those old soldiers off line in freight service here is a precedent.

The BC Electric in this listing indicated 419 freight cars in service, 184 Plain Box, 12 Stock, 23 gondolas, 178 flats etc.

Ross McLeod Calgary


Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@..., "railsnw1" <railsnw@...> wrote:

I think that meens direct connection on BC Electric Lines only. I have seen photos of these cars and most had "BCE" and the number only, no other data that would be required.

Richard Wilkens
I believe this is a Canadianism, not otherwise done in the US, and maybe only done in the port of Vancouver. If Rod Kirkham is on this list he could probabally tell us for sure, but as I recall BCE needed to use the CP to access the docks, and had an agreement where CP would handle their junk only between the docks and the BCE connection; it was up to the CP to be sure the cars didn't escape onto the general rail network.

Dennis


Ross McLeod <cdnrailmarine@...>
 

Dennis - I am sure you are right, likely uniquely Canadian and maybe only one sided.
By that I mean the other carriers (cnx's) may or may not have gone along with the BCE in their acceptance of old BCE cars in freight interswitching movements.
 
The BC Electric in 1926 showed in their ORER listing, 3 CNR interchanges, 3 CPR, 1 Milw, 3 GN and 1 NP interchange all in BC.
 
While the BCE was also operating CPR's VLI branch under lease, this part of their operation was never known as the BCE, it retained its VLI identity.
 
I doubt we will ever determine if in fact the cnx's accepted this business, interesting as a operations possibity for someone basement railway.
 
Ross McLeod Calgary


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Robert kirkham
 

Sorry to be late to chime in on this thread - was off on a few days vacation in Pender Harbour on the Sunshine Coast. Plenty of heat and plenty of salt water to cool off in - fabulous!

I can't add very much to this thread as the BCER has not been a research interest until more recently. But I can make a few observations:

- The BCER was both a city and interurban electric railway, with passenger and freight service through much of the Lower Mainland radiating out from Vancouver. The passenger service was so good that even today one would be hard pressed to equal it for a commute into the city of Vancouver.

- much of the trackage passed through agricultural land, and the movement of mail, LCL, produce, dairy and meat products required freight cars. These would never really have to go off-line, as they were able to pick up on the BCER and drop off on the BCER.

- as a result of its sprawling trackage, the railway had interchange points with a number of carriers, such that directly or indirectly they could receive traffic from the CPR, CNR, GNR, NP, PGE, NHB,....

- I do not recall seeing photos of their rolling stock on CPR property (except where interchange tracks existed). On the other hand, I have seen many shots of Class 1 RR equipment being switched on BCER trackage. So I conclude from this (very incomplete) evidence that the BCER freight cars were not used for loads destined off line.

A couple of comments of wider interest:

- Dennis - are you suggesting that small railways in the USA would always letter their rolling stock so that it could be interchanged - even small interurban lines? Or were you restricting the comment to other larger railways. I'm a bit surprised to think other local lines wouldn't have taken a similar approach as the BCER. But that leads to the other thought - legislation.

- one of the factors at play (not necessarily the important one in this case, but I thought I'd ask) was that most of our railway legislation is Federal, and only applies to railways that cross boarders from one province to another or from a province to another country (i.e. the USA). As such, I suspect (but have not read the legislation yet) that a local outfit like the BCER did not have to comply with all the reg's applicable to the larger lines and merely complied with local (Provincial) legislation. In fact, avoiding federal regulation may have motivated the line to avoide interchaninging its rolling stock. I'm not at all sure of this - juat throwing it ou for comment.

In any event, perhaps the USA regulation of railways was more encompassing and so forced small USA lines to follow the lettering of rolling stock practices of the big outfits?

Rob Kirkham

--- In STMFC@..., "Dennis Storzek" <destorzek@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., "railsnw1" <railsnw@> wrote:

I think that meens direct connection on BC Electric Lines only. I have seen photos of these cars and most had "BCE" and the number only, no other data that would be required.

Richard Wilkens
I believe this is a Canadianism, not otherwise done in the US, and maybe only done in the port of Vancouver. If Rod Kirkham is on this list he could probabally tell us for sure, but as I recall BCE needed to use the CP to access the docks, and had an agreement where CP would handle their junk only between the docks and the BCE connection; it was up to the CP to be sure the cars didn't escape onto the general rail network.

Dennis